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Six Elements of Effective Coalitions - Efficiency & Cohesion

3:00pm - January 21, 2021 | Timezone: US/Eastern
Global PTTC
Registration Deadline: January 21, 2021

Webinar Description:

This webinar is the final installment of a four-part series, The Six Elements of Effective Coalitions, produced by the PTTC Network Community Coalitions and Collaborators Working Group.

In our last webinar, we learned how to intentionally foster goal directedness and develop members’ skills. This webinar will answer the question, ‘how do you ensure your coalition is working efficiently towards its overall goals as well as building cohesion among its members?’ We will explore how to intentionally foster cohesion and work efficiently, highlighting real-world examples with two coalition spotlights.
 

Webinar Learning Objectives:

Upon completion of this virtual learning experience, participants will be able to:
1.    Define what efficiency and cohesion means for coalition members
2.    Describe why fostering efficiency and cohesion is important to coalitions success
3.    Share two coalition success stories to demonstrate how to foster efficiency and cohesion within your coalition
4.    Describe the full model of 6 elements for effective community coalitions


Webinar Presenters 

Kristen Power PictureDr. Kristen Gilmore Powell, PhD, LSW is an Assistant Research Professor with the Rutgers University School of Social Work and Associate Director of the Center for Prevention Science. She is also the Director of the Northeast and Caribbean Prevention Technology Transfer Center. Dr. Powell earned her Ph.D. from Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, School of Social Work, in 2013.  She has been conducting research on topics relevant to prevention science, community coalitions, and empowerment theory for more than 10 years. Dr. Powell currently serves as Principal Investigator and Investigator on multiple externally funded research projects. Much of this work focuses on how individual and environmental strategies can prevent the harmful consequences of substance misuse, particularly in communities identified with high need and existing health disparities.