Products and Resources Catalog

Center
Product Type
Target Audience
Language
Keywords
Date Range
Multimedia
Stigma the Gift that Keeps on Giving: Residual Effects of Stress During the Recovery Process from Active Substance Use Part 1 Demetrie Garner, CPRS, and Shawn Colvin, CPRS, RPS, RCPF June 11, 2024, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION While many intricate parts develop a positive outcome to recovery, identifying triggers that cause stress is the first step to a continuous, healthy recovery. Stigma can often become the conduit for environmental and emotional triggers. It is crucial to challenge and dismantle the stigmatizing attitudes and beliefs surrounding addiction and the recovery process. As we unpack the association of stress and triggers, we will close the loop on the missing link of dismantling the negative attitude of doubt facing the newcomer in recovery. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Understand the importance of identifying triggers that cause stress during recovery. Recognize the role of stigma as a potential trigger for stress in individuals in recovery. Investigate the various ways in which stigma can act as environmental and emotional triggers. Consider how dismantling stigma can contribute to a healthier and more successful recovery. PRESENTERS Demetrie Garner, CPRS, as a Peer Recovery Specialist, has been presented with the unique opportunity of working in the largest Emergency Department in the state of Maryland. This has given him the vantage point to encounter minority disparities. A lack of health communication targeted to African-Americans and other minorities help further this disparity. As a Peer Recovery Specialist, the visible cracks of systemic inadequacies in health care and its access garners attention and policy changes in patients with substance use disorders. Having the experience in active addiction abusing opiates, cocaine, and alcohol for 26 years with countless relapses fostered the experience needed to help others in active addiction. Finding recovery over the last 2 and 1/2 years while working in the recovery field has given Demetrie a unique perspective in recidivism and retention throughout the process of recovery. With the help of the God of his understanding (Jesus Christ), Narcotics Anonymous, and healthy relationships, the pathway of a daily reprieve from active addiction is now possible. Continuous work through pastoral licensed counseling has unlocked the acceptance of childhood molestation and recovery from trauma. After 21 years since Demetrie decided to drop out of high school in the 11th grade, education seemed to become more important to obtain. If he wants to help individuals who look like himself and suffer from trauma and active addiction, then higher education has to be pursued. While at the University of Maryland at Baltimore County, currently a sophomore, Demetrie’s interest in studies is in the social science of public health. Future involvement with research is being pursued with patients that have wait times in emergency rooms with substance use disorders. Previous research this past semester has examined minorities hesitancy to receive Covid vaccinations. Shawn Colvin, CPRS, RPS, RCPF, has been working in the field of recovery professionally for 10 1/2 years at the Helping Up Mission in Baltimore City. He has been clean and sober for 13 years. Shawn loves being a Treatment Manager, Peer Specialist, Facilitator, and Treatment Coordinator! Shawn has a passion for assisting others toward a life of positive transformation out of the darkness of addiction!
Published: June 11, 2024
Multimedia
Building Bridges: Fostering Community-Campus Collaboration for Substance Use Prevention, Harm Reduction, & Recovery   Join the Southeast PTTC for a lively discussion on the power of collaboration between college campuses and their surrounding communities to support substance misuse prevention, harm reduction and recovery. Our panel of regional experts shared insights, best practices, and success stories, empowering participants with the knowledge needed to implement successful initiatives.   Supplemental Resources: Presentation Slides   Learning Objectives: Understand the significance of collaborative approaches between college campuses and surrounding communities to support prevention, harm reduction, and recovery among youth and young adults. Identify key strategies for building collaborative college campus and community partnerships to address substance use among youth and young adults. Learn about prevention, harm reduction, and recovery initiatives being implemented on college campuses from regional experts. Identify strategies and tools available to implement effective substance misuse prevention, harm reduction, and recovery initiatives within college campuses and surrounding communities.   Presented by: Dr. Lori Ann Eldridge is an assistant professor at East Carolina University, North Carolina. She is a public health implementation scientist specializing in substance use. Her research is dedicated to examining the accessibility of prevention, treatment, and harm reduction services for substance use in rural and underserved communities. Currently, she is the Principal Investigator of Pitt County Coalition on Substance Use Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act Opioid and Stimulant Grant funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. With this work she is bridging partnerships between the local community and East Carolina University campus to prevent youth and young adult substance use and related harms. She has worked with students to expand access to naloxone and other harm reduction strategies at East Carolina University and is a co-faculty mentor for the Team Awareness Combatting Overdose at East Carolina University. Kayce Matthews is the Director of the Coalition for Healthy and Safe Campus Communities (CHASCo) in Tennessee. In this role she oversees the collection of higher education institutions and professionals in Tennessee who are working to address issues of campus health and safety. The work of CHASCO includes providing professional development & networking opportunities, providing assessment tools to campuses, and providing resources and funding for evidence-based prevention programing. Kayce joined CHASCo with over 10 years of experience in prevention and advocacy work. Before joining CHASCo, Kayce worked for the TN Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence. In this role, she founded both the TN Campus Prevention Project and the TN Statewide Sexual Assault Prevention Committee. Previous to the TN Coalition, she served as the Associate Director of the Margaret Cuninggim Women’s Center at Vanderbilt University. She holds a Master of Arts in Counseling from Trevecca University, a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Stephens College, and is a Certified Prevention Specialist. Annette Newton-Baldwin is the Assistant Director of the LION UP Recovery Program (Collegiate Recovery Program) and Intervention. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor as well as a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. She serves the Association of Recovery in Higher Education as the Southeast Region Representative. Currently serves as Project Director for the Louisiana Collegiate Recovery Expansion Grant. Reese Hiatt is an undergraduate student at East Carolina University, North Carolina. She is a marketing major and Co-President of Team Awareness Combatting Overdose. She is dedicated to advocating for those experiencing substance use disorder and making a positive difference in the amount of harm reduction resources available to those in need.  
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia
Behavioral Health Services for Criminal Justice-Involved Populations Part 2: Evidence-Based Strategies and Recommendations for Providing Services Josh Esrick, MPP, and Lauren Pappacena, MSW March 9, 2023, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will explore the evidence base around effective behavioral health interventions for criminal justice-involved populations. It will discuss substance use, overdose, and suicide prevention and treatment services for both the juvenile and adult justice systems. As part of this, the webinar will review the evidence base for drug treatment courts as an alternative to continued justice system involvement. The webinar will also provide strategies for improving collaborative efforts between the behavioral health continuum of care and criminal justice system organizations. Lastly, the webinar will introduce resources that behavioral health professionals can use to learn more about these topics. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Explain how prevention and treatment strategies can be applied to criminal justice-involved populations Describe the evidence base of effective behavioral health interventions for these populations, including drug treatment courts Identify potential strategies and partners for expanding the reach of behavioral health services in the criminal justice system List resources to learn more about serving criminal justice-involved populations PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing T/TA to numerous organizations. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Lauren Pappacena, MSW is a Research Associate with Carnevale Associates. Lauren has a background in criminal justice and juvenile justice research specifically as it relates to evidence-based programs and practices spanning criminal justice topics, including corrections, law enforcement, reentry, and courts. Currently, she assists with training evaluations for NADCP and the PTTC, where she brings her experience with quantitative and qualitative analysis and data visualization. With a strong interest in policy analysis, research translation, data collection, and analytic writing, Ms. Pappacena is published in the Journal of Human Rights and Social Work for her analysis of national early-release laws.
Published: March 9, 2024
Multimedia
Behavioral Health Services for Criminal Justice-Involved Populations Part 3: Serving Children of Incarcerated Parents Josh Esrick, MPP, and Lauren Pappacena, MSW March 14, 2023, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will review the importance of providing behavioral health services to children of incarcerated parents. It will discuss the need for services and the impact that parental incarceration can have on youth development. It will also introduce evidence-based strategies and resources for children and families impacted by parental criminal justice-system involvement. Additionally, the webinar will walk through the planning steps to developing new service programs for these children and families and review potential collaborative partners for these efforts. Lastly, the webinar will provide an opportunity for facilitated small group discussion about serving children of incarcerated parents. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Explain the service needs of children of incarcerated parents Describe the evidence-based strategies and resources that can support children and families impacted by parental criminal justice-system involvement Prepare for the development of new service programs Identify other stakeholders serving children of incarcerated parents PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing T/TA to numerous organizations. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Lauren Pappacena, MSW is a Research Associate with Carnevale Associates. Lauren has a background in criminal justice and juvenile justice research specifically as it relates to evidence-based programs and practices spanning criminal justice topics, including corrections, law enforcement, reentry, and courts. Currently, she assists with training evaluations for NADCP and the PTTC, where she brings her experience with quantitative and qualitative analysis and data visualization. With a strong interest in policy analysis, research translation, data collection, and analytic writing, Ms. Pappacena is published in the Journal of Human Rights and Social Work for her analysis of national early-release laws.  
Published: March 14, 2023
Multimedia
Recording: Alcohol is STILL a Drug: The Impact of Alcohol Use on Individuals with Mental Illness    This presentation will review the comprehensive impact alcohol use has on people who have a co-occurring psychiatric conditions, including depression, generalized anxiety disorder, bipolar disorder, PTSD and schizophrenia. Special consideration will be given to the impact of COVID-19 and factors that promote initiating and sustaining recovery. 
Published: June 7, 2022
Multimedia
Download the webinar presentation Translations     Presented by: Dr. Jana Spalding Description: The Southeast PTTC in collaboration with the National Hispanic & Latino PTTC offers this training for prevention practitioners in HHS Region 4: AL, FL, GA, KY, MI, NC, SC and TN.  This training, offered in response to a need identified by Region 4 stakeholders, will focus on the relationship between our personal and professional cultural backgrounds and those of people whose historical roots are embedded in the expansion of Spain, once a powerful global empire. Do people in this diaspora have particular views, beliefs, and biases about substance misuse?  Are they different than ours? Dr. Jana Spalding will explore and encourage deeply reflective questions such as--from what cultural framework has the field of prevention developed? What assumptions, unspoken beliefs, and biases exist in the field of prevention? How can we ever know how to work with people whose ways of being in the world are different from ours? How can we ever understand, much less find common ground with, people from another culture in order to prevent substance misuse and promote health? Learning Objectives: Challenge prevention professionals to reflect on their own personal and professional cultural assumptions and biases Consider the cultural context from which the field of prevention in the US has emerged and its relevancy to people and groups from other cultural backgrounds Motivate prevention professionals to pursue ways to increase their own cultural humility: understanding their own cultural makeup first, so as to respectfully relate to people of different cultures different  Understand that the challenge is not just to teach our concepts and practices of prevention, but to assist – even as we work on it ourselves -- to acquire skills to adapt to the changing cultural contexts in which we all find ourselves     About Jana Spalding, MD, CPSS A native Spanish speaker, Dr. Spalding was born in Panama and completed high school there before immigrating to the US, where she completed her medical degree at Stanford University. She has served for 20+ year in behavioral health, a field she first entered as a peer support specialist. Recovery and peer support training followed, then recovery services administration and university level advanced peer support instruction. In 2018 Dr. Spalding began building a behavioral health consulting and training practice. During this time the need for services in Spanish to Spanish speakers with behavioral health challenges came into focus in her work. She began translating and interpreting, first as a freelancer and then with a language services company. Dr. Spalding’s passion to advance recovery for Spanish speakers has found an outlet with the National Latino Behavioral Health Association, where, among other collaborations, she has delivered Behavioral Health Interpreter Training face to face and virtually since 2017.
Published: June 10, 2021
Print Media
Polysubstance use is the recurrent use of multiple illicit substances, legalized substances, or prescription drugs in a manner other than as prescribed. Using a single substance significantly increases the risk of using additional substances, and evidence suggests that most people who have substance use disorders are polysubstance users. Polysubstance use can stem from various behavioral cues or demand elasticity and can occur sequentially or concurrently. The Central East PTTC has developed the "Preventing Polysubstance Use in Primary Care Settings" handout to provide an overview for prevention professionals and primary care providers on this topic. This handout also provides strategies and tips for preventing polysubstance use.   Please find a preview of the first page of this handout below. *To view the complete handout and for a shareable version, please use the Download link above.    
Published: June 1, 2021
Multimedia
  This webinar is presented in collaboration with the Great Lakes PTTC. The webinar will explain important aspects of which potential providers of evidence-based programs (EBPs) should be aware in considering and selecting an EBP for use with Latino populations. The distinction between an evidence-based program and an evidence-based practice is described on the basis of the types of evidence used to successfully implement an EBP in a specific setting. The different types of evidence applicable to an evidence-based practice will be described, including the type of evidence on which EBPs rely, which is largely researcher driven, and the types of evidence that providers, agencies, and communities serving Latinos use in implementing an EBP, which is largely agency and community driven. The role of politics, power, and privilege in the development and implementation of an EBP will be discussed. The importance of recognizing, valuing, and integrating non-research types of evidence in the implementation of an EBP in a particular Latino community will be highlighted. Objectives of the Webinar: Understand the difference between an evidence-based program and a culturally responsive evidence-based practice Understand the different types of evidence relevant to the development, selection, and use of an evidence-based program Identify the basic concepts and research methods underlying EBPs Understand the contributions of meta-analyses of EBP studies, the components that contribute to behavioral change, and the advantages and limitations of EBPs Recognize the role of politics, power, and privilege in the development and implementation of an EBP Appreciate the importance of the program provider-recipient relationship in program outcome Recognize and value the types of evidence available in specific agencies serving Latino communities that are necessary to optimize the success of an EBP. Additional Resources Presentation Handouts   Translations       About the Presenter: Luis A. Vargas is a clinical psychologist, a retired university faculty member, and a member of the Board of Directors of the National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA). His clinical and scholarly work has focused on providing culturally responsive services to children, adolescents, and families in Latino communities. He is co-editor (with Joan D. Koss-Chioino) of Working with Culture: Psychotherapeutic Interventions with Ethnic Minority Children and Adolescents and co-author (with Joan D. Koss-Chioino) of Working with Latino Youth: Culture, Development, and Context, both published by Jossey-Bass. He is a past president of the Division of Child and Family Policy and Practice (Div. 37) of the American Psychological Association (APA), a past member of the APA Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest, and a past member of the 2006 APA Task Force on Evidence-Based Practice for Children and Adolescents. He is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association (Div. 12, 37, & 45) and a Fellow of the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB).
Published: April 22, 2021
Multimedia
The National Hispanic and Latino Prevention Technology Transfer Center, and the National American Indian and Alaskan Native Prevention Technology Transfer Center are happy to invite you to a series of Virtual Learning Sessions: CULTURE IS PREVENTION. Culture is fundamental to develop a successful career or a successful organization, and building that culture is everyone's responsibility. Despite recent progress, health disparities continue a challenge among Latino/Hispanic, Native Americans, and Alaska Natives, compared with the US population as a whole. National data show the need to enhance services and access to services for culturally and linguistically diverse communities. Providing culturally and linguistically appropriate prevention services requires an understanding of cultural competence/Humility. This session is the last of 4 sessions. Session 1: Different Cultures; One Vision (Click for Slides) Session Co-hosted by the National Hispanic and Latino Prevention Technology Transfer Center (NHL PTTC) and the National American Indian & Alaska Native Prevention Technology Transfer Center (NAI/AN PTTC). Session 2: Spirituality In The Native American culture And Its Role In Prevention And Healing (Click for Slides) Session Hosted by the National American Indian & Alaska Native Prevention Technology Transfer Center (NAI/AN PTTC). Session 3: Spirituality in the Hispanic and Latino Culture And Its Role In Prevention And Healing (Click for Slides) Session Hosted by the National Hispanic and Latino Prevention Technology Transfer Center (NHL PTTC). Session 4: How We Can Culturally Navigate Between The Two Communities (Click for Slides) Session Co-hosted by the National Hispanic and Latino Prevention Technology Transfer Center (NHL PTTC) and the National American Indian & Alaska Native Prevention Technology Transfer Center (NAI/AN PTTC).
Published: August 5, 2020
Multimedia
Mental health professionals are bracing for what may be an epidemic of clinical depression related to COVID-19. In this webinar, Dr. Jonathan Kanter will: 1. Review the science on risk factors for depression that cause this grave warning, 2. Share the latest information on how individuals are responding to the current crisis, and 3. Propose best practices for depression prevention and treatment moving forward. Although actual rates of future depression are hard to predict, organizations will need innovative and scalable solutions, given that our mental health services delivery systems are underpowered to meet demands before this crisis. The presentation will highlight online strategies that include disseminating evidence-based mental health tips, identifying and targeting risk groups, and conducting stepped-care treatment groups, stepping to individual treatment as needed.   Presenter  Dr. Jonathan Kanter is Director of the University of Washington’s Center for the Science of Social Connection. Over the course of his career, Dr. Kanter has investigated psychosocial interventions for depression, including how to disseminate culturally appropriate, easy-to-train, evidence-based approaches, with emphasis on evidence-based treatments such as Behavioral Activation for groups who lack resources and access to care. More recently, the Center has produced research on how to improve relationships and social connectedness and on relational processes that predict relational well-being and quality of life. Dr. Kanter has published over 100 scientific papers and 9 books on these topics and his work has been funded by NIH, SAMHSA, state governmental organizations, foundations, and private donors. He is regularly invited to give talks and workshops nationally and internationally. When the COVID-19 crisis hit Seattle, the Center pivoted its resources to understand and mitigate the relational and mental health consequences of the crisis, to assist with public health efforts, and to inform the public dialogue with scientifically informed advice. Dr. Kanter has been asked to comment on the relational and mental health consequences of the crisis by, and the Center’s response to the crisis has been featured on, NPR, the BBC, the New York Times, the Huffington Post, National Geographic, and other local and national news outlets. PPT_ClinicalDepressionandCOVID19_Kanter_6.11.20 Transcript_ClinicalDepressionandCOVID19_Kanter_6.11.20
Published: June 29, 2020
Multimedia
Scope of Prevention 5-Part Webinar Series Part 3 of 5 Preventing Relapse by Providing Comprehensive Oral Health Care with Substance Use Disorder Treatment The University of Utah, School of Dentistry has demonstrated an important role for oral health in managing substance-use disorder patients by identifying dramatic increases in treatment length of stay, their ability to obtain employment, as well as a decrease in their homelessness and drug-use, by providing comprehensive dental care as an integrated part of their substance-use management. This webinar will highlight the School of Dentistry's program and provide discussion of research, findings, and implications.  PDF Slides Presenter: Glen Hanson, PhD, DDS
Published: August 28, 2019
Copyright © 2024 Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC) Network
envelopephone-handsetmap-markermagnifiercrossmenuchevron-down