Products and Resources Catalog

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eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The May 2024 issue features content celebrating Mental Health Awareness Month, Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Hepatitis C Awareness Month, and National Prevention Week. You will also find links to upcoming trainings focused on the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery, prevention efforts in rural communities, and trauma-informed care for transition-age youth. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: May 10, 2024
Multimedia
Syndemic Solutions Josh Esrick, MPP, Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip, and Olivia Stuart, LMSW January 18, 2024, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION The term “syndemics” describes the relationship between two or more epidemics which often cluster together (e.g., substance misuse and HIV) and have shared social and environmental drivers. When these epidemics interact, they mutually exacerbate the negative effects of each condition, thereby worsening health outcomes. The syndemics framework recognizes the importance of addressing these interactions and seeks to implement a whole-person, integrated model of prevention and care in collaboration with other health care providers. These services focus on equity by putting people first and providing the services that people express interest in receiving. It also seeks to address shared population-level risk and protective factors that influence the co-occurring epidemics that can lead to health inequities. While the concepts of co-occurring epidemics and social determinants driving health outcomes are not new to the field of prevention, syndemics is an emerging framework that many prevention practitioners may be unfamiliar with. This 90-minute webinar will provide participants with an overview of the syndemics framework and its growing use in the field of prevention. It will explain the relationship between the syndemics framework and a public health approach to prevention, the importance of leveraging policy as a public health tool to address syndemic risk factors, and how to build collaborative partnerships between prevention professionals and other health-focused entities to better address syndemics. It will also review the importance of the social determinants of health to syndemics and recommend strategies to support the prevention workforce in improving health outcomes. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Define the concept of the syndemics framework and provide examples of different syndemics Explain how the syndemics framework is interrelated with a public health approach to prevention and the social determinants of health Describe how partnerships and collaboration can help prevention professionals adopt the syndemics framework Identify opportunities for prevention professionals to address syndemics PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is the Chief of Training and Technical Assistance at Carnevale Associates, LLC. Mr. Esrick has over ten years of experience researching, writing, evaluating, and presenting on substance use prevention and other behavioral health topics. He is an expert in providing training and technical assistance (T/TA) in substance use, having overseen the development of hundreds of T/TA products for numerous clients, including six of SAMHSA’s ten regional Prevention Technology Transfer Centers (PTTCs), the PTTC Network Coordinating Office, the Central East Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) and Mental Health Technology Transfer Centers (MHTTC), and SAMHSA’s Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT). These trainings and products have covered a wide range of topics, including strategic planning, data collection and analysis, and identifying evidence-based prevention interventions for youth. In addition to T/TA, Mr. Esrick has directly provided many of these services to behavioral health agencies and other entities. He has published several academic journal articles. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a Master of Public Policy from George Washington University.   Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.     Olivia Stuart, MSW  supports the training & technical assistance (T/TA) team in the development and delivery of knowledge translation products across multiple projects. In this capacity, she assists with webinars, literature reviews, and infographics on a range of behavioral health topics. Prior to joining Carnevale Associates, Olivia interned with the Urban Institute’s Justice Policy Center where she supported projects to reduce inequities in the criminal justice system. Olivia also served as a Graduate Research Supervisor at George Mason University and worked for several years in LGBTQ+ advocacy and fundraising. She holds a Master of Social Work degree from George Mason University.  
Published: January 18, 2024
Print Media
Addressing and preventing the spread of substance use disorders (SUDs) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are both vital areas of public health. Many risk factors are shared across SUD and HIV, though each present unique challenges. This product summarizes the scope of HIV in the United States and SAMHAS Region 3. It also discusses how having HIV can increase risk of substance use and how engaging in substance use can increase risk of HIV. It also shares examples of evidence-based prevention programs.
Published: August 21, 2023
Multimedia
Recording link: Nexus of Substance Misuse Prevention and Problem Gambling Prevention   The focus of this webinar is on the nexus between substance misuse prevention and problem gambling prevention. Gambling disorders are highly comorbid with other mental health and substance use disorders. The prevalence of co-occurring gambling addiction and substance abuse is high. Approximately 1 in 10 compulsive gamblers report being concerned about their substance use.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Discuss the complex relationship between problem gambling and substance misuse. List shared risk and protective factors between problem gambling and substance misuse disorders List the barriers to collaboration between the problem gambling prevention field and substance misuse prevention Describe collaboration strategies for substance use prevention professionals and the problem gambling prevention field to improve public health and community conditions.   PRESENTER:  Rebecca Bishop, MSW Director, Massachusetts Center of Excellence for Problem Gambling Rebecca Bishop specializes in initiatives to improve the health, mental health, and well-being of youth and high-risk populations. She brings expertise in mental health promotion, health equity, cultural and linguistic responsiveness, community mobilization, and violence prevention and intervention. Bishop has a history of applying a health and racial equity lens to substance use, youth development, violence and problem gambling prevention, as well as mental health issues. She leads EDC’s Gambling Prevention Technical Assistance Center and has managed three regional planning processes across Massachusetts to learn about local knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes related to gambling, resulting in population-specific prevention strategies. Bishop holds an MA in Social Work, Health, and Mental Health Administration from Boston College Graduate School of Social Work and has a Certificate in Nonprofit Management and Leadership.   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC offered this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training was provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.  
Published: June 29, 2022
Multimedia
Recording link: Nexus of Substance Misuse Prevention and Suicide Prevention   The focus of this session is on the nexus between substance misuse prevention and suicide prevention efforts. While multiple factors influence suicidal behaviors, substance use—especially alcohol use—is a significant factor that is linked to a substantial number of suicides and suicide attempts.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Discuss the complex relationship between suicide and substance misuse. List shared risk and protective factors between suicide and substance misuse disorders List the barriers to collaboration between the suicide prevention field and substance misuse prevention Describe collaboration strategies for substance use prevention professionals and the suicide prevention field to improve public health and community conditions.   PRESENTERS:  Jana Boocock, MSW Jana Boocock is a Senior Prevention Specialist on the Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) project. Jana’s primary experience includes managing the implementation of suicide and substance use prevention programming in South Dakota communities. Jana received her Master of Social Work in 2021 from Arizona State University and is a Certified Addiction Counselor and Certified Prevention Specialist. In addition to her state and community led prevention experience, Jana also has experience working with youth and adults experiencing behavioral health disorders within the community.   Alex Karydi Alex Karydi leads and provides technical assistance for the Suicide Prevention Resource Center’s States and Communities Initiative. Before joining EDC, she served as the Director of Project 2025 at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and was the director of the Callen-Lorde Community Health Center’s Certified Community Behavioral Health Clinic, a global leader in LGBTQ healthcare. Karydi is a certified addictions counselor and a licensed marriage and family therapist. Fluent in French and English, Alex holds a PhD in Marriage and Family Therapy from Northcentral University and a PhD in Clinical Sexology from the American Academy of Clinical Sexology.
Published: May 31, 2022
Multimedia
September 13, 2021 Course Description Addressing the use of multiple substance at one time, or polysubstance use, represents an untapped opportunity in prevention, given its prevalence, related consequences and impact on communities.   This virtual learning event featuring explores current definitions of polysubstance use, national and regional polysubstance use data trends, challenges around (and possible solutions to) enhancing polysubstance use-related surveillance efforts, evidence-based risk factors for polysubstance use, and ways to maximize efficiency by applying cross-substance best practices in our prevention efforts.    Supplemental Material Transcript PowerPoint
Published: November 18, 2021
Curriculum Package
While mental health and SUDs affect people from all walks of life and all age groups, people with these disorders interact disproportionately with members of the police force, fire department, and emergency medical services. Individuals with severe mental illness generate no fewer than 1 in 10 calls for police service.  Police transport an estimated 1 in 3 individuals in psychiatric crisis to hospital emergency rooms.  Frequent and repeated encounters with individuals struggling with mental health, substance use, and related behavioral health problems can produce compassion fatigue in first responders and perpetuate the misconceptions that individuals with mental illness are dangerous and/or that SUD is a moral failing. Training and education in substance use and mental health disorders can help first responders understand how stigmatizing attitudes and language can interfere with quality of care.    Click the "download" button above to access:  Slide Deck: Preventing and Reducing Stigma–First Responders  Two-Pager: Preventing and Reducing Stigma–First Responders   Related Products Podcast: Listen to Spotlight on Stigma Episode 1: The Role of First Responders Web Page: Preventing and Reducing Stigma     
Published: November 12, 2020
Curriculum Package
According to the 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, about 8 out of 10 people with a mental health condition reported experiencing shame and stigma that prevented them from seeking treatment. Stigma can be defined as an attribute, behavior, or condition that socially discredits an individual or populations in various capacities. Stigma disproportionately influences health outcomes and psychological well-being of individuals with mental health and SUD. Prevention practitioners are in a unique position to reduce the stigma surrounding substance misuse.   Click "download" above to access: Preventing and Reducing Stigma: Prevention Slide Deck Two-pager Related Resources Website: Preventing and Reducing Stigma         
Published: November 12, 2020
Curriculum Package
Law enforcement personnel frequently interact with people with mental illness and SUD because these populations are disproportionately represented in jails and overall within the criminal justice system. Law enforcement personnel have to exercise substantial judgment about mental illness and SUD since law enforcement frequently serves as a gatekeeper between the criminal justice system and mental health systems. Law enforcement personnel would benefit from a greater understanding of various psychiatric conditions, mental health issues, SUDs, and their co-occurrence.    Click "download" above to access: Preventing and Reducing Stigma in Law Enforcement Slide Deck Preventing and Reducing Stigma in Law Enforcement Two-Pager Related resources Web Page: Preventing and Reducing Stigma         
Published: November 12, 2020
Curriculum Package
Healthcare is defined as an organized system that strives to maintain or improve health by delivering services focused on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, and recovery. Healthcare professionals are a central part of this system, where they strive to improve access and quality health care. Healthcare professionals, specifically providers, may be concerned about their patient's SUD and how to provide quality care in treating it. Yet inadequate training, knowledge, or support structures for providers contribute to the stigmatization of people with SUD, resulting in poor quality of care and lower patient engagement and care retention levels.   Click the "download" button above to access:  Preventing and Reducing Stigma Slide Deck: Healthcare Fact Sheet: Preventing and Reducing Stigma–Healthcare Related Products Website: Preventing and Reducing Stigma          
Published: November 12, 2020
Curriculum Package
Most Americans are part of a religious institution, which is often the first point of contact for those seeking help with a mental health or substance use problem. Religious institutions offer support for these individuals in an environment that respects their culture and values, with some studies finding that religious involvement is a protective factor for mental health and substance use. At the same time, religious beliefs about mental illness and substance misuse can lead to stigma, shame, and isolation if the illnesses are viewed as the result of sinful behavior or lack of faith.   Click the "Download" button above to access: The Preventing and Reducing Stigma: Faith Leaders Slide Deck  The Preventing and Reducing Stigma: Faith Leaders Two-Pager Engaging the Faith Community in Substance Use Prevention: Rationale for Partnering and Resources to Support Your Efforts   Related Products Podcast: Spotlight on Stigma Episode 2: The Role of Faith Leaders Web Page: Visit the Great Lakes PTTC Preventing and Reducing Stigma webpage!            
Published: November 9, 2020
Curriculum Package
Few teaching and training programs adequately prepare educators and staff to work with students who have a mental health or SUD.  Many training programs may perpetuate misconceptions about these students' needs. When they do not perform well, students with behavioral health issues can be labeled as "bad," furthering the disconnection. Early intervention and trajectory set the stage for interactions around mental health. Schools are often the first contact for students with SUD/mental illness. De-stigmatizing mental illness and SUD can allow students to get the educational accommodations and supports they need.    Click "download" above to access: The Preventing and Reducing Stigma: Education Slide Deck The Preventing and Reducing Stigma: Education Fact Sheet    Related Resources Web Page: Preventing and Reducing Stigma     
Published: November 9, 2020
Curriculum Package
People with mental health and SUDs are overrepresented in the criminal justice system. More than half of all inmates in the U.S. have a mental illness. Individuals with mental illness are more likely to experience multiple arrests and incarcerations. In most states, people with mental illness reside in prisons or jails than in state-operated psychiatric facilities. Perceived and structural stigma plays a specific role in the criminal justice system. Click "download" above to access: The Preventing and Reducing Stigma: Criminal Justice Slide Deck The Preventing and Reducing Stigma: Criminal Justice Two-pager Related Resources Web Page: Preventing and Reducing Stigma    
Published: November 8, 2020
Curriculum Package
People with mental health and substance use disorder experience high rates of discrimination in employment. Few protections exist for people with mental health or SUD who experience discrimination in employment.   Click "download" above to access: The Preventing and Reducing Stigma: Business slide deck The Preventing and Reducing Stigma: Two-pager Related Resources  Preventing and Reducing Stigma web page        
Published: November 7, 2020
Curriculum Package
Mental health and substance use disorders (SUD) are among the most common chronic health conditions in the United States. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health reports that 61.2 million American adults—almost one in five—experienced either an SUD or any mental illness in 2019. Despite the prevalence of these conditions, the stigma associated with substance use or mental health disorders presents a barrier to treatment.   Click "download" above to access  The Preventing and Reducing Stigma: Behavioral Health Slide Deck The Preventing and Reducing Stigma: Behavioral Health Info Sheet   Related Resources Web Page: Preventing and Reducing Stigma      
Published: November 7, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
Electronic newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. 
Published: March 5, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
January 2020 issue of the Great Lakes Current, the newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. 
Published: January 22, 2020
Multimedia
Scope of Prevention 5-Part Webinar Series Part 2 of 5 Selective and Indicated School-Based Prevention Interventions for Students in Secondary School This webinar will discuss prevention efforts for students who are at risk or currently use substances or have mental health issues. Topics will include therapeutic options ranging from group therapy, individual counseling, and are informed by screening and progress monitoring of pertinent data. PDF Slides Presenter: Aaron Fischer, PhD, BCBA-D
Published: August 28, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
The May 2019 issue of The Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: co-occurring disorders and drug courts (#mentalhealthmonth); Mental Health: improving organizational effectiveness to better serve older adults (#olderamericansmonth); Prevention: preventing tobacco and vaping use among youth; ORN: drug court alumni support groups; and Spotlight: SAMHSA's National Prevention Week. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news.   The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. If you would like to be added to our mailing list to receive the Dialogue, news, and training announcements, sign up here.
Published: May 14, 2019
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