Products and Resources Catalog

Center
Product Type
Target Audience
Language
Keywords
Date Range
Multimedia
Stigma and Substance Use Prevention Part 2: Strategies and Recommendations for the Field of Prevention Josh Esrick, MPP, and Olivia Stuart, LMSW May 30, 2024, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will provide information on available evidence-based and culturally responsive prevention strategies for addressing youth vaping, cannabis, and tobacco use. It will cover both environmental and behavioral interventions, as well as opportunities to implement or expand policies that can address the social determinants of health. This will include reviewing opportunities to expand the role of prevention in legislative and regulatory decision-making related to these substances. Lastly, it will describe how to ensure cultural responsiveness is incorporated into youth substance use prevention efforts and programming. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Recognize the importance of providing evidence-based culturally responsive youth vaping, cannabis, and tobacco use prevention strategies Describe evidence-based behavioral strategies for preventing youth vaping, cannabis, and tobacco use Describe evidence-based environmental strategies for addressing social determinants of health relevant to youth vaping, cannabis, and tobacco use Explain how to ensure cultural responsiveness in youth substance use prevention programs PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is the Chief of Training and Technical Assistance at Carnevale Associates, LLC. Mr. Esrick has over ten years of experience researching, writing, evaluating, and presenting on substance use prevention and other behavioral health topics. He is an expert in providing training and technical assistance (T/TA) in substance use, having overseen the development of hundreds of T/TA products for numerous clients, including six of SAMHSA’s ten regional Prevention Technology Transfer Centers (PTTCs), the PTTC Network Coordinating Office, the Central East Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) and Mental Health Technology Transfer Centers (MHTTC), and SAMHSA’s Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT). These trainings and products have covered a wide range of topics, including strategic planning, data collection and analysis, and identifying evidence-based prevention interventions for youth. In addition to T/TA, Mr. Esrick has directly provided many of these services to behavioral health agencies and other entities. He has published several academic journal articles. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a Master of Public Policy from George Washington University.     Olivia Stuart, MSW supports the training & technical assistance (T/TA) team in the development and delivery of knowledge translation products across multiple projects. In this capacity, she assists with webinars, literature reviews, and infographics on a range of behavioral health topics. Prior to joining Carnevale Associates, Olivia interned with the Urban Institute’s Justice Policy Center where she supported projects to reduce inequities in the criminal justice system. Olivia also served as a Graduate Research Supervisor at George Mason University and worked for several years in LGBTQ+ advocacy and fundraising. She holds a Master of Social Work degree from George Mason University.    
Published: May 30, 2024
Multimedia
Stigma and Substance Use Prevention Part 1: Identifying and Understanding the Data Josh Esrick, MPP, and Olivia Stuart, LMSW May 28, 2024, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will provide a broad overview of the current state of youth vaping, cannabis, and tobacco use. It will begin by reviewing the most common data sources for youth substance use and discuss opportunities to improve and expand data collection efforts. The webinar will then summarize the most recent data on youth vaping, cannabis, and tobacco use prevalence and consequences at the national level and for the Central East region. It will also describe the research on risk and protective factors for youth vaping, cannabis, and tobacco use. Lastly, it will provide information on how the social determinants of health play a role in youth use of these substances. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Describe youth substance use data sources and opportunities to expand data collection Explain the scope of youth vaping, cannabis, and tobacco use and consequences in the Central East region and nationally Identify risk and protective factors relevant to youth vaping, cannabis, and tobacco use Recognize the effect of the social determinants of health on youth vaping, cannabis, and tobacco use PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is the Chief of Training and Technical Assistance at Carnevale Associates, LLC. Mr. Esrick has over ten years of experience researching, writing, evaluating, and presenting on substance use prevention and other behavioral health topics. He is an expert in providing training and technical assistance (T/TA) in substance use, having overseen the development of hundreds of T/TA products for numerous clients, including six of SAMHSA’s ten regional Prevention Technology Transfer Centers (PTTCs), the PTTC Network Coordinating Office, the Central East Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) and Mental Health Technology Transfer Centers (MHTTC), and SAMHSA’s Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT). These trainings and products have covered a wide range of topics, including strategic planning, data collection and analysis, and identifying evidence-based prevention interventions for youth. In addition to T/TA, Mr. Esrick has directly provided many of these services to behavioral health agencies and other entities. He has published several academic journal articles. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a Master of Public Policy from George Washington University. Olivia Stuart, MSW supports the training & technical assistance (T/TA) team in the development and delivery of knowledge translation products across multiple projects. In this capacity, she assists with webinars, literature reviews, and infographics on a range of behavioral health topics. Prior to joining Carnevale Associates, Olivia interned with the Urban Institute’s Justice Policy Center where she supported projects to reduce inequities in the criminal justice system. Olivia also served as a Graduate Research Supervisor at George Mason University and worked for several years in LGBTQ+ advocacy and fundraising. She holds a Master of Social Work degree from George Mason University.    
Published: May 28, 2024
Podcast
Nathan Wray a Prevention Coordinator for the Roane County Anti-drug Coalition in Tennessee. He’s also a highly sought after motivational speaker whose life story is nothing short of inspirational. Nathan speaks from the perspective of lived experience, in hopes of empowering youth, and his story is a powerful testament to the human spirit's resilience. Nathan’s message combines his passion for change with a sense of humor that connects with the audience to make a lasting impact. In his spare time, he hangs out with his four kids and his beautiful life. Website: https://www.nathanwrayspeaks.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thatnathanwray/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nwrayspeaks/
Published: April 29, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The latest edition of our bi-monthly newsletter is available. This month’s edition features a PTTC network event "Climate Change from a Prevention Perspective", Exploring Root Causes of Substance Misuse through Stories, Alcohol Awareness Month and awareness campaigns for April, and regionally and nationally developed events and tools to support and grow the prevention workforce in New England. View the newsletter.
Published: April 11, 2024
Toolkit
  Prevention Success Video Series   This video series highlights several initiatives from across New England following evidence-informed prevention practices to develop effective prevention programs. Through interviews, you will see examples of how these prevention practitioners use prevention science to identify and address a need in their communities, and the power of prevention science to create change.    How can you use this resource? This resource is intended to provide real examples of how prevention initiatives are planned and implemented and the impact that effective prevention programs can have. For people who are new to the prevention field, either as staff, volunteers, coalition members, or other community members, these videos can be a tool to demonstrate what prevention is and can do. For those who have been in the prevention field, these videos provide examples to expand the possibilities for how prevention science can be used in different settings to address different types of challenges. DOWNLOAD THE VIDEO SERIES OVERVIEW.   COLLEGE CAMPUS GAMBLING PREVENTION INITIATIVE   Interview with Mallory Schultz, MPH, Prevention and Training Coordinator, Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling    The Connecticut College Campus Gambling Prevention Initiative is a pilot program to provide education and resources for colleges and universities to deliver problem gambling prevention information to the student population. Youth and young adults represent a growing population affected by problem gambling, and this program seeks to empower colleges to address problem gambling along with substance use and mental health. For more information: https://ccpg.org/     INCREDIBLE YEARS Interview with Tamar Dalcé Coles, M.Ed., Incredible Years Grant Coordinator 2021-2023, Rhode Island Regional Coalitions The Incredible Years Series is an evidence-based curriculum to address social-emotional learning for parents, teachers, and children. They are designed to work jointly to promote emotional, social, and academic competence and to prevent, reduce, and treat behavioral and emotional problems in young children. This program has been used as an upstream prevention strategy in two Rhode Island communities, to support parents and teachers of young children and promote healthy development. For more information: https://riprevention.org/upstreamprevention/      LGBTQ+ YOUTH TOBACCO PREVENTION INITIATIVE Interview with Joanne Joy, Senior Program Manager, and April Hughes, Associate Program Manager, Healthy Communities of the Capital Area.  Recognizing a need for more data and information on tobacco use and prevention among LGBTQ+ youth, community partners conducted a needs assessment to learn more about this issue. Using what was learned, HCCA and community partners developed new initiatives to support LGBTQ+ youth and promote prevention which continue to grow and evolve with the needs of the community. For more information: https://hccame.org/lgbtq-youth-support/      About this product: This video series was developed by the New England (HHS Region 1) Prevention Technology Transfer Center in response to highlights several initiatives from across New England following evidence-informed prevention practices within CT, MA, ME, NH, RI and VT about the field of prevention. The New England Prevention Technology Transfer Center program is funded by SAMHSA of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of New England PTTC products are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by SAMHSA/HHS, or the U.S. Government. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by SAMHSA/HHS, or the U.S. Government.   For additional questions about this product, please contact Kristen Erickson [email protected]
Published: January 10, 2024
Print Media
Youth vaping is a significant public health concern with disproportionate impacts across different populations. They likely stem from inequities in vaping risk factors and the social determinants of health. Prevention professionals should identify the populations in their communities most impacted by vaping and develop tailored prevention services. This product provides data on the disparities in vaping prevalence rates and information on how to use a lens of cultural humility in developing prevention services.
Published: October 16, 2023
Multimedia
  This webinar will cover the products typically utilized in vape devices, such as THC. We will also discuss the components and constituents and associated health risks. Finally, we will discuss available some resources for helping people quit smoking or vaping.   Learning Objectives: Participants will increase their understanding of vape function and product usage. Participants will be able to restate the risks of vaping after the event. Participants will map policy concerns about vaping for their state/region. Participants will be able to find and recommend resources for their clients.   About the Presenter: Dr. Mary Martinasek is an Associate Professor in Public Health at the University of Tampa. She is also a registered respiratory therapist, a certified asthma educator, a tobacco treatment and health education specialist. Mary’s research is focused on hookah smoking and vaping electronic nicotine delivery devices; however, she also conducted a systematic review on the respiratory effects of inhalational marijuana. Her recent manuscripts have focused on the relationship of Adverse Childhood Experiences as predictors of vaping and tobacco use, asthma and vaping, and social marketing campaigns for hookah reduction.  
Published: March 17, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The latest edition of our bi-monthly newsletter is available. This month’s edition features growing prevention careers together, a focus on cannabis prevention, stories of substance misuse prevention and resilience, the application is open for the next Project ECHO, awareness campaigns for the month of June, and regionally and nationally developed events and tools to support and grow the prevention workforce in New England. View the newsletter.
Published: June 13, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The latest edition of our bi-monthly newsletter is available. This month’s edition features our re-formatted vaping prevention courses into a microlearning toolkit, upcoming national public education campaigns, the summer internship application deadline is May 1st, the PTTC Network's NEW Map: Compilation of Prevention Specialist Certification Requirements, SAMHSA Marijuana infographic, and regionally and nationally developed events and tools to support and grow the prevention workforce in New England. View the newsletter.
Published: April 12, 2022
Multimedia
          Brush up on your knowledge with this series of short lessons on vaping and prevention! Each lesson consists of a 5-10 minute video followed by a brief quiz. Topics include: effects of nicotine on the adolescent brain, public health implications of youth ENDS use and why vaping/e-cigarette use appeals to youth.   How to use: Complete the lessons yourself to increase your knowledge or share these lessons with your coalition members, for parent or youth education programs, or with others in your community. Lessons can be viewed in the online quiz format through the links below, or can be taught along with the discussion guide available for download to use with a group.   Option 1: Online Quiz Format To complete the lessons using the online quiz format, follow the link to each lesson below.   Nicotine and the Adolescent Brain How does nicotine use affect the adolescent brain and development? What are potential short and long-term effects of nicotine use during adolescence?   Neurobiology of Nicotine and Cannabis What happens in the brain when nicotine or cannabis are used in vapes or e-cigarettes?   Appeal of JUUL among Adolescents What motivates young people to vape and why do some products appeal more than others?   Public Health Concerns of Youth E-Cigarette Use What are the public health considerations of youth e-cigarette use? How might that differ from adult use?   Option 2: Discussion Guide To use the lessons with a group in a discussion format, follow the discussion guide below. Each lesson includes a link to the video, followed by a set of discussion questions and answers.     Lesson 1: Nicotine and the Adolescent Brain How does nicotine affect the adolescent brain? How does it affect development and does it have any long-term impacts?   Watch the video   Discussion Questions How does nicotine use at a young age relate to substance use later in life? What are the effects of nicotine on the adolescent brain? Can nicotine use lead to feelings of withdrawal? Answers Use of any substance, including nicotine found in e-cigarettes/vaping devices, as an adolescent increases risk of substance use disorder later in life. According to one study, 17% of people who first used marijuana at age 13 went on to develop a substance use disorder, compared to only 4% of people who first used marijuana after age 21, meaning those who used earlier were 4 times more likely to develop a substance use disorder. Research from both human and animal studies shows that early exposure to nicotine while the brain is still developing is associated with impairments in attention and working memory as well as risk for mood disorders and impulse control problems, along with increased risk for development of a substance use disorder. Stopping the use of nicotine can lead to withdrawal symptoms as quickly as 4 hours after cessation, and gradually taper off over 3-4 weeks of cessation.   Learn more New England PTTC Vaping Prevention Resources and Information In the Air is a graphic medicine built to foster conversations with and among young people around vaping, choices about substance use, and social factors. Available in English, Spanish and Portuguese. A New England PTTC product. Tips for Teens: E-Cigarettes - Resource from SAMHSA Reducing Vaping Among Youth and Young Adults - Resource from SAMHSA     Lesson 2: Neurobiology of Nicotine and Cannabis What happens in the brain when cannabis is used in vapes or e-cigarettes? Language note: In this guide, we have used the term cannabis to refer to cannabis/marijuana. If you are using this guide with an audience who may be more familiar with another term, either marijuana or a different term, please substitute that word as needed.   Watch the video Discussion Questions What are some of the chemicals that make up a cannabis product? What are some of the short-term effects of cannabis use? Is it possible to become addicted to cannabis? Which vaping products contain higher potency chemicals? Answers THC (delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol) are the two most common of the 500 chemicals found within the cannabis plant. THC is the psychoactive component that causes the “high” feeling and can impair cognitive and motor function. THC is illegal on the federal level but legal for medical or adult-use in many states. Short term effects of cannabis use may include a heightened sense of perception, poor attention and judgement, increased anxiety or paranoia, or decreased pain, among other effects. Yes, Cannabis Use Disorder is the term for a disorder in which a person is reliant on cannabis use. Just as a person may become dependent on alcohol or nicotine, especially with frequent use, a person can also become dependent on cannabis. A person with cannabis use disorder may experience withdrawal symptoms like irritability, restlessness, difficulty sleeping, and hot flashes Both nicotine and cannabis vaping products can contain very high potency chemicals. For example, a typical vaping pod or cartridge may contain the equivalent of 1 pack of cigarettes and can be consumed very rapidly. Likewise, the typical concentration of THC in a vaping cartridge can be 6-8 times higher than the concentration of a typical smoked product.   Learn more Cannabis/Marijuana Use Disorder Prevention and Youth Cannabis Use Toolkit (PTTC Network) Marijuana & Vaping - The Triangulum: The Future is Now     Lesson 3: Appeal of JUUL among Adolescents How does cannabis use impact driving and road safety? This lesson reviews the impacts of cannabis use on road safety and policy and enforcement considerations in states with and without legalized cannabis.   Watch the video   Discussion Questions What did adolescents report as the top reasons for liking JUUL or vaping products? What reasons did adolescents provide for not liking JUUL or vaping products? What regulatory policies would these findings support to address vape use among adolescents? Answers In the study discussed in this video, which surveyed high school students in Connecticut about their views on vaping, students reported that they liked JUUL primarily because they like the “buzz,” their friends use it, and they like the flavors. Students who reported that they liked the “buzz” also reported more frequent use of vaping products. On the other hand, the most common reasons students reported disliking JUUL or vaping products were because they are too expensive, they have too much nicotine, or it gives them headaches. This study provides some useful insight into policy and environmental strategies to reduce adolescent vaping. For example, it suggests limiting nicotine content and flavor options may help reduce adolescent use. Increasing taxes or the price of vaping products may also help reduce adolescent use. Learn more Kong, G., Bold, K. W., Morean, M. E., Bhatti, H., Camenga, D. R., Jackson, A., & Krishnan-Sarin, S. (2019). Appeal of JUUL among adolescents. Drug and alcohol dependence, 205, 107691. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2019.107691. Abstract accessible at: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31706249/     Lesson 4: Public Health Concerns of Youth E-Cigarette Use What are the public health considerations of youth e-cigarette use? How might that differ from adult use?   Watch the video   Discussion Questions What are some of the major public health concerns of youth vaping/e-cigarette use? Are e-cigarettes an FDA-approved tobacco cessation product? How does exposure to nicotine and other chemicals differ between e-cigarettes and combustible cigarettes? Answers exposure at an early age can be detrimental to brain development and lead to nicotine dependence. There is also an increased risk that adolescents who start using vaping products will transition to combustible tobacco products (cigarettes, etc.). Another major risk is exposure to toxicants within the e-cigarette products. The FDA has not currently approved e-cigarette/vaping products as a tobacco cessation product for adults or adolescents. Some other countries, such as the United Kingdom, have approved certain vaping devices for tobacco cessation for adults, although typically with lower limits on the allowable nicotine content. Compared to combustible cigarettes, e-cigarettes contain fewer and lower levels of toxicants. However, people tend to use e-cigarettes more frequently throughout the day, so their exposure to chemicals contained in e-cigarette products can be high.   Learn more New England PTTC Vaping Prevention Resources and Information The Stanford Vaping Prevention Toolkit   Interested in learning more about cannabis prevention? Check out our Microlearning Toolkit: Cannabis Prevention 101.
Published: March 23, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
In this Issue: Preventing Youth from Commercial Tobacco and Emerging Products Initiation Tobacco Prevention Awareness in November Epi Corner: Promoting Adolescent Mental Health: The Risks and Benefits of Social Media Celebrating and Honoring Native American Heritage Month Veterans Day What's Happening Around the Region? Ditching the Discomfort with Data Series: Part One Overview, November 18 HealtheKnowledge Online Course Spotlight
Published: November 17, 2021
Multimedia
  The Great Lakes PTTC offers this training for prevention practitioners and behavioral health professionals in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, and WI. This training is offered in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders. The good news is that during 2019-2020, among middle and high school students, current use of any tobacco product, including e-cigarettes, cigars, and smokeless tobacco decreased. Two-thirds of young people report that they have either cut down or quit during lockdown, while others found new ways to obtain e-cigarettes online. While these declines offer some relief, the number of young people using e-cigarettes remain high. This webinar will provide an update on vaping and evidence-based prevention practices. We will also share discuss promising approaches that we have emerged in the last year from surveys and research.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES  Describe a brief history of vaping in the US Identify evidence-based prevention strategies and promising approaches for prevention List cross-sector approaches for comprehensive vaping prevention    PRESENTER Chuck Klevgaard serves as a prevention manager to the Great Lakes Prevention Technology Transfer Center.  He delivers training and technical assistance to support substance misuse prevention throughout the Midwest. Chuck has supported communities and health agencies as they adopt evidence-based alcohol, opioid, and other substance misuse programs or policies. Chuck earned his BSW from Minnesota State University Moorhead. He is a Certified Senior Prevention Specialist through the Illinois Certification Board, Inc.    
Published: July 6, 2021
Multimedia
LGBTQ Youth Tobacco Prevention: COVID-19 and Lung Vulnerability Kate Bishop, MSSA December 9, 2020, 1-2 PM EST   COURSE DESCRIPTION LGBTQ populations are at higher risk for COVID-19 due in part to wildly disproportionate rates of smoking, vaping, and other forms of tobacco use. Tobacco dependence usually starts in adolescence, and studies have shown LGBTQ youth are especially vulnerable to substance misuse, predatory ad campaigns, and peer influence. This webinar will explore the rates, risks, and intersections of tobacco use and the novel coronavirus among queer and gender expansive teens and young adults. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Review current data on LGBTQ youth, tobacco use, and COVID-19. Examine the lung health impacts of COVID-19, smoking, and vaping in adolescents. Describe the unique vulnerabilities of LGBTQ youth that influence tobacco use. Explore best practices to support LGBTQ young people in avoiding or quitting their use of tobacco products. PRESENTER Kate Bishop, MSSA, the Education Coordinator at the LGBT Health Resource Center of Chase Brexton, is a seasoned professional development trainer with expertise in working with LGBTQ populations, sexual and reproductive health care, adolescent development, intimate partner violence, and sexual trauma. She is certified as a trainer through GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network) as well as SAGE (Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders). Before joining the Chase Brexton team, she developed the capacity building program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s STAR TRACK Adolescent HIV program, providing cultural responsiveness trainings for agencies that serve sexual minority youth of color. Ms. Bishop holds a Bachelor of Arts in Gender Studies from Hiram College and a Masters in Social Work from Case Western Reserve University. HOSTS This training was developed under the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC), Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (MHTTC), Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC) task orders (Reference #s 1H79TI080210, 3H79SM081785, and 1H79SP081018) and is for training use only. Learn more about the Central East ATTC, Central East MHTTC, and Central East PTTC. The Central East ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC are managed by The Danya Institute.
Published: December 9, 2020
Multimedia
  Advocacy Essentials for Prevention Practitioners: Tools for Impacting Substance-Related Policies and Regulations   Webinar Date: November 18, 2020   Webinar Description Join us for this interactive webinar on the importance of advocating for policies and regulations that improve substance misuse outcomes in your communities. This webinar will provide an overview of the difference between advocacy and lobbying, current research on policies and regulations that are often adopted with little public health input, and what tools are available to prevention practitioners to ensure they are providing a voice in the regulatory process. The webinar will conclude with a real-life example of an advocacy campaign that was successful in creating local policy change in a community in Arizona.   Presenters Mary Segawa, M.S., Mary has worked in community and statewide prevention and public policy for over 20 years. In her role as the Public Health Education Liaison at the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board where she worked closely with other state agencies and community organizations to coordinate prevention efforts, provide training, and develop resources. Mary played a key role in promoting public health policy at the WSLCB as they implemented the two citizen initiatives that privatized liquor and legalized cannabis. Prior to her work at the WSLCB she served as Executive Director of a county-wide non-profit agency focused on prevention of youth substance use and violence. Mary is now working as an independent contractor. She recently received the National Prevention Network’s 2020 Award of Excellence.   Julie J. Craig, Director of Community Initiatives, Arizona Youth Partnership. Julie started her career working as an Emergency Medical Technician while attending the University of Arizona in Tucson, Az. From there she worked more than 10 years as a Police/Fire 9-1-1 Emergency Dispatcher and this is where her work with Substance Abuse and Community Coalitions began. She has been with the Arizona Youth Partnership for over 13 years and manages several Community Substance Abuse Coalitions in Mohave, Gila and Pinal Counties, and provides Technical Assistance to youth anti-tobacco coalitions across Arizona. She is an Instructor/Trainer in several curriculums including Kids at Hope, Strengthening Families Program 10-14, Too Good for Dugs/Violence, Mind Matters, and PAXT 360. She also provides education to communities regarding underage drinking and Substance abuse issues. Julie lives in rural Arizona on a small ranch where she raises goats, sheep, and donkeys.   Alicia Sparks, PhD, MPH is the Vice Chair of the U.S. Alcohol Policy Alliance and Senior Associate at Abt Associates. Her research focuses on the implementing and evaluating alcohol and other drug prevention policies. Dr. Sparks contributed to the first ever Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health and co-authored an APHA policy statement on the need for alcohol policy in the U.S. She served as a Fellow at the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth and has worked directly with liquor law enforcement organizations on alcohol prevention programs and policies at the state level, as well as with college campuses and local coalitions on implementing effective prevention policies. Dr. Sparks holds a PhD in Public Health from Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and an MPH from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.     Webinar Recording View Webinar   Webinar Slides Download Slides - Advocacy Essentials for Prevention Practitioners: Tools for Impacting Substance-Related Policies and Regulations
Published: December 8, 2020
Multimedia
Central East Webinar Series: Preventing Youth Vaping Part 2: Policy Recommendations and Promising Practices for Addressing Youth Vaping Josh Esrick, MPP, and Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip August 6, 2020, 1-2 PM EST  |  View all Central East series This is part two of a two-part webinar series hosted by the Central East PTTC that focuses on preventing youth vaping and related topics. COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will examine potential policy recommendations and promising practices that may help reduce and prevent youth vaping. Due to the recency of the spread of vaping, there has been insufficient time for research to confirm evidence-based programs that can specifically prevent vaping. However, based on knowledge of the risk factors for vaping, as well as of the evidence-based cigarette and tobacco product use prevention programs, several promising practices exist. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Discuss the current public health response to youth vaping Review challenges to youth vaping prevention Examine potential policy recommendations to prevent youth vaping Identify promising prevention practices to address youth vaping PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing T/TA to numerous organizations. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.               
Published: August 6, 2020
Multimedia
What is the role THC has on the nation’s current vaping crisis? What are the best practices and strategies for vaping prevention? What are specific vaping prevention strategies currently being implemented by two prevention coalitions? This webinar explores these questions and more from national and community experts. The panel discusses the latest data and research on the impact of vaping on youth and communities. FAQ Sheet Coming soon! Download Webinar Slides    
Published: July 1, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
Upcoming PTTC Training Brain Science Techniques and Tobacco Control Measures: A Merging of the Minds   Five Fascinating Brain Science Resources
Published: June 26, 2020
Multimedia
Central East Webinar Series: Preventing Youth Vaping Part 1: The Extent and Risk Factors for Youth Vaping Josh Esrick, MPP, and Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip June 25, 2020, 1-2 PM EST  |  View all Central East series This is part one of a two-part webinar series hosted by the Central East PTTC that focuses on preventing youth vaping and related topics. COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will examine data on the rise and scope of vaping, and how it contrasts with previous tobacco use data. It will also examine the known risk factors that contributed to this rise, such as ease of availability, low perceptions of harm, and lack of environmental strategies to prevent use. The webinar will also discuss the issue and current status of acute lung injuries caused by vaping. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Explain the importance of youth vaping as a prevention priority Explore prevalence data on vaping and tobacco product use Discuss known risk factors for vaping use Identify areas where further research is require PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing T/TA to numerous organizations. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.               
Published: June 25, 2020
Website
This webpage provides an overview of trainings and information related to vaping. It includes regional and national resources. 
Published: April 11, 2020
Multimedia
Learn how one Wisconsin school district partners with the county restorative justice program to to engage with youth caught vaping on school grounds. Featured presenters: Tim Wavrunek, Eau Claire County Restorative Justice Program, and Kim Koller, Director of Administrative Services, Eau Claire School District. Presented on December 11, 2019. 
Published: March 5, 2020
Multimedia
This webinar builds upon MI’s fundamental concepts and continues development of the necessary skills to access motivation and strengthen commitment to change. Presenter Laura A. Saunders, MSSW, is the Wisconsin state project manager for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. Laura is an experienced MI trainer and a member of the international Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers. 
Published: October 10, 2019
Multimedia
Click the buttons below to view this webinar translated in Spanish or Portuguese     On May 9, 2019, the National Hispanic and Latino Prevention Technology Transfer Center provide the Vaping 101: and Latino Youth: Devices, risks, prevention efforts, and solutions, webinar. We invited two presenters. The first one was Mrs. Judy Mezey. She is the Director of Community Based Programs for the Student Assistance Services Corp. Our second guest was Abe Baker-Butler; he is a junior at Blind Brook High School focused on peer-to-peer prevention and legislative advocacy. The webinar provides an overview of youth vaping from what the devices look like, to why vaping is a concern with a specific focus on Latino youth.   Additional Resources: What You Need To Know and How to Talk With Your Kids About Vaping brochure In English: https://drugfree.org/download/what-you-need-to-know-how-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-vaping/ En Español: https://drugfree.org/download/guia-de-vapear/  
Published: July 12, 2019
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