Products and Resources Catalog

Center
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Multimedia
COURSE DESCRIPTION The lecture will provide an understanding of the current opioid epidemic and the confluences of factors that paved the way for our current state of unprecedented high rates of overdose deaths. The course will discuss and define harm reduction, and focus on one tool that is currently being employed to reduce overdose among people who use drugs (PWUD). Ultimately, the course will discuss data from studies that demonstrate PWUDs’ ability and implementation of novel life saving methods. LEARNING OBJECTIVES To learn about the phases of opioid epidemic, that resulted in the current state of a highly adulterated drug market. To understand harm reduction as a holistic response to the overdose epidemic. To learn about the history of drug checking, validated technologies, and the evidence that supports acceptability among people who use drugs. Learn about the policy barriers and facilitators of implementing drug checking as a part of a holistic response to the opioid epidemic. PRESENTER Dr. Susan Sherman is a Professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Behavior and Society.  She is a social scientist whose focuses on the documenting and intervening on structural drivers of HIV/STIs and violence among people who use drugs and engage in sex work. She has conducted extensive research in India, Thailand, and Pakistan examining the role of microeconomics and peer influence on reducing HIV risk among people who use drugs and women who sell sex.  She is the Co-Director of the Baltimore HIV Collaboratory as well as the Addiction and Overdose focus area of the Bloomberg American Health Initiative.  She has recently examined the validity, acceptability, and implementation of several fentanyl testing technologies. That study led to a change in the law in Maryland regarding the legality of drug checking and informed programs  throughout the U.S.                  
Published: October 17, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
The October 2019 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: National Addiction Treatment Week | Mental Health: Mental Illness Awareness Week | Prevention: Substance Abuse Prevention Week | ORN: Increasing Treatment Providers | Vaping. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, Region 3 news, and New Resources. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. If you would like to be added to our mailing list to receive the Dialogue, news, and training announcements, sign up here.          
Published: October 11, 2019
Multimedia
Central East Webinar Series: Preventing Drug Overdoses Part 4: Addressing Risk Factors for Overdoses Josh Esrick, MPP & Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip September 10, 2019, 1-2 PM EST  |  View series page  |  View all Central East series COURSE DESCRIPTION This is part four of a four-part webinar series hosted by the Central East PTTC that focuses on preventing drug overdoses. The safest way to prevent a drug overdose from becoming fatal is by preventing the overdose from occurring at all. This webinar will overview upstream prevention strategies intended to address underlying risk factors for overdoses and reach the populations most vulnerable to experiencing them. This includes engaging in standard substance use prevention and understanding the many connections between substance use and overdose prevention. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Review the key risk factors for overdoses Walk through key risk assessment questions for individuals Describe strategies to serve populations most vulnerable to overdoses Discuss potential harm reduction strategies for reducing overdose rates PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing training and technical assistance to numerous organizations at the Federal, state, and local levels. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics.   Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.                       
Published: September 10, 2019
Toolkit
The nonmedical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD) has become an increasing public health concern in the United States, with abuse rates rising rapidly since the late 1990s. Yet preventing and reducing prescription drug misuse represents a major challenge for several reasons. First, we know less about the factors that contribute to NMUPD than about those that contribute to other drug use. Also, because of how prescription drugs are made available, these factors may differ from those that are associated with alcohol misuse and illicit drug use. This tool provides a starting point for understanding those factors that the research literature has identified as being associated with NMUPD and its consequences. Understanding these factors can help us assess, plan for, and select interventions designed to address them. The factors included in this tool have been organized according to the socio-ecological model, a multi-level framework that allows us to consider the different contexts in which risk and protective factors exist.
Published: August 23, 2019
Multimedia
Central East Webinar: Opioid Overdoses and Suicides-Two Overlapping Public Health Crises Bobbi Jo Yarbourgh, PsyD, and Julie Richards, MPH August 8, 2019, 1-2 PM EST COURSE DESCRIPTION Rates of both opioid-related overdoses and suicides are increasing in the U.S. These two adverse outcomes share common risk factors and many opioid-related overdose deaths labeled as accidents may actually be suicides. In this webinar, researchers will describe the context of the opioid crisis, identify links between opioid-related overdoses and suicides, and learn about how integrated screening and follow-up for depression, suicidal behavior, and substance use in primary care can help to identify opportunities for prevention. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Understand the current context of opioid prescribing in the U.S. and the risks of opioid-related harms including abuse, misuse, addiction, and overdose Understand the links between opioid-related overdoses and suicides Review an example of integrated screening/follow-up for depression, suicidality, and substance use in primary care PRESENTERS Bobbi Jo Yarbourgh, PsyD is a clinical psychologist and health services researcher working to improve care and outcomes among individuals with serious mental illnesses and/or substance use disorders. Across both areas, her work has focused on consumer definitions of recovery and preferences for treatment. Dr. Yarborough’s current research on mental illness includes development of a community engagement intervention for individuals experiencing a first psychotic episode; evaluation of the implementation of the national Zero Suicide initiative across several health systems, including Kaiser Permanente Northwest; and integration of opioid-related variables into a previously-developed suicide risk prediction model in order to predict opioid-related suicide attempts and deaths. Her past work has included developing a lifestyle intervention (STRIDE) that helped adults taking antipsychotics to lose weight, improve glucose control, and reduce hospitalizations; and a study examining patterns and rates of preventive service use among patients with and without serious mental illnesses. In addition to her mental illness work, Dr. Yarborough has a thriving program of research on substance use, with a focus on opioid use. This research includes examining the incidence and prevalence of the risks of opioid abuse, misuse, and addiction among patients treated with opioids for chronic pain; an observational study designed to measure the incidence and predictors of opioid overdose and death using patient health records, insurance claims, and death records; a study examining long-term changes in function associated with opioid dose changes; and an examination of different models of treatment for opioid use disorders in primary care settings. Julie Richards, MPH has a particular interest in research designed to improve care for stigmatized conditions. She has applied these interests in a broad range of research projects related to sexually transmitted disease, depression, smoking cessation, and suicide and substance use. Julie is also currently enrolled in the University of Washington Health Services PhD program, concentrating in Health Systems Research, and planning to complete the program in 2019. Julie is currently engaged in research projects on suicide prevention as well as alcohol use, funded by NIMH, NIAAA, and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. She is a co-investigator on a project seeking to understand suicide attempts following patient reports of no ideation (SRG-0-150-13), and she helps manage Dr. Greg Simon’s large pragmatic trial of population-based programs to prevent suicide attempt (UH3 MH092201). She also manages Dr. Katharine Bradley’s recently completed trial of a collaborative care intervention for primary care patients with alcohol use disorders in the VA (R01 AA018702). Julie is also involved in a large-scale project evaluating the implementation of routine annual screening for depression, alcohol, marijuana and drug use across all 25 Kaiser Permanente Washington primary care clinics (funded in part by AHRQ R18 HS023173-01) and data analyses evaluating whether clinical alcohol screening can be used to monitor drinking outcomes in HIV+ patients (R21 AA022866-012015).             
Published: August 8, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
The August 2019 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Naloxone | Mental Health: Children Helping Children | Prevention: Overdose Awareness | ORN | Region 3 Spotlight. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. If you would like to be added to our mailing list to receive the Dialogue, news, and training announcements, sign up here.
Published: August 6, 2019
Multimedia
Central East Webinar Series: Preventing Drug Overdoses Part 3: Training and Collaborating with Professional and Lay-Person First Responders Josh Esrick, MPP & Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip August 1, 2019, 1-2 PM EST  |  View series page  |  View all Central East series COURSE DESCRIPTION This is part three of a four-part webinar series hosted by the Central East PTTC that focuses on preventing drug overdoses. Preventing drug overdoses in a comprehensive manner requires both expanding capacity to reverse in-progress overdoses and implementing strategies to prevent overdoses from occurring in the first place. Preventionists can make significant progress towards both these goals by working with professional and layperson overdose first responders. This webinar overviews the importance of post-overdose services, walks through the options and key considerations for training first responders about naloxone and post-overdose services, and discusses opportunities for prevention to further collaborate with first responders to prevent overdoses. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Overview the importance of post-overdose services for preventing reoccurring overdoses Describe overdose prevention training options for first responders Discuss other opportunities for prevention to collaborate with first responders PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing training and technical assistance to numerous organizations at the Federal, state, and local levels. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics.   Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.                       
Published: August 1, 2019
Print Media
  This double-sided wallet card offers a quick guide to standard drink sizes. It also describes the signs of alcohol poisoning and steps to take to help someone who is at risk of alcohol overdose. Produced by the Great Lakes ATTC and the Great Lakes PTTC Download the PDF for printing double-sided cards, or contact Maureen Fitzgerald to request hard copies: [email protected]  
Published: July 19, 2019
Multimedia
Central East Webinar Series: Preventing Drug Overdoses Part 2: Expanding Access to Overdose Reversal Medications Josh Esrick, MPP June 6, 2019, 1-2 PM EST  |  View series page  |  View all Central East series COURSE DESCRIPTION This is part two of a four-part webinar series hosted by the Central East PTTC that focuses on preventing drug overdoses. Expanding access to naloxone, an opioid overdose antidote, is essential to comprehensive opioid overdose prevention programs. This webinar will review the current status of naloxone access in the Central East region, strategies for expanding access to naloxone, and opportunities to support these strategies. It will also review the facts and common myths about the effects of naloxone. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Understand the importance of naloxone and address myths about naloxone Discuss the changing laws around naloxone access and their current state in the Central East region Walk through strategies for expanding access to naloxone Identify opportunities to implement strategies for expanding access to naloxone PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing training and technical assistance to numerous organizations at the Federal, state, and local level. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics.                 
Published: June 6, 2019
Multimedia
Central East Webinar Series: Preventing Drug Overdoses Part 1: The Importance of Overdose Prevention and Introduction and Overview of Key Considerations Josh Esrick, MPP, and Lauren Pappacena, MSW March 20, 2019, 1-2 PM EST  |  View series page  |  View all Central East series COURSE DESCRIPTION This is part one of a four-part webinar series hosted by the Central East PTTC that focuses on preventing drug overdoses. With rates of drug-involved fatal overdoses rapidly increasing nationwide and in the Central East Region, it is ever more important that preventionists continue and expand overdose prevention efforts. This webinar serves as an introduction to overdose prevention for preventionists new to the topic or interested in learning more about current overdose data and the key considerations for addressing overdoses. This webinar will also introduce topics such as expanding access to overdose reversal medications, training and collaborating with first responders, and addressing risk factors for overdoses, which will be further discussed in future webinars. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Provide the goals of this four-webinar series Explain the importance of evidence for prevention Use SAMHSA’s Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) to walk through the five key steps to evidence-informed strategic planning Share supportive SAMHSA resources PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing training and technical assistance to numerous organizations at the Federal, state, and local level. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Lauren Pappacena, MSW is a Research Associate with Carnevale Associates. Lauren has a background in criminal justice and juvenile justice research specifically as it relates to evidence-based programs and practices spanning criminal justice topics, including corrections, law enforcement, reentry, and courts. Currently, she assists with training evaluations for NADCP and the PTTC, where she brings her experience with quantitative and qualitative analysis and data visualization. With a strong interest in policy analysis, research translation, data collection, and analytic writing, Ms. Pappacena is published in the Journal of Human Rights and Social Work for her analysis of national early-release laws.                   
Published: March 20, 2019
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