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Presentation Slides
Slides from the March 24, 2021 session, "Handouts for Families and Relationships - Part 1", featuring Avis Garcia, PhD, LAT, LPC, NCC, Northern Arapaho.
Published: March 24, 2021
Multimedia
  Using GONA Principles to Implement the SPF in Native and Indigenous Communities   Webinar Date: February 9, 2021   Webinar Description This webinar will provide an overview of a training designed for Tribal communities to strengthen their ability to engage and sustain community stakeholder participation in the implementation of the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) using Gathering of Native Americans (GONA) principles at the tribal/village level. This training was developed to build the capacity of tribal prevention advocates who have little or no experience with the SPF and have voiced their need for more culturally appropriate strategies for SPF implementation. This effort strives to make the connection between GONA and the SPF and to ensure that the content is reflective of the core principle “Culture is Prevention” as evidenced by the focus on how traditional native culture sustainability strategies organically include the 5 steps of the SPF, while adhering to the core teachings of the GONA. The training uses the GONA curriculum as a lens to review the essential elements of the SPF: its benefits, its effectiveness, and especially, its cultural relevance. This webinar will take participants through the training itself, including the four phases of the GONA, while simultaneously introducing the appropriate step of the SPF that aligns with each phase. The last 15 minutes of this webinar will be dedicated to open discussion and Q&A with the presenter about accessing this training in the future.   Presenter Gerry RainingBird is an enrolled member of the Chippewa-Cree Tribe of Rocky Boy. Gerry has been involved with American Indian/Alaska Native education, health, and wellness promotion for nearly 30 years. His professional experience includes community mobilization and capacity building, positive youth development, cultural competency, group facilitation, strategic planning, and program development. He has worked with over 200 native communities across Indian Country and the Pacific Islands. In his most recent roles, he has served as Senior Tribal Prevention Specialist for the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, and Training and Technical Assistance Specialist for the Tribal Youth Program and the 7th Generation National Mentoring Project.      Webinar Recording View Webinar   Webinar Slides Download Slides - Using GONA Principles to Implement the SPF in Native and Indigenous Communities   Other Resources Gathering of Native Americans Fact Sheet The Strategic Prevention Framework Summary
Published: February 23, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
In this Issue:   The Pandemic of the Centuries: ACEs, Trauma and Prevention Additional Resources for Preventing Trauma What's Happening Around the Region? Five Session Webinar Series on Trauma Beginning March 25 Data Collection During the Pandemic, Resources and Recordings Targeting Risks and Vulnerable Populations for Adverse Childhood Experiences  
Published: February 18, 2021
eNewsletter or Blog
In this Issue: Preventing Trauma and Its Consequences Additional Resources What's Happening Around the Region? Upcoming Events Data Collection During the Pandemic, January 26 SAMHSA's Annual Prevention Day, February 1 Epi Corner: Adverse Childhood Experiences: Implications for Prevention
Published: January 28, 2021
Multimedia
Workforce Vicarious Trauma: Management Guidelines Kate Bishop, MSSA January 13, 2021, 1-2 PM EST COURSE DESCRIPTION The novel coronavirus pandemic has brought incredibly challenging working conditions to many in health and human services fields. Many workers are logging on remotely and struggling with simultaneous demands like homeschooling children or caring for a sick family member, while others may be grieving unfathomable losses or managing a personal mental health crisis while trying to carry on for the sake of the vulnerable populations they serve. Studies have diagrammed a predictable cascade of trauma-worker mental health difficulties, starting with burnout, progressing through compassion fatigue, and tumbling into a vicarious trauma condition. Vicarious trauma can leave helpers feeling helpless, struggling with the cumulative weight of the stories they’ve heard and seen. Some may develop trauma responses like hypervigilance, nightmares, clinical anxiety and depression that impact their personal functioning, work performance, and job retention. This webinar will introduce what we know about how vicarious trauma impacts individuals, examine how the current crisis exacerbates these conditions, and offer supportive attitudes, interventions, and policies for managers and supervisors to implement. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Describe the impact of witnessing and assisting trauma survivors on health and human service workers. Examine the effects of COVID-19 and lockdown measures on workers who staff the social safety net. Develop a toolbox of supervisory attitudes, skills, and interventions designed to support front line workers who are dealing with vicarious trauma. Explore best practices, policy guidance, and implementation considerations in becoming a trauma-informed workplace. PRESENTERS Kate Bishop, MSSA, the Education Coordinator at the LGBT Health Resource Center of Chase Brexton, is a seasoned professional development trainer with expertise in working with LGBTQ populations, sexual and reproductive health care, adolescent development, intimate partner violence, and sexual trauma. She is certified as a trainer through GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network) as well as SAGE (Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders). Before joining the Chase Brexton team, she developed the capacity building program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s STAR TRACK Adolescent HIV program, providing cultural responsiveness trainings for agencies that serve sexual minority youth of color. Ms. Bishop holds a Bachelor of Arts in Gender Studies from Hiram College and a Masters in Social Work from Case Western Reserve University.    
Published: January 13, 2021
Multimedia
Listen to the second episode of our Spotlight on Stigma podcast series: The Role of Faith Leaders.  Religious institutions offer support for people seeking help with a substance use or mental health disorder in an environment that respects their culture and values, with some studies finding that religious involvement is a protective factor for mental health and substance use. At the same time, religious beliefs about mental illness and substance misuse can lead to stigma, shame, and isolation if the illnesses are viewed as the result of sinful behavior or lack of faith. Guest presenter: Pastor Greg Delaney, Pastor of FREEDOM Church, an recovery ministry in Xenia, Ohio, serving the needs of those suffering from addictive and compulsive challenges. For more information and resources, visit the Great Lakes PTTC Preventing and Reducing Stigma webpage. 
Published: December 11, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
Upcoming PTTC Training Serving Military Veterans in Substance Misuse Prevention Additional Resources Question to the Field Apps for Veterans and Those Working With Veterans Addressing Trauma  
Published: June 26, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
Upcoming PTTC Training Brain Science Techniques and Tobacco Control Measures: A Merging of the Minds   Five Fascinating Brain Science Resources
Published: June 26, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
Introduction: Prevention Across the Lifespan: Preconceptual, Prenatal and Infancy Additional Resources What's Happening Around the Region? Epi Corner: Prevention Across the Lifespan: Preconceptual, Prenatal and Infancy
Published: June 8, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
The Role of Prevention During and Following a Disaster What's Happening Around the Region? Epi Corner: Data Collection Considerations During Disasters, Pandemics, and Other Crises
Published: June 5, 2020
eNewsletter or Blog
Prevention Across the Lifespan: Infancy and Early Childhood Additional Resources Responding to COVID-19 What's Happening Around the Region? Epi Corner: Reducing Substance Misuse Risk Factors in Early Childhood  
Published: June 5, 2020
Multimedia
Culturally-Informed Motivational Interviewing Skills for Addressing Substance Misuse for African American Males Jessica Young Brown May 27, 2020, 1-2 PM EST   COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will discuss cultural considerations for using motivational interviewing as a clinical tool with African American men who use substances. Special attention will be given to the impact of generational trauma and how they impacts substance use behaviors, engagement in the clinical relationship, and responses to clinical interventions. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Understand how motivational interviewing can be used as a framework for addressing substance use concerns Understand how generational trauma can impact/exacerbate substance use Define how issues of generational trauma/cultural mistrust interrupt stages/processes in this model (ex: impact of nondirective style, the importance of trust in relationships, special considerations for the planning process) Improve skills and strategies for executing culturally competent MI PRESENTER Dr. Jessica Young Brown is a licensed clinical psychologist in Richmond, VA. Her research and clinical work focuses on how African Americans understand their mental health symptoms, especially through the lens of faith beliefs. Dr. Brown specializes in helping clients understand how personal and historical trauma impacts their current functioning.               
Published: May 27, 2020
Multimedia
Presentation Slides Download Presentation Slides Additional Resources Q&A Followup Translations     This webinar offers an overview of Adverse Childhood Experiences and its impact on population health with the emphasis on the prevention of ACEs in the Hispanic and Latinx communities by fostering resilience and building self-healing communities. Participants will understand: 1) What are ACEs and how toxic stress can affect cognitive development, 2) How ACEs relate with physical/mental health and substance use issues, adversity related to immigration; historical trauma and 3) What resilience means, protective factors, and key variables for preventing ACEs and improving relational and community context for promotion of wellbeing in the Hispanic and Latinx communities. About the Presenter Fabricia Prado, LCSW Licensed Clinical Social Worker Fabricia Prado is a licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) in the state of Georgia. She obtained her master's degree in Social Work from Kennesaw State University. Fabricia also holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in Psychology from Pontifical Catholic University of Goiás, PUC-GO, Brazil. She has been working with the Latino community in Georgia since her graduate internship program in 2010. Currently, Fabricia has been working with the National Hispanic & Latino PTTC and ATTC under their cultural and linguistic approach to expand their training resources and webinars to include Brazilian Portuguese and Spanish. Fabricia has obtained certification as an ACE Interface Master Trainer and through the NHL PTTC and is working to increase community awareness of the prevalence of ACEs and its public health impact utilizing evidence-based approaches for building resiliency in the Hispanic and Latino organizations and communities.
Published: March 19, 2020
Multimedia
During this episode, You’ll gain awareness about drug endangered children, the risks they face and understand the many opportunities (often missed) to identify children living in dangerous drug environments. We’ll talk about the benefits of intervention at the earliest possible point to reduce physical and psychological harm to children. Lastly, we share what a multidisciplinary collaborative response looks like and how it incorporates the unique resources within a community and applies them in a manner that provides better care for drug endangered children. Watch the full webinar recording here.
Published: February 11, 2020
Multimedia
You will gain awareness about drug endangered children and the risks they face and understand the many opportunities (often missed) to identify children living in dangerous drug environments. Learn the benefits of intervention at the earliest possible point to reduce physical and psychological harm to children. Learn what a multidisciplinary collaborative response looks like and how it incorporates the unique resources within a community and applies them in a manner that provides better care for drug endangered children.   Objectives: Describe the history and evolution of drug endangered children's response strategies. Recognize why a collaborative, multidisciplinary response is necessary to ensure safety for drug endangered children. Be able to identify children who are drug endangered. Identify the role law enforcement, child welfare, medical and other professionals play in the multidisciplinary response.  
Published: February 10, 2020
Presentation Slides
African Americans have lower rates of retention in substance use disorder treatment than the general population. In this one-hour webinar, Mark Sanders, LCSW, CSC, presents an overview of the factors that prevent African Americans from engaging in treatment, along with strategies that treatment organizations can use to increase engagement.  Presented on February 5, 2020.  Download the Presentation Slides
Published: February 6, 2020
Multimedia
Register and participate in this FREE self-paced course on ACEs and toxic stress:   Course Description: Those working with young children have long known the importance of early experiences and relationships in healthy child development. Newer terms such as toxic stress and ACES are used when describing these not-so-new ideas, and are particularly important when working with families impacted by substance abuse.  During this online training, learners will expand their current knowledge about early development to include up-to-date science that is accessible and useful in daily real-life interactions. Using a case-based approach, participants will apply new knowledge to familiar scenarios to enhance their engagement with high-risk young children and families.   Objectives: After completion of this training, learners will: Distinguish healthy stress and experiences from toxic stress and ACES. Connect early development milestones to safe, supportive relationships. Apply lessons learned to infants and children exposed to parental substance use.   Note:  This New England PTTC self-paced course is hosted on the PTTC Network online learning platform Healtheknowledge.org.  You will need to create a free Healtheknowledge.org account to register and participate in the course.  After you have created your free account you will be able to register and participate in this free, self-paced course.  You will then also be set up to access in participate in all future New England PTTC self-paced courses and webinars.    
Published: May 28, 2019
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