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Multimedia
Click the button below to view this webinar translated in Portuguese     ---This Webinar was in Spanish/Este seminario web fue en Español--- The National Hispanic and Latino Prevention Technology transfer Center (NHLPTTC), presented a webinar on the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C, and Substance Abuse among the Latino Community. This seminar was offered free of charge and in Spanish. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), substance abuse, and the growing number of new cases of Hepatitis C are causing a severe health problem in Latino communities in the United States. During this webinar, we will discuss why this is a problem, the statistics, the advances in the area of ​​medicine to reduce and prevent new cases, the barriers faced by Latinos in trying to access medical and mental health care and the prevention efforts that are taking place.  --------------------------------------------------------- El Centro Hispano Latino de Capacitación y Asistencia Técnica en Prevención (Centro Hispano Latino PTTC), le invita a nuestro seminario web sobre el El virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH), La Hepatitis C y el Abuso de Sustancias en la Comunidad Latina. Este seminario se ofrecerá en forma gratuita y en español. El virus de la inmunodeficiencia humana (VIH), el abuso de sustancias y el número creciente de nuevos casos de Hepatitis C está causando un grave problema de salud en las comunidades Latinas en los Estados Unidos. Durante este seminario web discutiremos porque esto un problema, las estadísticas, los avances en el área de la medicina para reducir y prevenir los casos, las barreras que enfrentan los Latinos al tratar de recibir cuidado médico y de salud mental y los esfuerzos de prevención que se están llevando a cabo. Esperamos contar con su participación. Presenter Clotilde “Coti” Perez-Espinoza Clotilde “Coti” Perez-Espinoza, nació en Lima, Perú y emigro a los Estados Unidos en 1986, se graduó en la Universidad de Alabama en Birmingham con un bachierato en Estudios Internacionales y Español. Mrs. Pérez se especializa en planificar e implementar programas de prevención y educación de HIV en comunidades Latinas y Afroamericanas. Ha trabajado como directora del programa ¡VIDA/LIFE¡ de VHI, Hepatitis C y Abuso de Sustancias en CETPA una organización sin fines de lucro que ofrece educación, tratamiento y prevención de las adicciones a la comunidad Latina. También ha trabajado con Positive Impact, El Departamento de Salud del Condado de Fulton, el Centro Medico de la universidad de Alabama como Interprete Medico, y en este momento trabaja para la organización de prevención de violencia domestica PAV. Mrs. Pérez es parte de la Junta Directiva de Latino LinQ, una organización sin fines de lucro que provee enlaces y referidos a la comunidad Latina en áreas de salud y asistencia legal.
Published: September 5, 2019
Multimedia
COURSE DESCRIPTION Vaping, the healthy alternative to smoking! Or so manufacturer ad campaigns would like you to believe. Though breathing aerosol vapor is somewhat less harmful than the well-known lethal poison of traditional cigarettes, e-cigarettes contain toxic chemicals and nicotine that can lead to addiction and compromised health. LGBTQ youth are especially vulnerable to predatory ad campaigns and peer pressure. While vape makers advertise their candy-flavored chemical dependence with colorful cartoons, blatantly targeting youth as their next consumer market, vaping has serious impacts the developing brain. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Examine the health impacts of e-cigarettes and vaping on adolescents. Increase awareness of the unique vulnerabilities of LGBTQ youth that may make vaping more prevalent and nicotine addiction more concerning. Consider the vaping industry’s claims that using e-cigarettes is effective harm reduction for smokers. Explore best practices to support LGBTQ young people in avoiding or quitting their use of e-cigarettes. PRESENTER Kate Bishop, MSSA, the Education Coordinator at the LGBT Health Resource Center of Chase Brexton, is a seasoned professional development trainer with expertise in working with LGBTQ populations, sexual and reproductive health care, adolescent development, intimate partner violence, and sexual trauma. She is certified as a trainer through GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network) as well as SAGE (Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders). Before joining the Chase Brexton team, she developed the capacity building program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s STAR TRACK Adolescent HIV program, providing cultural responsiveness trainings for agencies that serve sexual minority youth of color. Ms. Bishop holds a Bachelor of Arts in Gender Studies from Hiram College and a Masters in Social Work from Case Western Reserve University.                 
Published: September 4, 2019
Multimedia
The advent of the medical marijuana movement has given way to an avalanche of business opportunities that many states have adopted as a means of increasing tax revenues. Ten states have fully adopted the legalization of marijuana for both medical and recreational use (Alaska, California, Colorado, Illinois, Maine, Massachusetts, Nevada, Oregon, Vermont, Washington). Nineteen other states, and the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico, have legalized medical marijuana. These developments present many challenges for those who educate youth and parents on prevention approaches to drug use. This virtual learning community session will highlight one of the states that has vigorously developed policy and public education efforts that address the need to educate youth and the broader community about the dangers of marijuana use by children and youth: Colorado. It will also present the latest research and epidemiological data that has a bearing on issues faced by Hispanic/Latino communities. The session also includes examples of public health education efforts targeting Hispanic/Latino youth and parents and will delineate successful evidence-based prevention approaches.  Moderator: Ivette A. Torres, MEd., M.S. Former Associate Director for Consumer Affairs at the federal Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Presenters: Ruben Baler, Ph.D. Dr. Ruben Baler received his Ph.D. in Microbiology and Molecular Biology from the University of Miami in 1993. He carried out his postdoctoral training at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development where he specialized in Molecular Chronobiology. He then moved to the National Institute of Mental Health, where he conducted basic research on the molecular basis of circadian gene expression in vertebrates. In October 2004 he joined the Science Policy Branch in the Office of Science Policy and Communications at the National Institute on Drug Abuse as a Health Scientist. His early publications have focused on the temporal regulation of gene expression in the brain’s clock. Since joining NIDA, he has written and lectured about the Neurobiology of Drug Abuse and Addiction. Dr. Baler has gathered critical insight from diverse disciplines, which he combines to advance NIDA’s scientific mission. These include cellular and molecular biology, genetics, immunology, bioinformatics. Henny Lasley, B.B.A. Henny Lasley, is one of the co-founders of Smart Colorado. Founded in 2013, Smart Colorado is the only citizen led non-profit, non-partisan organization focused solely on protecting the public health and safety of Colorado youth as marijuana is commercialized and increasingly available. Smart Colorado provides information to policy makers, parents and adults, educators, youth-serving organizations and the media about the impacts of commercialized marijuana. Henny was appointed to the role of Executive Director in 2016. She has been appointed by the State Marijuana Enforcement Division to serve on the stakeholder group focused on rulemaking for labeling and warning statements of marijuana products. Additionally, Henny serves on the State Health Department’s Advisory Committee for the Healthy Kids Colorado Survey and is an active member of the Denver Partnership for Youth Success coalition. Ray Lozano, PC, CADC Ray Lozano’s varied experience professionally has equipped him to become the unique speaker that he is today. His career started out in the Teen Challenge Ministry Institute, where he saw firsthand the ravages of drug use in young adults. Having not used drugs or alcohol, this was an eye-opening experience to see firsthand the deleterious effects that drugs have on a young person. He saw how drugs stripped away a person’s chance for an extraordinary life. From working with people fighting their way back from addiction, he realized he wanted to work with kids before they got involved in drugs and alcohol, which led him to his work in prevention. As a Vice Principal for a private elementary school, he launched an after-school program with an emphasis on promoting a family-oriented, drug-free philosophy. This gave him an understanding from an educator’s perspective that schools are looking for the best for their students. Ray was the Program Specialist for a very successful youth prevent
Published: September 4, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
The September 2019 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: National Recovery Month | Mental Health: Learning Collaboratives | Prevention: Prescription Opioid and Heroin Awareness | ORN: LGBT+ Long-term Recovery | Recovery Stories Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. If you would like to be added to our mailing list to receive the Dialogue, news, and training announcements, sign up here.       Recovery Stories: Two special guest contributors shared their recovery stories for Recovery Month in the September Dialogue.   Shirley J. Davis For many years, I ran from the realities of my past life and tried extremely hard to hide from the knowledge that I continually lost time and felt like “someone else,” until the winter of my thirtieth year. I went to bed one night and as soon as I turned off the light to go to sleep, I relived a horrible memory of rape. I immediately turned the lights back on and lay shivering in my bed waiting for daylight. It was then that I knew I had to get help. Continue reading Shirley's story.     Kathy Dorman I’m so grateful to be a recovering addict, to still be alive to give others hope, because I remember the life of hopelessness. My passion is to reach children and young adults who may feel hopeless or peer pressured into trying drugs. As a child, I was surrounded by family and friends who were caught in the disease of addiction. I tell people, yes, I may have had a choice, but literally I had no chance, at least that’s how I felt. Continue reading Kathy's story.
Published: September 3, 2019
Multimedia
Dr. David Anderson, Professor Emeritus of Education and Human Development at George Mason University, is our guest for this episode. At Mason, he served as Professor and Director of the Center for the Advancement of Public Health. He acquired over 180 grants and contracts, along with teaching courses on drug and alcohol issues, health communication and community health.  His professional work on drug and alcohol abuse prevention and wellness promotion spans over four decades.  His specialties include strategic planning, program development, needs assessment and evaluation, and health communication. His research, writing, and training emphasize leadership skills, grounded and practical strategies, and healthy environments to maximize organizational, group and individual potential. 
Published: September 2, 2019
Multimedia
To celebrate Recovery Month, Mid-America Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) and Mid-America Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC) have partnered to produce Recovery Story Podcasts to share the inspiring recovery journeys of people in our region. Podcasts can be streamed online or downloaded to your phone or tablet for streaming on your preferred podcast app.
Published: September 2, 2019
Multimedia
COURSE DESCRIPTION Though suicide touches every community, the stunningly disproportionate rate of self-induced deaths among LGBTQ individuals is an ongoing emergency. Family rejection, social stigma and discrimination, economic insecurity, and prejudice-related mental health concerns have enormous impact on suicidal ideation. This webinar will highlight some of the pressures that lead sexual and gender minority people to suicide, what factors elevate or lower self-harm risk, and interventions to help LGBTQ people build resilience in a hostile world. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Examine the suicide epidemic among LGBTQ people, including prevalence, disparities, trends, psychosocial challenges, and help-seeking behaviors. Explore unique risk and protective factors for suicide among LGBTQ people. Increase awareness of culturally-specific prevention and support interventions. Highlight methods to boost LGBTQ resilience to suicide and suicidal ideation. PRESENTER Kate Bishop, MSSA, the Education Coordinator at the LGBT Health Resource Center of Chase Brexton, is a seasoned professional development trainer with expertise in working with LGBTQ populations, sexual and reproductive health care, adolescent development, intimate partner violence, and sexual trauma. She is certified as a trainer through GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network) as well as SAGE (Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders). Before joining the Chase Brexton team, she developed the capacity building program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s STAR TRACK Adolescent HIV program, providing cultural responsiveness trainings for agencies that serve sexual minority youth of color. Ms. Bishop holds a Bachelor of Arts in Gender Studies from Hiram College and a Masters in Social Work from Case Western Reserve University.                 
Published: August 28, 2019
Multimedia
Scope of Prevention 5-Part Webinar Series Part 3 of 5 Preventing Relapse by Providing Comprehensive Oral Health Care with Substance Use Disorder Treatment The University of Utah, School of Dentistry has demonstrated an important role for oral health in managing substance-use disorder patients by identifying dramatic increases in treatment length of stay, their ability to obtain employment, as well as a decrease in their homelessness and drug-use, by providing comprehensive dental care as an integrated part of their substance-use management. This webinar will highlight the School of Dentistry's program and provide discussion of research, findings, and implications.  PDF Slides Presenter: Glen Hanson, PhD, DDS
Published: August 28, 2019
Multimedia
Scope of Prevention 5-Part Webinar Series Part 2 of 5 Selective and Indicated School-Based Prevention Interventions for Students in Secondary School This webinar will discuss prevention efforts for students who are at risk or currently use substances or have mental health issues. Topics will include therapeutic options ranging from group therapy, individual counseling, and are informed by screening and progress monitoring of pertinent data. PDF Slides Presenter: Aaron Fischer, PhD, BCBA-D
Published: August 28, 2019
Presentation Slides
This informational webinar will give an overview of the Ohio Masters Series: Cultural Competence in Behavioral Health. This learning collaborative is designed to help Ohio organizations prepare the behavioral health workforce to serve individuals from diverse backgrounds. The four-month training and learning collaborative will give participants the skills they need to improve service delivery, enhance treatment outcomes, and integrate cultural and linguistic competence into their organizational structures.  
Published: August 26, 2019
Multimedia
  Webinar Date: 8/19/2019 Presenters: Brittany Cooper, PhD and Lucilla Mendoza, MSW, CPP    
Published: August 23, 2019
Multimedia
Scope of Prevention 5-Part Webinar Series Part 1 of 5 Universal Community and School-Based Prevention Interventions This webinar will use the experience of one prevention services provider as a model to discuss universal prevention strategies and the differences between school-based and community-based universal prevention programs. Participants will explore how the Strategic Prevention Framework can be used to identify needs within the community and to select evidence-based interventions, as well as how to engage the community to participate. PDF Slides Presenter: Alexa Wrench, CHES
Published: August 23, 2019
Multimedia
Watch here. This webinar recording is from a regional webinar training delivered by the South-Southwest Prevention Technology Transfer Center and was recorded on June 25, 2019. This webinar focuses on the Continuum of Care to identify the role of prevention in Mental Health First Aid. The substance abuse preventionist can expect to identify how the Mental Health First Aid course interventions address prevention at the primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of service.
Published: August 23, 2019
Multimedia
  Webinar Date: 8/20/2019 Presenter: Hayden D. Center, Jr., Ph.D., LPC    
Published: August 23, 2019
Toolkit
Measuring Cultural Factors Associated with Substance Misuse and Mental Health in American Indian and Alaska Native Populations provides information on measures that prevention practitioners and evaluators can use when evaluating substance misuse prevention programs that include cultural elements. The measures are divided into two main sections: (1) those that can be used for research purposes without further permission from the author; and (2) those that will require you to contact the measure developer for permission to use the questionnaire and to access the complete scale items. Within each section, measures are organized by overarching conceptual themes.
Published: August 23, 2019
Toolkit
As part of a strategic planning process, practitioners need to select prevention strategies or interventions that address those risk and protective factors associated with their prioritized substance-related problem(s). This document summarizes evaluations of prevention strategies and interventions associated with binge or heavy episodic drinking, as identified in the prevention research literature. It also provides recommendations for using the prevention research to inform strategy selection.
Published: August 23, 2019
Toolkit
The nonmedical use of prescription drugs (NMUPD) has become an increasing public health concern in the United States, with abuse rates rising rapidly since the late 1990s. Yet preventing and reducing prescription drug misuse represents a major challenge for several reasons. First, we know less about the factors that contribute to NMUPD than about those that contribute to other drug use. Also, because of how prescription drugs are made available, these factors may differ from those that are associated with alcohol misuse and illicit drug use. This tool provides a starting point for understanding those factors that the research literature has identified as being associated with NMUPD and its consequences. Understanding these factors can help us assess, plan for, and select interventions designed to address them. The factors included in this tool have been organized according to the socio-ecological model, a multi-level framework that allows us to consider the different contexts in which risk and protective factors exist.
Published: August 23, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
June 2019 issue of the Great Lakes PTTC News, our electronic newsletter.
Published: August 21, 2019
Multimedia
COURSE DESCRIPTION As most individuals, both nationally and globally, have access to either a computer or smartphone, technology has evolved into a valuable preventionist tool. This webinar will explore the varied platforms and contexts in which technology can be applied in a preventionist setting. It will explore innovations in tele-health relative to substance use prevention and address common barriers in adopting technology based interventions. Additionally, strategies for utilizing technology in expanding prevention efforts are discussed. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Understand the role of technology through a preventionist lens Discuss current developments in technology relative to substance use prevention and related legislation Identify common barriers to implementing technology based interventions Walkthrough best practices and strategies for expanding the reach of prevention efforts through technology PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing training and technical assistance to numerous organizations at the Federal, state, and local levels. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Lauren Pappacena, MSW is a Research Associate with Carnevale Associates. Lauren has a background in criminal justice and juvenile justice research specifically as it relates to evidence-based programs and practices spanning criminal justice topics, including corrections, law enforcement, reentry, and courts. Currently, she assists with training evaluations for NADCP and the PTTC, where she brings her experience with quantitative and qualitative analysis and data visualization. With a strong interest in policy analysis, research translation, data collection, and analytic writing, Ms. Pappacena is published in the Journal of Human Rights and Social Work for her analysis of national early-release laws.                 
Published: August 15, 2019
Multimedia
In this episode, we are speaking with Joan Masters, the Senior Coordinator of Missouri’s Partners in Prevention, also known as PIP. Joan is responsible for training and technical assistance to PIP’s 21 member campuses and serves as the primary investigator for its grant projects. She provides oversight to projects such as the Missouri Assessment of College Health Behaviors and the Meeting of the Minds Conference. Joan is able to assist campuses with coalition building, implementing evidence-based strategies, building peer education programs and strategic planning. Partner in Prevention Website:  http://pip.missouri.edu/   Twitter:  https://twitter.com/MissouriPIP   Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/missouripip    
Published: August 15, 2019
Multimedia
Central East Webinar: Opioid Overdoses and Suicides-Two Overlapping Public Health Crises Bobbi Jo Yarbourgh, PsyD, and Julie Richards, MPH August 8, 2019, 1-2 PM EST COURSE DESCRIPTION Rates of both opioid-related overdoses and suicides are increasing in the U.S. These two adverse outcomes share common risk factors and many opioid-related overdose deaths labeled as accidents may actually be suicides. In this webinar, researchers will describe the context of the opioid crisis, identify links between opioid-related overdoses and suicides, and learn about how integrated screening and follow-up for depression, suicidal behavior, and substance use in primary care can help to identify opportunities for prevention. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Understand the current context of opioid prescribing in the U.S. and the risks of opioid-related harms including abuse, misuse, addiction, and overdose Understand the links between opioid-related overdoses and suicides Review an example of integrated screening/follow-up for depression, suicidality, and substance use in primary care PRESENTERS Bobbi Jo Yarbourgh, PsyD is a clinical psychologist and health services researcher working to improve care and outcomes among individuals with serious mental illnesses and/or substance use disorders. Across both areas, her work has focused on consumer definitions of recovery and preferences for treatment. Dr. Yarborough’s current research on mental illness includes development of a community engagement intervention for individuals experiencing a first psychotic episode; evaluation of the implementation of the national Zero Suicide initiative across several health systems, including Kaiser Permanente Northwest; and integration of opioid-related variables into a previously-developed suicide risk prediction model in order to predict opioid-related suicide attempts and deaths. Her past work has included developing a lifestyle intervention (STRIDE) that helped adults taking antipsychotics to lose weight, improve glucose control, and reduce hospitalizations; and a study examining patterns and rates of preventive service use among patients with and without serious mental illnesses. In addition to her mental illness work, Dr. Yarborough has a thriving program of research on substance use, with a focus on opioid use. This research includes examining the incidence and prevalence of the risks of opioid abuse, misuse, and addiction among patients treated with opioids for chronic pain; an observational study designed to measure the incidence and predictors of opioid overdose and death using patient health records, insurance claims, and death records; a study examining long-term changes in function associated with opioid dose changes; and an examination of different models of treatment for opioid use disorders in primary care settings. Julie Richards, MPH has a particular interest in research designed to improve care for stigmatized conditions. She has applied these interests in a broad range of research projects related to sexually transmitted disease, depression, smoking cessation, and suicide and substance use. Julie is also currently enrolled in the University of Washington Health Services PhD program, concentrating in Health Systems Research, and planning to complete the program in 2019. Julie is currently engaged in research projects on suicide prevention as well as alcohol use, funded by NIMH, NIAAA, and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. She is a co-investigator on a project seeking to understand suicide attempts following patient reports of no ideation (SRG-0-150-13), and she helps manage Dr. Greg Simon’s large pragmatic trial of population-based programs to prevent suicide attempt (UH3 MH092201). She also manages Dr. Katharine Bradley’s recently completed trial of a collaborative care intervention for primary care patients with alcohol use disorders in the VA (R01 AA018702). Julie is also involved in a large-scale project evaluating the implementation of routine annual screening for depression, alcohol, marijuana and drug use across all 25 Kaiser Permanente Washington primary care clinics (funded in part by AHRQ R18 HS023173-01) and data analyses evaluating whether clinical alcohol screening can be used to monitor drinking outcomes in HIV+ patients (R21 AA022866-012015).             
Published: August 8, 2019
Multimedia
This course is one of the New England PTTC's free self-paced prevention courses that have been posted to the PTTC Network's learning portal.  This is one of the strategies of the New England PTTC to increase and expand access to prevention training for the New England workforce. We know it sometimes can be challenging to access a variety of prevention training due to distance and just finding the time in your schedule to attend trainings. With these on-demand courses, you can register and take the course on your schedule, and get continuing education credits towards your prevention certification! NOTE:  All New England Prevention Technology Transfer Center webinars and online courses are hosted at the PTTC Network Learning Management Center, HealtheKnowledge.  You will need to create an account to register and participate in the webinar.  If you need to create an account, click here and follow the instructions.  Once you have a user account you will be able to register for this, and all future New England PTTC webinars and courses.  Contact us if you have any questions.   Early Childhood Development: Toxic Stress and Adverse Childhood Experiences Presenter:  Alison Schonwald, MD Course Summary:  Those working with young children have long known the importance of early experiences and relationships in healthy child development. Newer terms such as toxic stress and ACES are used when describing these not-so-new ideas, and are particularly important when working with families impacted by substance abuse. During this online training, learners will expand their current knowledge about early development to include up-to-date science that is accessible and useful in daily real-life interactions. Using a case-based approach, participants will apply new knowledge to familiar scenarios to enhance their engagement with high-risk young children and families.   Learning Objectives, at the end of this session participants will be able to:  Distinguish healthy stress and experiences from toxic stress and ACES. Connect early development milestones to safe, supportive relationships. Apply lessons learned to infants and children exposed to parental substance use.   Continuing Education Credits Available: 1.0 Hour Certificate of Completion Available IC & RC Prevention Domains: Domain 6 - Professional Growth & Responsibility   Link to Register and Begin Course: http://healtheknowledge.org/course/view.php?id=440
Published: August 6, 2019
eNewsletter or Blog
The August 2019 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Naloxone | Mental Health: Children Helping Children | Prevention: Overdose Awareness | ORN | Region 3 Spotlight. Additional sections include upcoming training and webinar events, behavioral health observances, new resources, and Region 3 news. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. If you would like to be added to our mailing list to receive the Dialogue, news, and training announcements, sign up here.
Published: August 6, 2019
Multimedia
  Presenter: Margaret Flynn-Khan, MSW A significant amount of discretionary funding has been made available in response to the opioid epidemic impacting the nation’s children, youth and families. The following sections provide information on discretionary grants targeting prevention of opioid and other substance use disorders, organized by funding agency and indicating when the most recent funding competition was and which opportunities that are still accepting applications. To get up to date information on federal funding requests, go to www.grants.gov and sign up for funding notifications from key agencies.   View the Annie E. Casey Foundation's Strategic Financing Toolkit for Tested, Effective Programs    
Published: August 5, 2019
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