Products and Resources Catalog

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eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The May 2024 issue features content celebrating Mental Health Awareness Month, Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Hepatitis C Awareness Month, and National Prevention Week. You will also find links to upcoming trainings focused on the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery, prevention efforts in rural communities, and trauma-informed care for transition-age youth. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: May 10, 2024
Multimedia
Webinar: Honoring Culture in Prevention - Cultural Interactions, Awareness, & Responsiveness Training   The goal of this webinar is to increase prevention professionals' understanding of how cultural humility and cultural standards can improve interactions with a variety of audiences. Participants will explore cultural humility and how to apply it, and the National Enhanced CLAS Standards (Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health and Health Care), in their profession.   Supplemental Resources: Presentation Slides An Implementation Checklist for the National CLAS Standards National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) in Health and Health Care CLAS ACTION PLANNING Worksheet   Learning Objectives: To apply cultural humility and the National Enhanced CLAS Standards (Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services in Health and Health Care). Practice methods to overcome hurdles and avoid misunderstanding in cross-cultural communication, service delivery, and community engagement.   Presenter: Michael Browning, nationally recognized public health and Substance Abuse Disorder program developer, policy analyst, and trainer, has a passion for constituent-led community advocacy. He has provided support to several governmental agencies by providing alcohol, tobacco, and other drug prevention proven practices in capability building, training, and day-to-day technical assistance to assist the departments in planning, grantee support and technical assistance and community engagement. Including and not limited to: US Federal government, State of California, District of Columbia, Atlanta, County of Los Angeles, Kern County, the County of San Bernardino, and other CA counties. He is a proven grant writer and program developer. He was a senior administrative analyst for the University of California, Berkeley - Institute for the Study of Social Change (now: Institute for the Study of Societal Issues, Prevention by Design. He is currently the Interim president of the Insight Center for Community economic Development. Browning was an executive director of a non-profit community coalition and deputy director at another. He has over 35 years of local, state, and national substance use disorder (SUD) prevention and tobacco control and prevention, early intervention and treatment, youth services, community organization, early childhood education, violence prevention, HIV/AIDS, public health, cultural proficiency development, program planning, development and evaluation, public policy advocacy, and strategic planning experience. His former employers include community-based programs in Pasadena, Inglewood, Los Angeles, and Michigan. Browning provided direct support to President Jimmy Carter’s “The Atlanta Project” and the Hilton Foundation’s Project Alert. Browning was a master trainer at CADCA for over 20 years. He is the former president of the Van Nuys Neighborhood Council, member of LAPD’s Van Nuys Division Community Police Advisory Board, health chair of the San Fernando Valley NAACP, and chair of the USC COVID-19 Community Advisory Board. Browning is a graduate of the University of Southern California and was a fellow at Boston University.
Published: October 16, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The April-May 2023 issue honors National Mental Health Awareness Month, National Children's Mental Health Awareness Week, National Asian American and Pacific Islanders Heritage Month, and National Prevention Week by sharing events and resources on these topics. This issue also features an upcoming in-person conference and an exciting, new intensive technical assistance training series sponsored by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.    As always, you will find links to all the upcoming events and trainings for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC in The Great Lakes Current.       
Published: May 4, 2023
Multimedia
Prioritizing Equity in Prevention Series Two Years In: Reflections on Best Practices to Promote Mental Health and Prevent Substance Misuse Among Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander Communities Since COVID-19   May 23, 2022   Learning Session Overview and Objectives Asian Americans (AA) and Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) are the least likely ethnic groups in the US to seek behavioral health services. While AA and NHPI communities represent a large number of diverse ethnic groups, they share some cultural factors that can impact how they seek behavioral health services and how they respond to strategies in promoting mental health and preventing substance misuse. This Learning Session will explore best practices and cultural responsiveness in addressing mental health and substance misuse among AA and NHPI communities.    This Learning Session was created in partnership with the Asian & Pacific Islander Caucus for Public Health* (APIC). APIC represents the unique health issues and needs of the multi-lingual, multi-ethnic Asian and Pacific Islander populations. The Caucus has been instrumental in addressing various health equity and social justice issues affecting Asian and Pacific Islander communities, such as improving access to health care, recognizing Asian Americans as under-represented minorities in health research, advocating for immigration reforms and increasing recognition of complementary and alternative medicine among North American physicians, among several other efforts. *APIC operates under cooperative agreement CDC-RFA-IP21-2106 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this program are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC/HHS   Objectives By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: Identify cultural factors that can act as barriers to seeking behavioral health services Compare strategies that promote mental health and reduce substance misuse among AAs and NHPIs Analyze trends in mental health and substance use among AA and NHPI communities since the onset of COVID-19   Presenter Dr. Marielle A. Reataza, MD, MS serves as the Executive Director of the National Asian Pacific American Families Against Substance Abuse (NAPAFASA), based in Alhambra, California. Dr. Reataza has a broad professional experience as a high school teacher, physician, community advocate, and in health policy and law. Paired with her lived experience as a Filipino-Chinese immigrant, Dr. Reataza strives to amplify the experiences of AA and NHPI communities in advocacy for robust culturally responsive resources, diminished barriers to care, and substance use disorder prevention across AA and NHPI communities       NAPAFASA is a private, non-profit, 501(c)(3) membership organization dedicated to mental health advocacy through research, efforts at public health and policy reform, and community empowerment.         Learning Session Materials Learning Session Recording Learning Session Slide deck   Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this learning session.
Published: June 2, 2022
Multimedia
The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.   Alcohol is STILL a Drug: An Exploratory Webinar Series (April 5, 2022) Recording   DESCRIPTION  Alcohol is STILL a drug.  The opioid crisis, increase in stimulant misuse, and marijuana legalization dominate the news— yet alcohol remains the number one substance causing health, social, legal and financial problems throughout the US.    While this series will focus on the hopefulness of recovery from alcohol use disorder, we’ll also take a deep dive into what we know about the full impact of alcohol overuse and the ways it affects every person in the US.   April 5th Topic: Alcohol Use in Hmong Communities Yengyee Lor will provide information about alcohol use in Hmong communities, and how the intersection of cultural practices and alcohol consumption is experienced within these communities. She will share ways to engage in cultural celebrations and activities while maintaining safe alcohol usage.      TRAINER Yengyee Lor, President–Faithful Consulting Yengyee is a trainer, leadership coach, and organizational consultant helping organizations strategically deliver meaningful organizational impact that is holistic, sustainable, and profitable. She is s a certified PCC coach, certified non-profit consultant, workforce planning strategist, and keynote speaker. Yengyee has degrees in Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Counseling, and Social Work.  
Published: April 5, 2022
Website
        What LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC want Prevention Professionals to Know? The Central East PTTC, Central East ATTC, National American Indian & Alaska Natives PTTC, and the National Hispanic and Latino PTTC joined efforts to proudly present a 4-part virtual learning series titled ‘What LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC want Prevention Professionals to Know?’ In case you missed these events, and you would like to access the sessions, please see below: Understanding the historical information behind the challenges and the risk factors of the LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC (Part 1) Enhancing the protective factors for the LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC (Part 2) Moving the needle: How to improve the current behavioral health system to increase engagement and retention of LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC? (Part 3) How can we transform this information into actionable and practical steps to enhance service delivery to the LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC and make a difference? (Part 4)   During each session, panelists shared their experiences as subject matter experts and/or lived experiences. The sessions were very well received by the participants. Our community asked us to provide additional resources around LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC populations. As a result of this request, our team put together an extensive list of articles, trainings, websites, materials and you can access the information and share it with your family, friends and colleagues. Please click each image to view the corresponding resources. Click Images Below To View Resources                  Disclaimer The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by SAMHSA/HHS, or the U.S. Government, the Central East ATTC and PTTC, The Danya Institute, the National American Indian and Alaska Native PTTC, the National Hispanic and Latino Prevention Technology Transfer Center or National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA). Funding for this learning series was made possible by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). 1H79SP081018 HHS Region 3 Central East PTTC: The Danya Institute, 1H79TI080210 HHS Region 3 Central East ATTC The Danya Institute, 1U79SP023012 National Hispanic and Latino PTTC: The National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA), 5H79SP081032 National American Indian and Alaska Native PTTC. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the by the U.S. Government, The Central East ATTC and PTTC, The Danya Institute, the National American Indian and Alaska Native PTTC, the National Hispanic and Latino Prevention Technology Transfer Center or The National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA).  
Published: April 1, 2022
Multimedia
Addressing Social Determinants of Health Through Prevention Planning Recording   If you missed the first session of the Great Lakes PTTC's health equity training series, Why Health Equity Matters in Prevention by Nicole Augustine, you can watch the recording and download the training materials using the link above. Substance misuse prevention planning crosses many disciplines. We are natural collaborators, especially when engaging in environmental strategies. As we continue to plan and work towards improving the overall wellness of the communities we serve, it is important that we understand the social determinants of health (SDOH) and how our work intersects with them. The SDOH are the conditions in the environments where people are born, live, learn, work, play, worship, and age that affect a wide range of health, functioning, and quality-of-life outcomes and risks. Join me as we examine the SDOH and how prevention professionals can use this framework in developing innovative prevention strategies.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Define social determinants of health (SDOH) Describe how prevention planning can be embedded into the 5 domains of SDOH Identify opportunities for innovative collaboration     PRESENTERS: Nicole M Augustine is the Founder and CEO of RIZE Consultants, LLC, a strategic consulting firm founded in January 2015. Nicole is an entrepreneur, public health professional, and social justice advocate. Her journey in public health began at Cornell University when after graduating she worked for three years as a BASICS counselor for Cornell's campus harm reduction initiative.  From there, Nicole transitioned into the George Washington University School of Public Health before experiencing a rapid career progression from providing prevention education to providing training and technical assistance to communities, professionals, and state agencies. Nicole has served as the Project Coordinator for the Southeast PTTC, the Project Director of the NC Behavioral Health Equity Initiative, and the Prevention Director for the Addiction Professionals of NC. Nicole currently serves as an Advanced Implementation Specialist with the Opioid Response Network. This network is building trust across justice, corrections, and medical systems to address the opioid and stimulants crisis.
Published: January 27, 2022
Multimedia
Providing Culturally Appropriate Healthcare for LGBTQ Persons of Color Randall Leonard, LCSW-C May 13, 2021, 1-3:15 PM EST COURSE DESCRIPTION Due to social determinants of health and economic and other structural disparities, Black and Brown's individuals utilize healthcare and social services at higher rates yet show worse overall outcomes. Likewise, LGBTQ people frequently face poorer health outcomes due to discrimination, lack of access to competent providers, and well-justified medical mistrust. Those who live at the crossroads of these identities are particularly vulnerable to needing healthcare treatment and are far less likely to access it. This seminar will explore the unique demographics of LGBTQ communities of color, the colonial legacy of gender and how it impacts Black and Indigenous residents, barriers to seeking and receiving services, and best practices for bridging gaps in access and care. Join social worker Randall Leonard to explore evidence-based techniques to reach, connect, and serve this large and diverse group of clients in various healthcare settings. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Gain awareness with the demographic, historical, and cultural context as well as strengths, challenges and needs of LGBTQ people of color in health settings Explore evidence-based best practices for engaging and supporting queer and gender- diverse ethnic minority community members “where they are.” Identify three specific tactics to create a welcoming and affirming environment for LGBTQ clients of color. PRESENTERS Maryland native Randall Leonard, LCSW-C (they/them) is a licensed clinical social worker who has specialized in the care of LGBT individuals for four years. They currently serve as a Staff Therapist at the LGBT Health Resource Center of Chase Brexton, providing individual therapy as well as assessments for gender-affirming surgery. They also facilitate “Identity Talk”, a group for trans and gender-diverse people of color to process intersectionality between culture and gender. In addition, they work as a Behavioral Specialist in the Emergency Department of Union Memorial Hospital. Before joining the Chase Brexton team, Randall served survivors of intimate partner violence at Family and Children’s Services, where they provided individual therapy and a weekly support group. They started their social work career working with people with severe and persistent mental illness at Sheppard Pratt Health Systems. Randall holds a Master of Social Work from the University of Maryland School of Social Work with a concentration in clinical behavioral health.  
Published: May 13, 2021
Multimedia
COURSE DESCRIPTION This session focuses on why prevention advocacy matters in communities of color, the difference between education and lobbying, and examples of how to advocate for change. Select the View Resource button above to watch the recording. Below are the supplemental materials for session 3. PowerPoint Advocating for Change Handout SWOT Handout   PRESENTERS Bailey Perkins is an experienced public policy advocate. She currently serves as the State Advocacy and Public Policy Director for Oklahoma Food Banks. Before working there she worked at Arkansas Advocates for Children and Families, the Oklahoma Policy Institute, and for the U.S. House of Representatives leading healthcare, education, nutrition, science, space, and technology policy initiatives for Congresswoman Kendra Horn in Washington, D.C. OKC Friday has ranked Bailey as the 16th most powerful young professionals in the Oklahoma City metro and selected her one of seven “Next Generation Most Powerful Oklahomans.” The Oklahoman featured her in its “21st Century Women” series as a woman making significant contributions and driving change in Oklahoma City.  She holds a bachelor’s degree in political science and history from Oklahoma City University She earned a Master of Public Administration degree from the University of Oklahoma.       Cyndi Munson graduated from the University of Central Oklahoma with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and was awarded the Presidential Gold Medal for Leadership and Public Service. She used a semester of her undergraduate career to study non-profit and voluntary services at Georgetown University and then attended the University of Nebraska – Lincoln, where she earned a Master of Science in Leadership Education.   Cyndi has spent over a decade working in the non-profit community. Passionate about public education and criminal justice reform, she most recently served OK Messages Project, a non-profit working to improve children’s lives through shared reading with their incarcerated parent, as the Development and Community Engagement Coordinator. Prior to joining OK Messages Project, she served in a variety of professional roles in her five years with Girl Scouts of Western Oklahoma. Her insight helped to provide leadership programs for thousands of girls in low-income schools, juvenile detention centers, and public housing.  Elected in September of 2015, Cyndi became the first Asian-American woman elected to the Oklahoma Legislature. In December of 2018, she was elected by her Democratic colleagues as the House Democratic Caucus Chair for the 57th Legislature. She primarily focuses on issues pertaining to children, women, working families, public education, criminal and juvenile justice reform, election and voter reform, and Alzheimer’s.    
Published: October 16, 2020
Multimedia
  COURSE DESCRIPTION This session introduces the purpose of the learning community and drafts a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis of providing high-impact prevention services in communities of color. Below is the PowerPoint for session one. A recording of this session will not be available due to the interactive nature of the delivery. PowerPoint   PRESENTER Albert Gay is a national trainer and consultant in the field of substance use prevention. He has worked with governmental agencies, as well as with Indiana University’s School of Public Health as an Education and Training Specialist and Research Associate with the Prevention Insights.  In this position, he coordinates substance use and HIV prevention strategies and training. Nationally, he has trained the behavioral health workforce, the United States military, and diverse population groups and community coalitions in the Strategic Prevention Framework. Locally, Albert was the coordinator for a Communities That Care coalition; and currently, he is the chair of a county council and a key stakeholder for a city-wide coalition (both of which are Drug-Free Communities Coalitions). Besides prevention, his other areas of interest include youth work, faith-based initiatives, mental health promotion, social justice, cultural competence, historical trauma, organizational development, and strategic planning.   
Published: October 16, 2020
Multimedia
  COURSE DESCRIPTION This session focuses on involving communities of color in data collection decision making. Participants use their SWOT analysis from session one to inform their work during this session. Select the View Resource button above to watch the recording. Below are the supplemental materials for session 2. PowerPoint Tools for Telling a Statistical Story Handout SWOT Handout PRESENTER Steven Magallan holds a Master of Science in Developmental Psychology and an expert in community-based youth development with more than 18 years of experience working directly with the leading experts in prevention science and coalition management.  He specializes in promoting research-based, data-driven, and outcomes-focused behavior change strategies. His experience also includes bi-national work between the United States and Mexico on improving border relations and prevention efforts through community coalitions. Over 1,000 community coalitions have directly benefited from Mr. Magallan’s extensive experience in developing and implementing problem behavior prevention strategies.     
Published: October 16, 2020
Print Media
The prevention coalition has a specialized role in helping a community to achieve health equity. This handout is designed to assist both newly formed and seasoned coalitions to determine the who, what, and how to reduce health disparities as they implement substance misuse prevention programs. This handout can be used as an organizing and/or training resource for coalitions. Also available in Spanish
Published: August 17, 2020
Print Media
La coalición de prevención tiene un rol especializado en que puede ayudar a la comunidad con la equidad de salud. Esta hoja está diseñada para asistir a nuevas coaliciones y coaliciones maduras en determinar el quien, que y como reducir desigualdades de salud a la hora de implementar programas de prevención de sustancias. Esta hoja se puede usar como un recurso para organizar y/o entrenar a coaliciones. También esta disponible en inglés.
Published: August 17, 2020
Print Media
Asian-American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific-Islander Communities: Addressing Stigma and Resource Needs Around COVID-19 and Substance Use Prevention, Treatment, and Recovery  
Published: June 12, 2020
Multimedia
Providing mental health services in the present and future conditions will require a new consideration for cultural elements and linguistic tools via a re-imagined perspective on policy and technology when serving culturally diverse communities. Dr. Michelle Evans will guide us through the use of these tools, the challenges, and the opportunities we now have amid a crisis. PPT_Providing Culturally Relevant Crisis Services (PART 2, Factors To Consider)_M.Evans_04_17_20.pdf Transcript_Providing_Culturally_Relevant_Services_2.pdf
Published: June 1, 2020
Multimedia
Dr. Rhodes offers insight on the effects of social distancing and stigma within Hmong communities during the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Rhodes elaborates on the struggles facing Hmong Americans and provides social and historical context of Hmong culture that should inform providers' treatment methods and crisis response services during this difficult time. PPT_Culturally Relevant Services in Crisis(Part 3)_Rhodes_04_28_20.pdf Transcript_Providing Culturally Relevant Crisis Services Part 3 (Hmong).pdf Hmong Transcript_Providing Culturally Relevant Crisis Services Part 3 (Hmong).pdf
Published: June 1, 2020
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