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Multimedia
Webinar Description The association between chronic exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and poor behavioral health outcomes across the lifespan is well-established, but ACEs are preventable. This webinar will explore the evidence supporting upstream strategies that can prevent ACEs from happening in the first place as well as positive childhood experiences (PCEs) that can mitigate the harms of ACEs. Recent data sources that can be used to monitor ACEs and PCEs at the state-level to guide prevention and evaluation activities will also be explored.   Webinar Objectives By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to: Explain the influence of ACEs and PCEs on risk behaviors using a lifecourse perspective; Describe primary prevention strategies that can prevent ACEs; Describe how PCEs can buffer the impact of ACEs on behavioral health outcomes; Identify state-level data sources that can be used to monitor ACEs and PCEs.   Presenters Amanda Haboush-Deloye earned her Ph.D. in experimental psychology and her Master of Arts in clinical psychology from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Amanda's research background is on mental health in adolescent, adult, and older adult populations. She also has a particular interest in improving research methods to be more culturally competent. As a researcher at NICRP, she has designed and implemented many research projects regarding children's physical health, mental health, and education, as well as children's advocacy initiatives such as Every Child Matters in Nevada and Prevent Child Abuse Nevada. Being a Las Vegas native, Amanda aims to remain in Nevada and work with NICRP to create a healthy community where families and children are a priority.   Kristin Clements-Nolle received her MPH in Behavioral Sciences and Ph.D in Epidemiology, both from the University of California, Berkeley. Kristen is a nationally recognized adolescent health researcher and has published extensively on the impact of ACE exposure on health outcomes across the lifespan. She also investigates social, community, and family factors that can prevent ACE exposure and/or mitigate the impact on behavioral health outcomes. Kristen is currently a Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Public Health and the principal investigator for a five year grant funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that will focus on preventing ACEs and promoting positive childhood experiences in Nevada.   Post Webinar Materials Preventing ACEs and Their Associated Harms Recording Preventing ACEs and Their Associated Harms Slide Deck   Questions Please email Reagan Hart at ([email protected]) for any questions.
Published: May 2, 2024
Podcast
Nathan Wray a Prevention Coordinator for the Roane County Anti-drug Coalition in Tennessee. He’s also a highly sought after motivational speaker whose life story is nothing short of inspirational. Nathan speaks from the perspective of lived experience, in hopes of empowering youth, and his story is a powerful testament to the human spirit's resilience. Nathan’s message combines his passion for change with a sense of humor that connects with the audience to make a lasting impact. In his spare time, he hangs out with his four kids and his beautiful life. Website: https://www.nathanwrayspeaks.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thatnathanwray/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nwrayspeaks/
Published: April 29, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
  There is growing concern among prevention specialists and public health officials regarding older adults and substance use, misuse, and increasing substance use disorders. Substance use in older adults is complicated and is often overlooked, especially when individuals are experiencing other aging related health conditions. While the number of older adults experiencing substance use disorders dramatically increased in the last 20 years, prevention services have not been tailored to the needs of older adults. This webinar will highlight the growing problem, approaches to understanding the older adult population in your community, and available strategies. Additionally, we will hear directly from preventionists who are implementing programming with this population.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Describe how to assess the prevention needs of older adults in your community. Identify strategies to prevent substance misuse and promote the health and well-being of older adults. Understand approaches and barriers to engaging older adults in prevention efforts. Develop new partnerships that can work across sectors to engage older adults.   ACCESS OR DOWNLOAD SUPPORTING MATERIALS: Presentation Recording, April 25, 2024 Presentation Slides, April 25, 2024   PRESENTER: Chuck Klevgaard, CSPS  Chuck Klevgaard is a nationally recognized expert in substance misuse prevention, public health, and school-based health. Drawing on his experience in collective impact and prevention-focused partnerships, he builds the capacity of states, tribes, schools, communities, and cities to use evidence-based substance misuse prevention and intervention strategies. He specializes in behavioral health support; training and technical assistance; and evidence-based alcohol, opioid, and substance misuse programs and policies. Nationwide, he provides trainings to prevent opioid overdose, including working with first responders to administer naloxone. As a consultant to Great Lakes Prevention Technology Transfer Center, Klevgaard provides training and technical assistance to substance misuse prevention entities within the Great Lakes region, which includes Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Ohio. Klevgaard, a Certified Senior Prevention Specialist through the Illinois Certification Board, Inc., holds a BSW from Minnesota State University Moorhead.   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.  
Published: April 23, 2024
Podcast
I am not a photographer by education or formal training. I often describe myself as an “accidental photographer” since most of what I know is self-taught - born out of a pure love of the outdoors and the beauty of creation. My journey into photography began near the end of my career as a federal drug prosecutor where I supervised the Organized Crime/Drug Enforcement Task Force – a group of agents, analysts and prosecutors who investigated and prosecuted high-level drug trafficking organizations. During that time, I was an eyewitness to some of the darkest aspects of society. Although my legal career was exciting and challenging, the investigation of these cases put me in direct contact with all forms of greed, addiction, violence, abuse and neglect of children, and the loss of dignity, health, freedom, and even life itself. Without recognizing it, all of those things weighed on my heart, mind and soul in ways that I couldn’t imagine at the time. It took a mid-life crisis to bring me into the world of serious photography when I realized that decades of exposure to the darkest side of humanity had impacted my ability to recognize many of life’s simple pleasures. Up to that point in my life, my wife and I had experienced blessings that are found in a blur of family activities – ballgames, school, church, Scouts, camping, hiking, birthdays, holidays, and occasional vacations. But as our children left home to attend college and raise families of their own, I found myself working longer hours and enjoying life less. After our last child left for college, I reached a turning point with the realization that I needed a hobby, something that would help me focus my attention on more positive thoughts and experiences. My choice at the time was an inexpensive film camera. Although I initially lacked the skills necessary to successfully capture a beautiful image, the simple act of looking through the lens of a camera allowed me to re-discover everything that is wonderful in life – a world full of amazing people, beautiful landscapes, fascinating creatures, and boundless opportunities and adventures. Through the lens of a camera, I rediscovered a sense of joy that I recognized as a gift from childhood when the world was full of wonder and awe. Now, many years later, I am blessed with opportunities to speak and train at local, state, regional and national conferences on a variety of subjects relating to the law, law enforcement, drug education, building strong communities, protecting and nurturing children, and photography. Because of my law enforcement background, many of my presentations require me to describe the grim realities of bad choices that negatively impact children, families and communities, but these opportunities also allow me to provide positive messages and solutions that can overcome feelings of hopelessness, pain, surrender, and despair. This is especially important in working directly with youth (ranging from those who are severely “at risk” to kids who seem blessed with every opportunity in life). At both ends of this spectrum I find that young people are eager to be “seen” AND heard by adults, and when given the right information and encouragement, they become eager to serve AND to lead. Increasingly, my youth workshops include teaching about photography and the great outdoors. My best days involve a photography/nature workshop followed by an outdoor excursion with a busload of kids. The combination of my professional background and love of photography allows me to share real life experiences that provide a stark contrast between choices that bring misery and pain with choices that can lead to a fulfilling and joyful life. By sharing these images, my purpose is to encourage others to make good choices and live happy and healthy lives. By tapping into the sense of wonder we all experienced as little children, we can all rediscover a world that is infinitely more satisfying than anything offered by a popular culture that often leads people in the wrong direction. One of my favorite photographers, Galen Rowell once said: “You only get one sunrise and one sunset a day, and you only get so many days on the planet. A good photographer does the math and doesn't waste either.” I hope that you enjoy each sunrise and sunset as you journey through a wonderful life. Website:  https://www.montestiles.com/Keynote-Presentations LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/montestiles/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/montestiles/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/monte.stiles  
Published: April 18, 2024
Multimedia
Understanding Addiction: Moving Throughout the Spectrum of Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Interventions Robert Rogers, LADC, CCS, PS-A, LSW April 3, 2024, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION In this session, we will review the Spectrum of Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Interventions with an emphasis on the transition from prevention to treatment. We will examine the signs and symptoms of substance use disorders through a review of the diagnostic criteria. We’ll look at how the brain is impacted by substance use and impairment at different developmental stages. Finally, we will discuss evidence-based Risk and Protective factors related to substance use and shared Risk and Protective factors. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Identify when my work as a prevention provider ends and referral to treatment begins. Recognize the diagnostic criteria, signs, and symptoms for substance use disorders. Identify a minimum of 3 Risk Factors for developing a substance use disorder and 3 Protective Factors for reducing the risk of developing a substance use disorder. Describe how the brain is impacted by substance use and impairment. PRESENTERS Robert Rogers, LADC, CCS, LSW, PS-A, has worked with youth and families throughout Somerset and Kennebec Counties since 1994.  Robert works for Kennebec Behavioral Health as Director of Substance Use Prevention and Grant Services. He worked with Somerset Public Health as the Drug-Free Communities Program Coordinator, completing ten years of coalition work.  Robert is a certified Prime for Life instructor and the State of Maine certified Responsible Beverage Seller trainer for the Bureau of Alcoholic Beverages & Lottery Operations. Robert also coordinates Respect ME, a Certified Domestic Violence Intervention Program for female survivors of domestic violence who used resistive violence with their intimate partners.  Robert was appointed to the state Substance Abuse Service Commission, served by appointment on the state's Maine Opiate Collaborative Prevention and Harm Reduction team, served as Chair for the Maine Prevention Specialists Certification Board, and serves as a Maine representative on the New England Prevention Technology Transfer Center’s Advisory Board.  Additionally, Robert is on the Board of Directors for AdCare of Maine and Sunset Home, a non-profit assisted living facility for older women in Waterville, Maine. Robert is an Adjunct Professor of Substance Use Prevention at the University of Maine at Farmington.  Most recently, Governor Mills appointed Robert to the State of Maine Board of Alcohol & Drug Counselors and serves as the board's Chair. In 2021, Robert was awarded the Neill E. Miner Memorial Prevention Award, and in 2014 was awarded Prevention Provider of the Year by the Maine Alliance to Prevent Substance Abuse.  
Published: April 3, 2024
Multimedia
  Military-connected youth experience unique challenges that impact their educational and social-emotional learning, putting them at greater risk for substance use and behavioral health challenges. Increasing resiliency by cultivating a culturally competent, supportive environment in schools and communities helps mitigate these challenges. Participants will learn how to enhance existing infrastructure to deliver substance misuse prevention programs to military-connected youth.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Understand the risk factors that make military youth more vulnerable to substance use and behavioral health problems compared to non-military-connected youth. Describe how to increase capacity and readiness to serve military-connected youth. Identify evidence-based practices that support and build resiliency within military-connected youth.   ACCESS OR DOWNLOAD SUPPORTING MATERIALS Presentation Recording, April 11, 2024 Presentation Slides, April 11, 2024   PRESENTER:  Sarah Flowers, CPS Sarah Flowers, CPS, grew up in a military family outside the world’s largest naval base in Virginia Beach, Virginia. As a Gold Star Sibling and military family member, she brings unique perspectives gained from her personal experiences to prevention, empowering individuals, and communities to create and promote healthy environments, lifestyles, and behaviors. She works with state, and national agencies and organizations to develop and coordinate evidence-based strategies to increase resilience within military and veteran families. She specializes in training and consultation on capacity building, community engagement and best practices working with military families.   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: April 2, 2024
Multimedia
My guest on this episode is Rikki Barton who has a passion for communicating essential messages to move individuals and communities onward in their goals. She is the Founder/Lead Consultant of Onward Consulting and holds the Missouri Advanced Prevention Specialist certification as well as international IC&RC certification. Rikki has over 14 years of prevention field experience and currently serves as a consultant to assist organizations, coalitions, and state/federal agencies in the areas of substance use prevention, suicide prevention, and mental health promotion. She has extensive experience working with community coalitions, providing training, grant writing, managing funding sources, and leading a team of preventionists. Rikki trains for CADCA in their youth and adult training programs as well as trains for National Council for Mental Wellbeing as an Adult, Youth, and Teen Mental Health First Aid Instructor. She holds a Bachelors degree from Pennsylvania State University and a Masters degree from Liberty University. In her free time, Rikki loves exploring the outdoors on hikes with her rescue dog, Oreo. Rikki recently returned from an epic adventure trip to Nepal, where she completed the Everest Base Camp trek (unfortunately, without Oreo). Email: [email protected] Web site: https://www.onwardconsulting.biz LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/rikki-onward Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/onward_consulting/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/onwardconsultingllc The funder of this project, along with all other products of the Mid-America PTTC is the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Although funded by SAMHSA, the content of this recording does not necessarily reflect the views of SAMHSA. The  National Center of Excellence on social media and Youth Mental Health serves as a centralized, trusted source for evidence-based education and technical assistance to support the mental health of children and adolescents as they navigate social media. https://www.aap.org/en/patient-care/media-and-children/center-of-excellence-on-social-media-and-youth-mental-health/ The internet has dramatically reshaped how we buy and sell everything – including each other. Social media has been used by traffickers to recruit victims, to proliferate their trafficking operations, and to control victims through restricting their social media access, impersonating the victim, or spreading lies and rumors online. A leader in helping us to understand this issue is the Polaris Project, they are a survivor-centered, justice- and equity-driven movement to end human trafficking.  https://polarisproject.org/human-trafficking-and-social-media/   
Published: March 1, 2024
Multimedia
  To prevent substance misuse among our youth, we must enhance protective factors and reduce risk factors. Join this webinar to learn how to build protective factors in the youth in a straight-forward, easy to implement way using the Social Development Strategy.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: Name the elements of the Social Development Strategy Describe how the elements of the Social Development Strategy interact to create protective factors List a minimum of three ways that the Social Development Strategy can be incorporated into daily interactions and prevention strategies with youth   PRESENTATION RESOURCES Printable presentation slides SDS Assessment Tool Printable version of the participant workbook Flipbook version of the participant workbook    
Published: December 5, 2023
Multimedia
Anna Simonson is the proud wife of Kirk and mom to Liam, 13 and Luna, 9 months. As the Project Director of our Region’s state-level Strategic Prevention Framework Partnerships for Success Grant, she works in 10 counties across Southwest and South-Central Missouri to prevent youth substance use through empowerment and protective factors. Anna has been a Missouri Prevention Specialist since 2019, when she began working at Community Partnership of the Ozarks as a prevention specialist. In February 2022, Anna was given the opportunity to oversee the R-PFS grant and has since found her stride as a prevention professional. Anna thrives when she is able to help community-led coalitions leverage resources for effective, equitable, and sustainable community betterment. Contact Anna: [email protected] The funder of this project, along with all other products of the Mid-America PTTC is the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Although funded by SAMHSA, the content of this recording does not necessarily reflect the views of SAMHSA. Talk, They Hear You is a   national youth substance use prevention campaign that help parents and caregivers, educators, and community members get informed, be prepared, and take action to prevent underage drinking and other substance use. To learn more, visit https://www.samhsa.gov/talk-they-hear-you Search Institute has identified 40 positive supports and strengths that young people need to succeed. Half of the assets focus on the relationships and opportunities they need in their families, schools, and communities. The remaining assets focus on the social-emotional strengths, values, and commitments that are nurtured within young people. To learn more, visit searchinstitute.org We’d like to hear from you, please send your comment, topic or guest suggestion to [email protected]
Published: November 29, 2023
Multimedia
Nashville based author and speaker Trish Luna needed the story more than 30 years ago for her then-very young children Nick and Sami as their father struggled with substance use disorder (SUD), a struggle that eventually took his life. Trish knows first-hand that shame, stigma, and chaos that comes from dealing with a loved one’s addiction, which can impact generations to come. Trish has a master’s degree in philosophy and ethics from Vanderbilt University and has a diverse professional background, and “Lambi Talks About Addiction’ A Book About Prevention” continues her life’s work. She remains an in-demand speaker at school’s, court programs, treatment centers, non-profits, and professional conferences. For additional information and resources, please visit www.lambilearns.com or email [email protected] The funder of this project, along with all other products of the Mid-America PTTC is the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Although funded by SAMHSA, the content of this recording does not necessarily reflect the views of SAMHSA. ACEs (Adverse Childhood Experiences) are strongly associated with a wide range of health problems that can persist throughout a person’s lifespan. To learn more about Adverse Childhood Experiences and the Role of Substance Misuse Prevention, download a resource guide from the Strategic Prevention Technical Assistance Center (SPTAC): https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/sptac-ace-role-of-substance-misuse-prevention.pdf
Published: October 29, 2023
Multimedia
As the Director and Chief Research Scientist at The Montana Institute, Dr. Jeff Linkenbach has developed national award-winning programs that change community norms. Jeff holds a Doctor of Education with a focus on community education, a master’s degree in counseling and has over the past 30 years of experience in public health leadership. He is a co-investigator of the HOPE (Healthy Outcomes from Positive Experiences) study at the HOPE Center at Tufts School of Medicine and a past Fellow at the Mansfield Academy for Global Leadership at The University of Montana.   In 1998, Jeff created the National Conference on The Social Norms Approach to Prevention, which has since transformed into the renowned Montana Summer Institute on Positive Community Norms. Jeff also founded the Center for Health & Safety Culture at the Western Transportation Institute and is the developer of the Science of the Positive and Positive Community Norms frameworks, which have been utilized by tribal, federal, state, and local organizations to achieve positive change and transformation around issues such as child maltreatment, substance abuse, suicide and traffic safety.  Jeff is known for translating social norms science into practical applications and has trained others to implement effective norms interventions across North America. For the past sixteen years, he has led Positive Community Norms implementation across the state of Minnesota, which has resulted in significant reductions in teen alcohol and other substance abuse. Jeff was a member of the Center for Disease Control & Prevention’s Knowledge-to-Action (K2A) think tank on Essentials for Childhood and was commissioned by the CDC to write a supplemental paper on Promoting Positive Community Norms. He has served as a consultant and trainer for numerous prestigious organizations such as the U.S. White House (Office of National Drug Control Policy), the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration, The Canadian Agriculture Safety Association, The U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, Harvard University, The American Medical Association, The National Football League, and many others. Email: [email protected] Web site: www.montanainstitute.com  
Published: October 29, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The October 2023 issue honors National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, National Youth Substance Use Prevention Month, Hispanic Heritage Month, World Mental Health Day (October 10), and the newest installment of the NIATx in New Places blog series on the ATTC/NIATx Service Improvement Blog! As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!    
Published: October 5, 2023
Multimedia
Substance Use Prevention Policy Part 2: How Prevention Professionals Can Help Implement Policy Change Josh Esrick, MPP, and Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip September 14, 2023, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will summarize what prevention professionals can do to help develop or change policies that will advance substance use prevention goals, including to address inequities and reduce health disparities. It will identify and discuss the mechanisms by which policy change can occur. As part of this, the webinar will also review the collaborative partners that prevention professionals will need to work with to enact policy change, including elected officials and regulatory agencies. It will discuss the importance of advocacy as a tool for collaborating with these partners and the vital distinctions between advocacy and lobbying. The webinar will also review the restrictions on lobbying that federal grantees and non-profit organizations must follow. The webinar will also discuss other steps prevention professionals can take to support successful policy change, such as working with regulatory or enforcement agencies to ensure policy adherence. Lastly, the webinar will offer a small group peer learning discussion opportunity. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Identify the mechanisms for achieving policy change. Recognize key collaborative partners that can support policy change. Explain the importance of advocacy and the differences from lobbying. Describe other steps prevention professionals can take to facilitate policy change. PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is the Chief of Training and Technical Assistance at Carnevale Associates, LLC. Mr. Esrick has over ten years of experience researching, writing, evaluating, and presenting on substance use prevention and other behavioral health topics. He is an expert in providing training and technical assistance (TTA) in substance use, having overseen the development of hundreds of TTA products for numerous clients, including six of SAMHSA’s ten regional Prevention Technology Transfer Centers (PTTCs), the PTTC Network Coordinating Office, the Central East Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) and Mental Health Technology Transfer Centers (MHTTC), and SAMHSA’s Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT). These trainings and products have covered a wide range of topics, including strategic planning, data collection and analysis, and identifying evidence-based prevention interventions for youth. In addition to TTA, Mr. Esrick has directly provided many of these services to behavioral health agencies and other entities. He has published several academic journal articles. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a Master of Public Policy from George Washington University.     Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.  
Published: September 14, 2023
Multimedia
Substance Use Prevention Policy Part 1: What is Policy and How Can It Help Achieve Prevention Outcomes Josh Esrick, MPP, and Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip September 12, 2023, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will summarize the importance of policy change as a strategy for prevention professionals. It will discuss why and how policy changes can have significant impacts on substance use prevention goals, including addressing inequities, and reducing health disparities. The webinar will describe the different types of policy options that exist and how they align with substance use risk and protective factors, including the social determinants of health. It will also discuss the strengths and challenges that policy change efforts can have compared to other prevention interventions and why they should be part of a comprehensive approach to prevention. As part of this discussion, the webinar will also provide an example of such an approach. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Recognize why policy change can be an important goal in prevention. Describe the types and objectives of substance use prevention policies. Identify the strengths and drawbacks of using policies as a type of prevention intervention. Explain how policy change can be part of a comprehensive approach to prevention. PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is the Chief of Training and Technical Assistance at Carnevale Associates, LLC. Mr. Esrick has over ten years of experience researching, writing, evaluating, and presenting on substance use prevention and other behavioral health topics. He is an expert in providing training and technical assistance (TTA) in substance use, having overseen the development of hundreds of TTA products for numerous clients, including six of SAMHSA’s ten regional Prevention Technology Transfer Centers (PTTCs), the PTTC Network Coordinating Office, the Central East Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) and Mental Health Technology Transfer Centers (MHTTC), and SAMHSA’s Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT). These trainings and products have covered a wide range of topics, including strategic planning, data collection and analysis, and identifying evidence-based prevention interventions for youth. In addition to TTA, Mr. Esrick has directly provided many of these services to behavioral health agencies and other entities. He has published several academic journal articles. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a Master of Public Policy from George Washington University.     Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.  
Published: September 12, 2023
Print Media
Addressing and preventing the spread of substance use disorders (SUDs) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are both vital areas of public health. Many risk factors are shared across SUD and HIV, though each present unique challenges. This product summarizes the scope of HIV in the United States and SAMHAS Region 3. It also discusses how having HIV can increase risk of substance use and how engaging in substance use can increase risk of HIV. It also shares examples of evidence-based prevention programs.
Published: August 21, 2023
Multimedia
The funder of this project, along with all other products of the Mid-America PTTC is the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Although funded by SAMHSA, the content of this recording does not necessarily reflect the views of SAMHSA.  Laura Sacks Morris received he B.A. in Communications with high honors from the University of Maine at Orono. In 2000, she founded the Second Chance Foundation with the mission of helping youth make healthy decisions through ongoing preventive, interactive theatrical school programs on bullying, addictions, suicide, tobacco prevention and other topics.  For over 10 years, she worked as a facilitator and theatrical director with the Council for Drug Free Youth as well as one year as the Project Coordinator for the Drug Free Community grant in mid-Missouri. After re-locating back to Maine 7 years ago, she continues her work in prevention as the Project Director for Be the Influence, a Drug Free Community grant, including building a coalition of community members who have collectively worked to reduce youth substance use in the Windham/Raymond area. She is certified as a national leadership/prevention trainer including TIPS, DEEP and a range of other subjects as well as a motivational speaker and CADCA prevention graduate. Email: [email protected] Web:  www.betheinfluencewrw.org SAMHSA offers free, downloadable publications and tip sheets, as well as mobile apps for youth, teens, and young adults on topics such as substance misuse, common mental health conditions, and coping with disasters and other traumatic events.  https://www.samhsa.gov/prevention-week/voices-of-youth/substance-use-prevention-resources-youth-college-students  Art is not only a protective factor, but it’s a great community builder and gateway to collaboration. Interested in learning more about the use of art in prevention? You can follow “be the influence” on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube or visit their website at betheinfluencewrw.org. Learn more today!
Published: July 5, 2023
Curriculum Package
  These three lesson packages correspond to the three broad content areas where prevention science can inform prevention practice – epidemiology, evidence-based programs, and implementation. Lesson packages each contain learning objectives, suggested readings or resources, an activity that can be modified to best suit your needs, and additional multimedia learning material (e.g., videos). These lessons supplement the slide deck material to enhance learning.  
Published: March 15, 2023
Presentation Slides
This Slide Deck for You can be used as a stand-alone overview of the Social Development Strategy or incorporated into other presentations or materials. The Social Development Strategy (SDS) is a tool for enhancing five factors proven to build protection and organizes these protective factors into a strategy for action that anyone can use in their daily interactions with young people. The SDS is as simple as five fingers on one hand.  SlideDecks4U Spanish Version - The Social Development Strategy: 5 Proven Keys to Raising Healthy, Successful Youth
Published: March 8, 2023
Print Media
While building protection for all our young people is a common and aspirational goal for many from diverse walks of life, schools present a unique opportunity and challenge for doing so. This report describes a set of simple yet powerful practices that, when used consistently by teachers, can enhance middle school student agency and build student success skills. This report summarizes these activities and aligns the evidence-based practices to the components of the Social Development Strategy, a strategy for enhancing daily interactions with young people that have been proven to have far-reaching positive effects on their development.
Published: February 10, 2023
Multimedia
  What is Prevention? January 26, 2023   This recorded presentation, developed with the brand-new prevention professional in mind, will help orient viewers within the field of primary substance misuse prevention. Viewers will gain basic insight into primary prevention concepts such as risk and protective factors, evidence-based interventions, the Strategic Prevention Framework, and the coalition model. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: Define primary prevention Explain the importance of using a data-informed planning process Identify who does prevention work within a community   Presentation Materials Recording for What is Prevention Slide Deck for What is Prevention (PDF)   Audience: Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level substance misuse prevention practitioners and allied health partners located in the Pacific Southwest region, including American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of Marshall Islands, and Republic of Palau.   Presenter:   Britany Wiele, CPS, is a Project Coordinator, Workforce Development at the Center for the Application of Substance Abuse technologies (CASAT) at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). In her role at CASAT, Britany serves as a Training and Technical Assistant Specialist for SAMHSA’s Pacific Southwest Prevention Technology Transfer Center which aims to expand the capacity of the substance misuse prevention workforce. She is a Certified Prevention Specialist with experience working with community coalitions in all areas of the Strategic Prevention Framework. Prior to joining CASAT, she worked for Join Together Northern Nevada providing leadership in developing effective community-wide youth and adult programming, implementing evidence-based programs, and building community partnerships. Britany has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from the University of California, Riverside.   Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.    
Published: January 26, 2023
Multimedia
The Social Determinants of Health and Environmental Strategies (Dec 2022 Series) Part 1: Understanding and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health in Prevention Josh Esrick, MPP, and Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip December 6, 2022, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will introduce and discuss the social determinants of health. It will explain which aspects have been found to be significantly linked to substance use, as well as how the social determinants of health are linked to inequity and health disparities. The webinar will provide recommendations on how prevention professionals can begin thinking about ways to address the social determinants of health and how to pursue a public health approach to prevention. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Understand what the social determinants of health are and how they relate to the socio-ecological model of prevention Identify the social determinants of health linked to increase risk of substance use Consider how racial and ethnic inequities influence substance use risk and services Begin pursuing a public health prevention approach to address the social determinants of health PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing T/TA to numerous organizations. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.  
Published: December 6, 2022
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Heather Harlan brings a wealth of information on a broad range of mental health and wellness topics. Currently, she is working with a County Department of Health. Her experience has also included, adult and adolescent drug and alcohol counseling and has been part of an initiative to support pediatric providers. Heather also serves as a volunteer family group facilitator for NAMI and interestingly in her "spare time" she is a professional storyteller. Heather says her performances are about connecting the audience. Ms. Harlan states, my highest hope is to connect the audience members with each other. The most satisfying level of experience occurs when the audience members can break down walls and interact with each other. Email: [email protected] Web: http://heatherharlan.com
Published: November 18, 2022
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Video Tutorial This short presentation is a companion product to Slide Deck for You, The Social Development Strategy: 5 Proven Keys to Raising Healthy, Successful Youth. Prevention practitioners can use the video tutorial to prepare their own presentation on the Social Development Strategy using the Slide Deck for You. Video Tutorial for Social Development Strategy: 5 Proven Keys to Raising Healthy, Successful Youth Slide Deck for You Resource SDS. 5 keys to Successful Youth. Slide Deck for You. Northwest PTTC_4.pptx
Published: September 28, 2022
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The Collaboration Continuum: Connecting Across Fields to Prevent Suicide and Substance Misuse September 15, 2022   Learning Session Overview and Objectives We all know that collaboration and partnerships are the key to success in prevention efforts, including connections between closely related fields such as suicide and substance misuse prevention. This session will provide an overview of a framework for collaboration, the SPRC Collaboration Continuum, which provides tools and resources for prevention programs to strengthen connections and amplify the impact of their collective efforts. After hearing the story of how a regional coalition has engaged community partners in prevention efforts spanning both suicide and substance misuse prevention fields, participants will have the opportunity to examine their own partnership efforts and identify ways they can strengthen collaboration on the ground. By the end of this learning session, participants will be able to: Describe the SPRC Collaboration Continuum and its four levels of collaboration, as well as how to access related tools to strengthen their own collaboration. List new strategies to overcome common barriers to collaboration in their own prevention efforts. Develop a plan for at least one way they can strengthen their own suicide prevention efforts.   Presenter: Ellyson Stout, MS, State and Community Suicide Prevention Lead at EDC, specializes in public health and suicide prevention with diverse populations. In her role directing EDC’s Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) contract, she leads a team working to build suicide prevention capacity and infrastructure nationwide at the state, community, health system, and national levels. Stout has over 20 years of experience in public health, cross-sector collaboration, and health communications, including 15 years working with youth suicide prevention efforts in school, clinical, state and community settings. She has served on numerous expert panels and committees, including most recently the advisory group for the Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Implement the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention. Elly presents regularly on suicide prevention around the country, and has co-authored articles published in Journal of Primary Prevention and Journal of Rural Mental Health. Elly holds an M.S. in Health Communications from the Tufts University School of Medicine, and a B.S. in International Relations, Law, and Organization from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service.     Learning Session Materials Recording for Collaboration Continuum: Connecting Across Fields to Prevent Suicide and Substance Misuse Slide Deck for Collaboration Continuum: Connecting Across Fields to Prevent Suicide and Substance Misuse (PDF)   SPRC Collaboration Continuum SPRC Partnerships & Collaboration SPRC Virtual Learning Lab Community Toolbox section on Multisector Collaboration SAMHSA resource: In Brief: Substance Use and Suicide     Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: September 23, 2022
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