Products and Resources Catalog

Center
Product Type
Target Audience
Language
Keywords
Date Range
Toolkit
A “syndemic” refers to two or more co-occurring epidemics that have shared causes and compounding negative effects. Addressing syndemics can help advance health equity and reduce the scope and impact of negative health conditions. This product explains what syndemics are, provides examples of syndemics that involve substance use, introduces the syndemic framework to prevention, and provides tips for addressing syndemics.
Published: May 20, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
In this Issue A Focus on Tribal Behavioral Health Providers: The Need to Advocate for the Wellbeing of Generations Epi Corner: Building Resilience in Military Families New! Swimming Upstream with Data: Military Individuals and Families What's Happening Around the Region? Webinar: Charting Paths to Prevention: Mapping Social Vulnerability and Alcohol-Related Deaths Webinar: Principles for Prevention Professionals Across the Spectrum Free Logic Model Technical Assistance We're hiring: Data Training and Technical Assistance Specialist
Published: May 16, 2024
Interactive Resource
  Working in rural communities can be as rewarding as it is challenging. Isolation and a lack of connectedness is an issue in all parts of rural life, prevention work is no exception. Prevention professionals working in small towns, rural communities, and frontier areas often feel isolated from others in the profession and can be misunderstood by funders and program developers. Finding connection and support can be the key to helping move prevention forward in rural communities.   In this webinar we will discuss the unique benefits and barriers of working in rural communities. We will explore ways to make connections and share knowledge with prevention professionals working in similar settings. Our speakers will share their experience with The Rural Network in Washington state. The network brings together rural prevention providers to help share ideas, discuss challenges, and affirm and support each other’s work.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of this course, participants will be able to: Understand challenges facing rural prevention providers, and ways to overcome those challenges. Access to an online Rural Prevention Toolkit, containing 4 categories of tools for success in rural communities. Discuss ways to increase connections and networks.   PRESENTERS:  Isaac Wulff is a lifelong resident of and advocate for rural communities, who came to prevention work by way of leaving a career in construction to teach high school science. After working in an alternative school teaching teenage moms and dads from 14 different small school districts, he became fascinated by the dual nature of growing up in small towns with all their strengths and challenges. First drawn into student support and then prevention coalition work, he ended up working at the Washington State Health Care Authority as a prevention manager helping 10 coalitions and serving as one of the founding members of the Rural Prevention Network. Sarah Meyers is the Coalition Director for the Pomeroy Partners for Healthy Families coalition in Garfield County, Washington -- the least densely populated county in Washington State with a county-wide population of 2,800. Sarah found her niche in prevention after leaving her hometown of Pomeroy and getting a bachelor’s degree in psychology and found herself back in her hometown (very much against her will!). Sarah became the coordinator of a brand-new, state-funded coalition in 2014 and became the director in 2021 after receiving a Drug Free Communities grant. Sarah is also the Testing Chair and board member of the Prevention Specialist Certification Board of Washington and serves on the Steering Committee for the Washington State Rural Network. Sarah has worked in rural prevention for 9 years and is passionate about serving our rural communities in a way that is culturally competent to each community’s needs.   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: May 14, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The May 2024 issue features content celebrating Mental Health Awareness Month, Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, Hepatitis C Awareness Month, and National Prevention Week. You will also find links to upcoming trainings focused on the therapeutic benefits of humor in treatment and recovery, prevention efforts in rural communities, and trauma-informed care for transition-age youth. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: May 10, 2024
Multimedia
"Where do you see yourself in 10 years?" We often ask young people to think about their futures, but the world we're asking them to think about living in is changing quickly. From screen time to social media to emerging substance use trends to being trauma-informed, preventionists have to stay up to date on the health of young people- so have you thought about climate change? Climate change is on the minds of upwards of 80% of young people, making it a standout issue. Increased stressors on communities, families, and individuals can mean increased mental health challenges, as well as other public health concerns, and people and communities will have different abilities to adapt to these changes depending on a host of socioeconomic factors. This training is designed as a conversation to help you begin to be climate-informed about these issues and more, so these subjects are familiar to you when bolstering youth and community resiliency, and helping young people find hopeful answers to the question, "Where do you see yourself in 10 years?"
Published: May 7, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The May 2024 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: From Stigma to Support: SUD and Mental Health Needs in AAPI Populations Mental Health: New Video Examines Coordinated Specialty Care for Early Psychosis Prevention: Empowering Communities: National Prevention Week Opioid Response: Observing and Celebrating Pride Month Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, Region 3 news, and new resources. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.
Published: May 7, 2024
Multimedia
Webinar Description The association between chronic exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and poor behavioral health outcomes across the lifespan is well-established, but ACEs are preventable. This webinar will explore the evidence supporting upstream strategies that can prevent ACEs from happening in the first place as well as positive childhood experiences (PCEs) that can mitigate the harms of ACEs. Recent data sources that can be used to monitor ACEs and PCEs at the state-level to guide prevention and evaluation activities will also be explored.   Webinar Objectives By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to: Explain the influence of ACEs and PCEs on risk behaviors using a lifecourse perspective; Describe primary prevention strategies that can prevent ACEs; Describe how PCEs can buffer the impact of ACEs on behavioral health outcomes; Identify state-level data sources that can be used to monitor ACEs and PCEs.   Presenters Amanda Haboush-Deloye earned her Ph.D. in experimental psychology and her Master of Arts in clinical psychology from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Amanda's research background is on mental health in adolescent, adult, and older adult populations. She also has a particular interest in improving research methods to be more culturally competent. As a researcher at NICRP, she has designed and implemented many research projects regarding children's physical health, mental health, and education, as well as children's advocacy initiatives such as Every Child Matters in Nevada and Prevent Child Abuse Nevada. Being a Las Vegas native, Amanda aims to remain in Nevada and work with NICRP to create a healthy community where families and children are a priority.   Kristin Clements-Nolle received her MPH in Behavioral Sciences and Ph.D in Epidemiology, both from the University of California, Berkeley. Kristen is a nationally recognized adolescent health researcher and has published extensively on the impact of ACE exposure on health outcomes across the lifespan. She also investigates social, community, and family factors that can prevent ACE exposure and/or mitigate the impact on behavioral health outcomes. Kristen is currently a Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Public Health and the principal investigator for a five year grant funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that will focus on preventing ACEs and promoting positive childhood experiences in Nevada.   Post Webinar Materials Preventing ACEs and Their Associated Harms Recording Preventing ACEs and Their Associated Harms Slide Deck   Questions Please email Reagan Hart at ([email protected]) for any questions.
Published: May 2, 2024
Multimedia
The Role of Evidence-Based Prevention Strategies in Helping Address Addiction Robert Rogers, LADC, CCS, PS-A, LSW May 1, 2024, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION In this session, we will review evidence-based strategies for substance use prevention addressing alcohol, cannabis, vaping, and prescription drugs that local coalitions and prevention providers can implement in their communities. We will examine interest groups to collaborate and “work with” as we work on the prevention of substance use and discuss the importance of language in reducing stigma and bias related to substance use and the people impacted by the use of substances. LEARNING OBJECTIVES - Identify a minimum of 2 strategies for substance use prevention. (Substances covered include alcohol, cannabis, vaping, and prescription drugs.) - Identify a minimum of 3 interest groups to collaborate with on evidence-based prevention strategies. - Describe the importance of language in reducing stigma. PRESENTERS Robert Rogers, LADC, CCS, LSW, PS-A, has worked with youth and families throughout Somerset and Kennebec Counties since 1994. Robert works for Kennebec Behavioral Health as Director of Substance Use Prevention and Grant Services. He worked with Somerset Public Health as the Drug-Free Communities Program Coordinator, completing ten years of coalition work. Robert is a certified Prime for Life instructor and the State of Maine certified Responsible Beverage Seller trainer for the Bureau of Alcoholic Beverages & Lottery Operations. Robert also coordinates Respect ME, a Certified Domestic Violence Intervention Program for female survivors of domestic violence who used resistive violence with their intimate partners. Robert was appointed to the state Substance Abuse Service Commission, served by appointment on the state's Maine Opiate Collaborative Prevention and Harm Reduction team, served as Chair for the Maine Prevention Specialists Certification Board, and serves as a Maine representative on the New England Prevention Technology Transfer Center’s Advisory Board. Additionally, Robert is on the Board of Directors for AdCare of Maine and Sunset Home, a non-profit assisted living facility for older women in Waterville, Maine. Robert is an Adjunct Professor of Substance Use Prevention at the University of Maine at Farmington. Most recently, Governor Mills appointed Robert to the State of Maine Board of Alcohol & Drug Counselors and serves as the board's Chair. In 2021, Robert was awarded the Neill E. Miner Memorial Prevention Award, and in 2014 was awarded Prevention Provider of the Year by the Maine Alliance to Prevent Substance Abuse.  
Published: May 1, 2024
Interactive Resource
Our series explores the vital role that language plays in promoting inclusion and cultural humility in the field of prevention. Each segment delves into specific topics and engage in interactive discussions led by experts in the field. Together, we'll deepen our understanding of the diverse communities we serve and how to create more inclusive prevention strategies. Download a copy of our companion resource from this series: https://heyzine.com/flip-book/665943c...
Published: May 1, 2024
Podcast
Nathan Wray a Prevention Coordinator for the Roane County Anti-drug Coalition in Tennessee. He’s also a highly sought after motivational speaker whose life story is nothing short of inspirational. Nathan speaks from the perspective of lived experience, in hopes of empowering youth, and his story is a powerful testament to the human spirit's resilience. Nathan’s message combines his passion for change with a sense of humor that connects with the audience to make a lasting impact. In his spare time, he hangs out with his four kids and his beautiful life. Website: https://www.nathanwrayspeaks.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thatnathanwray/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nwrayspeaks/
Published: April 29, 2024
Multimedia
Cultural Intersections Across the Continuum of Care Southeast TTC’s Collaborative Virtual Summit   Join the Southeast TTC’s Collaborative Virtual Summit! Are you a professional or practitioner in the field of prevention, treatment, recovery, or mental health services within the southeastern United States? If so, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Southeast Technology Transfer Centers (TTCs) invite you to our illuminating event: "Cultural Intersections Across the Continuum of Care." The Technology Transfer Centers (TTC) play a crucial role in developing and fortifying the specialized workforce that provides prevention, treatment and recovery support services for substance use disorder and mental health. The Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (SE ATTC), Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (SE MHTTC), and Prevention Technology Transfer Center (SE PTTC) will lead discussions, share insights, ideas, and best practices within their specialized areas. This regionally relevant summit will focus on the intersection of culture and illuminate the challenges and approaches experienced across the continuum of behavioral health.   Supplemental Resources: Presentation Slides - Cultural Intersections SE TTC Collaboration   Key Themes: Equity Across Borders: Explore how cultural intersections impact prevention, treatment, and recovery efforts in diverse communities across the southeastern United States. Continuum of Care: Examine the continuum of care and the role of equity in prevention, addiction science, and mental health services. Challenges and Opportunities: Engage in thought-provoking discussions on the challenges and opportunities faced in ensuring health equity in substance use prevention and mental health services.   Presenters: CAPT Michael King, PhD, MSW, Regional Director Albert Gay, MS, CPC Lucy Cannon, EdD, LCSW, CCDP-D, MATS Pierluigi Mancini, PhD  
Published: April 24, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
  There is growing concern among prevention specialists and public health officials regarding older adults and substance use, misuse, and increasing substance use disorders. Substance use in older adults is complicated and is often overlooked, especially when individuals are experiencing other aging related health conditions. While the number of older adults experiencing substance use disorders dramatically increased in the last 20 years, prevention services have not been tailored to the needs of older adults. This webinar will highlight the growing problem, approaches to understanding the older adult population in your community, and available strategies. Additionally, we will hear directly from preventionists who are implementing programming with this population.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Describe how to assess the prevention needs of older adults in your community. Identify strategies to prevent substance misuse and promote the health and well-being of older adults. Understand approaches and barriers to engaging older adults in prevention efforts. Develop new partnerships that can work across sectors to engage older adults.   ACCESS OR DOWNLOAD SUPPORTING MATERIALS: Presentation Recording, April 25, 2024 Presentation Slides, April 25, 2024   PRESENTER: Chuck Klevgaard, CSPS  Chuck Klevgaard is a nationally recognized expert in substance misuse prevention, public health, and school-based health. Drawing on his experience in collective impact and prevention-focused partnerships, he builds the capacity of states, tribes, schools, communities, and cities to use evidence-based substance misuse prevention and intervention strategies. He specializes in behavioral health support; training and technical assistance; and evidence-based alcohol, opioid, and substance misuse programs and policies. Nationwide, he provides trainings to prevent opioid overdose, including working with first responders to administer naloxone. As a consultant to Great Lakes Prevention Technology Transfer Center, Klevgaard provides training and technical assistance to substance misuse prevention entities within the Great Lakes region, which includes Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Ohio. Klevgaard, a Certified Senior Prevention Specialist through the Illinois Certification Board, Inc., holds a BSW from Minnesota State University Moorhead.   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.  
Published: April 23, 2024
Multimedia
Prevention Across the Lifespan 3-Part Webinar Series Substance Use Prevention Among Young Adults April 11, 2024   Webinar Series Description In our prevention efforts, we most often focus on children and youth. However, prevention is important across the entire lifespan. In this 3-part series, participants will learn about substance use among young adults, mid-life adults, and older adults. Participants will also learn about preventive strategies that can be used with the adult population.   Webinar Description In this 90-minute webinar, Dr. Kilmer will share research related to substance use with this age group, as well as evidence-based prevention and intervention efforts. The importance of connecting young adults to these efforts (and opportunities for doing so) will be discussed. A one-hour presentation will be followed by a Q&A session.   Webinar Objectives In this webinar, participants will: Learn about substance use during young adulthood and how it affects health and wellbeing during this life period. Learn about strategies that can be used to prevent substance misuse and related harms among college students and other young adults.   Webinar Recording and Slides Substance Use Prevention Among Young Adults - Recording Substance Use Prevention Among Young Adults - Slide Deck (PDF)   Additional Resources Post Webinar Resources   Presenters Jason Kilmer, PhD Dr. Jason Kilmer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington. The focus of Dr. Kilmer's research has primarily been the development, implementation, and evaluation of brief interventions and prevention efforts to reduce alcohol and other drug-related harms among college students and other young adults.   Questions Contact Kathy Gardner ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: April 19, 2024
Podcast
I am not a photographer by education or formal training. I often describe myself as an “accidental photographer” since most of what I know is self-taught - born out of a pure love of the outdoors and the beauty of creation. My journey into photography began near the end of my career as a federal drug prosecutor where I supervised the Organized Crime/Drug Enforcement Task Force – a group of agents, analysts and prosecutors who investigated and prosecuted high-level drug trafficking organizations. During that time, I was an eyewitness to some of the darkest aspects of society. Although my legal career was exciting and challenging, the investigation of these cases put me in direct contact with all forms of greed, addiction, violence, abuse and neglect of children, and the loss of dignity, health, freedom, and even life itself. Without recognizing it, all of those things weighed on my heart, mind and soul in ways that I couldn’t imagine at the time. It took a mid-life crisis to bring me into the world of serious photography when I realized that decades of exposure to the darkest side of humanity had impacted my ability to recognize many of life’s simple pleasures. Up to that point in my life, my wife and I had experienced blessings that are found in a blur of family activities – ballgames, school, church, Scouts, camping, hiking, birthdays, holidays, and occasional vacations. But as our children left home to attend college and raise families of their own, I found myself working longer hours and enjoying life less. After our last child left for college, I reached a turning point with the realization that I needed a hobby, something that would help me focus my attention on more positive thoughts and experiences. My choice at the time was an inexpensive film camera. Although I initially lacked the skills necessary to successfully capture a beautiful image, the simple act of looking through the lens of a camera allowed me to re-discover everything that is wonderful in life – a world full of amazing people, beautiful landscapes, fascinating creatures, and boundless opportunities and adventures. Through the lens of a camera, I rediscovered a sense of joy that I recognized as a gift from childhood when the world was full of wonder and awe. Now, many years later, I am blessed with opportunities to speak and train at local, state, regional and national conferences on a variety of subjects relating to the law, law enforcement, drug education, building strong communities, protecting and nurturing children, and photography. Because of my law enforcement background, many of my presentations require me to describe the grim realities of bad choices that negatively impact children, families and communities, but these opportunities also allow me to provide positive messages and solutions that can overcome feelings of hopelessness, pain, surrender, and despair. This is especially important in working directly with youth (ranging from those who are severely “at risk” to kids who seem blessed with every opportunity in life). At both ends of this spectrum I find that young people are eager to be “seen” AND heard by adults, and when given the right information and encouragement, they become eager to serve AND to lead. Increasingly, my youth workshops include teaching about photography and the great outdoors. My best days involve a photography/nature workshop followed by an outdoor excursion with a busload of kids. The combination of my professional background and love of photography allows me to share real life experiences that provide a stark contrast between choices that bring misery and pain with choices that can lead to a fulfilling and joyful life. By sharing these images, my purpose is to encourage others to make good choices and live happy and healthy lives. By tapping into the sense of wonder we all experienced as little children, we can all rediscover a world that is infinitely more satisfying than anything offered by a popular culture that often leads people in the wrong direction. One of my favorite photographers, Galen Rowell once said: “You only get one sunrise and one sunset a day, and you only get so many days on the planet. A good photographer does the math and doesn't waste either.” I hope that you enjoy each sunrise and sunset as you journey through a wonderful life. Website:  https://www.montestiles.com/Keynote-Presentations LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/montestiles/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/montestiles/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/monte.stiles  
Published: April 18, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
  Dive into the world of generative artificial intelligence (AI) with an engaging 90-minute webinar that demystifies Large Language Models (LLMs) and their practical applications. This webinar will offer a blend of theory and hands-on activities, including article summarization and brainstorming AI-driven intervention strategies for substance misuse prevention scenarios. It promises to enhance your understanding of AI's potential in substance misuse prevention work, while also highlighting the critical issues of misinformation and bias inherent in these technologies.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Experiment with generative AI to discover ideas for daily substance misuse prevention work Explain the basic operation of multiple, publicly accessible generative AI tools Describe types of bias, inequity, and misinformation that can arise through use of LLMs   ACCESS OR DOWNLOAD SUPPORTING MATERIALS Presentation Recording, April 18, 2024 Presentation Slides, April 18, 2024 Activity Handouts: Engaging youth as leaders and partners can improve substance use prevention: a call to action to support youth engagement practice and research A National Strategy for Prevention Substance and Opioid Use Disorders Through Evidence-Based Prevention Programming that Fosters Healthy Outcomes in Our Youth The Role of Law Enforcement Officers/Police in Drug Prevention within Educational Settings - Study Protocol for the Development of a Guiding Document Based on Experts' Opinions   PRESENTER:  Brian Klaas Brian Klaas is the Assistant Director for Technology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Teaching and Learning. He also has a faculty appointment in the School's R3 Center for Innovation in Science Education. As the architect for online learning technology at the School, he leads a team that designs and delivers custom online courseware to thousands of students around the world each year. He teaches graduate level courses on communications design and data visualization for non-expert audiences as well as applications of generative artificial intelligence in public health. Brian heads the university’s IT Accessibility Training and Education subcommittee and the Hopkins Universal Design for Learning initiative at Johns Hopkins. Brian has presented on techniques for successful online learning delivery and UDL programs at conferences throughout the country, including Educause, OLC, TeachX, UBTech, APHA, TechEd, Syllabus, and CUE.   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: April 15, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. The April 2024 issue spotlights content celebrating National Minority Health Month and Alcohol Awareness Month. It also features links to upcoming trainings focused on supporting Black students experiencing racial trauma, harnessing AI for substance misuse prevention, and process improvement. Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia
Building Bridges: Fostering Community-Campus Collaboration for Substance Use Prevention, Harm Reduction, & Recovery   Join the Southeast PTTC for a lively discussion on the power of collaboration between college campuses and their surrounding communities to support substance misuse prevention, harm reduction and recovery. Our panel of regional experts shared insights, best practices, and success stories, empowering participants with the knowledge needed to implement successful initiatives.   Supplemental Resources: Presentation Slides   Learning Objectives: Understand the significance of collaborative approaches between college campuses and surrounding communities to support prevention, harm reduction, and recovery among youth and young adults. Identify key strategies for building collaborative college campus and community partnerships to address substance use among youth and young adults. Learn about prevention, harm reduction, and recovery initiatives being implemented on college campuses from regional experts. Identify strategies and tools available to implement effective substance misuse prevention, harm reduction, and recovery initiatives within college campuses and surrounding communities.   Presented by: Dr. Lori Ann Eldridge is an assistant professor at East Carolina University, North Carolina. She is a public health implementation scientist specializing in substance use. Her research is dedicated to examining the accessibility of prevention, treatment, and harm reduction services for substance use in rural and underserved communities. Currently, she is the Principal Investigator of Pitt County Coalition on Substance Use Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act Opioid and Stimulant Grant funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. With this work she is bridging partnerships between the local community and East Carolina University campus to prevent youth and young adult substance use and related harms. She has worked with students to expand access to naloxone and other harm reduction strategies at East Carolina University and is a co-faculty mentor for the Team Awareness Combatting Overdose at East Carolina University. Kayce Matthews is the Director of the Coalition for Healthy and Safe Campus Communities (CHASCo) in Tennessee. In this role she oversees the collection of higher education institutions and professionals in Tennessee who are working to address issues of campus health and safety. The work of CHASCO includes providing professional development & networking opportunities, providing assessment tools to campuses, and providing resources and funding for evidence-based prevention programing. Kayce joined CHASCo with over 10 years of experience in prevention and advocacy work. Before joining CHASCo, Kayce worked for the TN Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence. In this role, she founded both the TN Campus Prevention Project and the TN Statewide Sexual Assault Prevention Committee. Previous to the TN Coalition, she served as the Associate Director of the Margaret Cuninggim Women’s Center at Vanderbilt University. She holds a Master of Arts in Counseling from Trevecca University, a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Stephens College, and is a Certified Prevention Specialist. Annette Newton-Baldwin is the Assistant Director of the LION UP Recovery Program (Collegiate Recovery Program) and Intervention. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor as well as a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. She serves the Association of Recovery in Higher Education as the Southeast Region Representative. Currently serves as Project Director for the Louisiana Collegiate Recovery Expansion Grant. Reese Hiatt is an undergraduate student at East Carolina University, North Carolina. She is a marketing major and Co-President of Team Awareness Combatting Overdose. She is dedicated to advocating for those experiencing substance use disorder and making a positive difference in the amount of harm reduction resources available to those in need.  
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia
Preventing Underage Alcohol Use Part 2: Strategies and Recommendations for the Field of Prevention Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip, and Olivia Stuart, LMSW April 11, 2024, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will provide information on available evidence-based and culturally responsive prevention strategies for addressing underage alcohol use. It will cover both environmental and behavioral interventions, as well as opportunities to implement or expand policies that can address the social determinants of health. The webinar will review general strategies for underage alcohol use as well as those specifically focused on early adolescents and/or college-age youth. Lastly, it will describe how to ensure cultural responsiveness is incorporated into youth alcohol prevention efforts and programming. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Recognize the importance of providing evidence-based culturally responsive alcohol misuse prevention strategies. Describe evidence-based environmental strategies for preventing underage alcohol use. Describe evidence-based behavioral strategies for preventing underage alcohol use among early adolescents and college-age youth. Explain how to ensure cultural responsiveness in youth alcohol prevention programs. PRESENTERS Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.   Olivia Stuart, MSW supports the training & technical assistance (T/TA) team in the development and delivery of knowledge translation products across multiple projects. In this capacity, she assists with webinars, literature reviews, and infographics on a range of behavioral health topics. Prior to joining Carnevale Associates, Olivia interned with the Urban Institute’s Justice Policy Center where she supported projects to reduce inequities in the criminal justice system. Olivia also served as a Graduate Research Supervisor at George Mason University and worked for several years in LGBTQ+ advocacy and fundraising. She holds a Master of Social Work degree from George Mason University.  
Published: April 11, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The latest edition of our bi-monthly newsletter is available. This month’s edition features a PTTC network event "Climate Change from a Prevention Perspective", Exploring Root Causes of Substance Misuse through Stories, Alcohol Awareness Month and awareness campaigns for April, and regionally and nationally developed events and tools to support and grow the prevention workforce in New England. View the newsletter.
Published: April 11, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
Opioids, Fentanyl, and Xylazine: What are they and what do prevention professionals need to know and do to prevent overdose? March 25, 2024   Webinar Description The opioid misuse epidemic continues to affect youth and families throughout the Pacific Northwest region. As prevention practitioners, it is important to stay up to date on the latest research-based information related to this critical public health problem. The goal of this session is to provide prevention professionals with knowledge about opioids, fentanyl, and xylazine, including what are they and how they are similar and different. We will also focus on debunking common myths about occupational fentanyl exposure, naloxone safety, the use of medications for opioid use disorder in adolescents, and discuss the role prevention professionals can and should play in preventing drug overdose.   Webinar Objectives In this webinar, participants will: Understand what illicitly manufactured fentanyl is and how it compares to other opioids. Describe what Xylazine is and how it is used in illicit substances. Recognize current drug use trends in the Northwest region. Debunk common myths around occupational fentanyl exposure, naloxone safety, and the use of medications for opioid use disorder in adolescents.   Webinar Recording and Slides Opioids, Fentanyl, and Xylazine: What are they and what do prevention professionals need to know and do to prevent overdose? - Recording Opioids, Fentanyl, and Xylazine: What are they and what do prevention professionals need to know and do to prevent overdose? - Slide Deck (PDF)   Additional Resources Webinar Questions and Answers   Presenters Nicole Rodin, PharmD, MBA Nicole Rodin, PharmD, MBA is an Assistant Professor at the Washington State University College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Her research focuses on public health efforts for pharmacy and research to understand preventative and treatment interventions for substance use disorders. Dr. Rodin is currently practicing at the WSU Research clinic where she acts as a clinical lead for patients that are in clinical trials finding novel ways to treat substance use disorders. Kym Ahrens, MD, MPH Kym Ahrens, MD, MPH is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Seattle Children’s Hospital and Research Institute and the University of Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Ahrens’ research focuses on intervention development, design, and testing interventions to promote resilience and reduce risk among adolescent and young adult populations. In addition to her academic roles, Dr. Ahrens is Medical Director of the Washington State Department of Children, Youth, and Families Juvenile Rehabilitation system.   Questions Contact Kathy Gardner ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: April 9, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
Alcohol and Social Injustice: The Untold Story March 26, 2024   Webinar Description This webinar seeks to change the narrative about how we think about alcohol and alcohol policies in our society. We have been systematically lied to about alcohol’s role, both historically and in the present. Alcohol industry marketing creates a “wallpaper” that both covers up the tragedies and obscures the inequities in the consequences of alcohol use in the present day. Beginning with key historical vignettes, the presentation then jumps forward in time to alcohol and the alcohol industry’s impact on health, safety and inequities today, and how we can use evidence-based alcohol policies to address this.   Webinar Objectives In this webinar, participants will: Explore how inequity is infused in the history of alcohol policy, both globally and in the USA. Describe inequities in alcohol-related harms. Explore alcohol’s role in various types of violence. Describe how alcohol companies perpetuate and support inequities and social injustice, at national and local levels. Examine evidence-based alcohol policies that alleviate inequity and address social justice issues.   Webinar Recording and Slides Alcohol and Social Injustice: The Untold Story - Recording Alcohol and Social Injustice: The Untold Story - Slide Deck (PDF)   Presenters David Jernigan, PhD David Jernigan, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Health Law, Policy and Management and Assistant Dean for Practice at the Boston University School of Public Health. He has written and worked on alcohol policy for more than 35 years, at local, state, national and global levels. He has written more than 150 peer-reviewed journal articles and contributed chapters to seven books on alcohol issues, as well as two chapters on cannabis policy. He has also authored or co-authored pioneering works on alcohol, young people and health worldwide and in less-resourced countries, and on cannabis policy and public health.   Questions Contact Kathy Gardner ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: April 9, 2024
Multimedia
Preventing Underage Alcohol Use Part 1: Identifying and Understanding the Data Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip, and Olivia Stuart, LMSW April 9, 2024, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will provide a broad overview of the current state of underage drinking and related prevention efforts. It will begin by reviewing the most common data sources for underage alcohol consumption and discuss opportunities to improve and expand data collection efforts. The webinar will then summarize the most recent data on alcohol use prevalence and patterns, as well as the consequences of use, at the national level and for the Central East region (HHS region 3). It will also describe the research on risk and protective factors for alcohol use among young people. Lastly, it will provide information on how the social determinants of health play a role in underage alcohol use rates. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Describe underage alcohol data sources and opportunities to expand data collection. Explain the scope of underage alcohol use and consequences in the Central East region and nationally. Identify risk and protective factors relevant to underage alcohol use. Recognize the effect of the social determinants of health on underage alcohol use. PRESENTERS Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.   Olivia Stuart, MSW supports the training & technical assistance (T/TA) team in the development and delivery of knowledge translation products across multiple projects. In this capacity, she assists with webinars, literature reviews, and infographics on a range of behavioral health topics. Prior to joining Carnevale Associates, Olivia interned with the Urban Institute’s Justice Policy Center where she supported projects to reduce inequities in the criminal justice system. Olivia also served as a Graduate Research Supervisor at George Mason University and worked for several years in LGBTQ+ advocacy and fundraising. She holds a Master of Social Work degree from George Mason University.  
Published: April 9, 2024
Podcast
Rodney Wambeam, Ph.D. is a Senior Research Scientist at the Wyoming Survey & Analysis Center (WYSAC) of the University of Wyoming (UW). He is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Political Science at UW. Dr. Wambeam completed his Ph.D. at the University of Nebraska in 1999 and served as policy advisor to Nebraska Governor Ben Nelson. He was Director of the Evaluation Research Department at the Nebraska Council to Prevent Alcohol and Drug Abuse before moving home to Wyoming in 2002. At WYSAC, Dr. Wambeam and his team conduct numerous substance abuse prevention and treatment research projects in many states including Arkansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, and Wyoming. He currently leads the Federal Prevention Block Grant, State Opioid Response Grant, and National Opioid Litigation evaluations in Arkansas, as well as leading the Opioid/Fentanyl Needs Assessment and Strategic Plan in Wyoming. He has presented more than 50 keynotes across the country on substance abuse prevention with millennials and on the history of alcohol in America. His book “The Community Needs Assessment Workbook” from Oxford University Press came out in 2015. Email: [email protected] Website: https://wysac.uwyo.edu/wysac/people/rwambeam/ Book: The Community Needs Assessment Workbook
Published: April 4, 2024
Multimedia
Understanding Addiction: Moving Throughout the Spectrum of Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Interventions Robert Rogers, LADC, CCS, PS-A, LSW April 3, 2024, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION In this session, we will review the Spectrum of Mental, Emotional, and Behavioral Interventions with an emphasis on the transition from prevention to treatment. We will examine the signs and symptoms of substance use disorders through a review of the diagnostic criteria. We’ll look at how the brain is impacted by substance use and impairment at different developmental stages. Finally, we will discuss evidence-based Risk and Protective factors related to substance use and shared Risk and Protective factors. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Identify when my work as a prevention provider ends and referral to treatment begins. Recognize the diagnostic criteria, signs, and symptoms for substance use disorders. Identify a minimum of 3 Risk Factors for developing a substance use disorder and 3 Protective Factors for reducing the risk of developing a substance use disorder. Describe how the brain is impacted by substance use and impairment. PRESENTERS Robert Rogers, LADC, CCS, LSW, PS-A, has worked with youth and families throughout Somerset and Kennebec Counties since 1994.  Robert works for Kennebec Behavioral Health as Director of Substance Use Prevention and Grant Services. He worked with Somerset Public Health as the Drug-Free Communities Program Coordinator, completing ten years of coalition work.  Robert is a certified Prime for Life instructor and the State of Maine certified Responsible Beverage Seller trainer for the Bureau of Alcoholic Beverages & Lottery Operations. Robert also coordinates Respect ME, a Certified Domestic Violence Intervention Program for female survivors of domestic violence who used resistive violence with their intimate partners.  Robert was appointed to the state Substance Abuse Service Commission, served by appointment on the state's Maine Opiate Collaborative Prevention and Harm Reduction team, served as Chair for the Maine Prevention Specialists Certification Board, and serves as a Maine representative on the New England Prevention Technology Transfer Center’s Advisory Board.  Additionally, Robert is on the Board of Directors for AdCare of Maine and Sunset Home, a non-profit assisted living facility for older women in Waterville, Maine. Robert is an Adjunct Professor of Substance Use Prevention at the University of Maine at Farmington.  Most recently, Governor Mills appointed Robert to the State of Maine Board of Alcohol & Drug Counselors and serves as the board's Chair. In 2021, Robert was awarded the Neill E. Miner Memorial Prevention Award, and in 2014 was awarded Prevention Provider of the Year by the Maine Alliance to Prevent Substance Abuse.  
Published: April 3, 2024
1 2 3 61
Copyright © 2024 Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC) Network
envelopephone-handsetmap-markermagnifiercrossmenuchevron-down