Products and Resources Catalog

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Multimedia
What Does NOT Work in Prevention August 8, 2022   Webinar Overview and Objectives Many trainings and resources focus on what research has shown to be effective to prevent substance misuse. We also know through research what is NOT effective in preventing substance misuse and in some cases is harmful. Yet communities across the nation continue to implement these ineffective and sometimes counterproductive strategies. The focus of this webinar will be on identifying these ineffective approaches. We will also spend time discussing strategies prevention professionals can use to address the resistance often expressed by individuals and organizations reluctant to change long-standing, well-liked prevention practices. By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to: Identify at least five interventions that have been shown through research to NOT be effective in preventing substance misuse List evidence-based approaches that can be used as effective alternatives to the ineffective/counterproductive strategies Describe strategies to address resistance to discontinuing ineffective and/or counterproductive prevention strategies   Presenters   Pam Tindall, CPP, has dedicated her career to the field of substance abuse prevention, consulting in all 50 U.S. states and across urban, rural, frontier, Alaska Native, American Indian, and Pacific Island communities. Her range of work has included community substance abuse prevention program development, strategic planning, evaluation, prevention workforce development, K-12 prevention education and student assistance, school drop-out prevention, and inpatient and outpatient drug treatment. She is a certified prevention professional.               Rick Collins, MS, CPS, is a Cincinnati, Ohio native who has resided in Hawai‘i since 2003. He specializes in community organizing and public health policy advocacy on alcohol and drug use prevention. In 2012, Rick helped organize concerned residents establish a new community coalition to address youth substance use problems occurring on Maui, and served as its coordinator for the first four years. He is the co-founder of the Hawai‘i Alcohol Policy Alliance, a statewide coalition whose mission is to advocate for public health-focused alcohol policies, and he currently serves as Coalition Director for three community coalitions across Hawai‘i. His experience includes establishing new coalitions, planning and implementing prevention programs and community-level strategies, grassroots organizing, and mobilizing a statewide effort to advocate for state-level alcohol and drug prevention policies. He works as a consultant for Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America, providing training and technical assistance to community coalitions and prevention professionals locally and across the country. He is a Certified Prevention Specialist and holds an MS in Counseling Psychology from Chaminade University and a BA in Religious Studies from the University of Dayton.       Webinar Materials Recording for What Does NOT Work in Prevention What Does NOT Work in Prevention Participant Workbook (PDF) Slide Deck for What Does NOT Work in Prevention (PDF) Evidence-Based Programs, Policies, and Practices Toolkit   Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: August 23, 2022
Multimedia
The Ripple Effect July 6, 2022   Webinar Overview and Objectives Identifying the impacts of complex community work is often challenging due to the time lag between the work and the ultimate effect on clients. But what if you could create a map? This webinar will introduce participants to the Ripple Effects Mapping process. It starts with appreciative inquiry interviews in small group settings, before leading a mapping process that involves storytelling in an online group setting. As participants share their experiences with the facilitator, their stories about accomplishments, partnerships, and contributions are virtually mapped on the screen. At the conclusion, participants will have a digital map that contains the learning, actions, and condition changes that happened as a result of a program, workshop series, or event. This webinar will: Introduce members to the benefits of using Ripple Effects Mapping to identify the intended and unintended outcomes. Demonstrate how it captures the impacts of complex or evolving work. Show how it is useful when outcomes are difficult to conceptualize and measure with other methods.    Presenters Debra Hansen, M.Ed., is a professor and county Extension Director with Washington State University, focusing on community and economic development in rural Stevens County. Debra was one of the original architects of Ripple Effects Mapping, developed in 2008 to discover poverty reduction outcomes in individual communities that participated in the Washington’s Horizons Program. She continues to map programs and train others to use this engaging tool. Hansen has a master’s degree in Adult Education from Penn State.             Rebecca Sero, Ph.D., is a Senior Research Methodologist at GAO, where she works with engagement teams to help select and implement methodologies that will effectively evaluate and analyze data in order to answer proposed research questions. Rebecca also helps conduct and train on “in-depth” Ripple Effects Mapping and is most often engaged with determining how to best analyze the rich data that is produced from REM evaluations. She received a Ph.D. in Human Development from Purdue University and a M.S. in Family Studies from Miami University.              Webinar Materials Webinar Recording Webinar Slide-deck   Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: July 18, 2022
Multimedia
Prioritizing Equity in Prevention Series Two Years In: Reflections on Best Practices to Promote Mental Health and Prevent Substance Misuse Among Asian American, Native Hawaiian, and Pacific Islander Communities Since COVID-19   May 23, 2022   Learning Session Overview and Objectives Asian Americans (AA) and Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) are the least likely ethnic groups in the US to seek behavioral health services. While AA and NHPI communities represent a large number of diverse ethnic groups, they share some cultural factors that can impact how they seek behavioral health services and how they respond to strategies in promoting mental health and preventing substance misuse. This Learning Session will explore best practices and cultural responsiveness in addressing mental health and substance misuse among AA and NHPI communities.    This Learning Session was created in partnership with the Asian & Pacific Islander Caucus for Public Health* (APIC). APIC represents the unique health issues and needs of the multi-lingual, multi-ethnic Asian and Pacific Islander populations. The Caucus has been instrumental in addressing various health equity and social justice issues affecting Asian and Pacific Islander communities, such as improving access to health care, recognizing Asian Americans as under-represented minorities in health research, advocating for immigration reforms and increasing recognition of complementary and alternative medicine among North American physicians, among several other efforts. *APIC operates under cooperative agreement CDC-RFA-IP21-2106 from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this program are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC/HHS   Objectives By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: Identify cultural factors that can act as barriers to seeking behavioral health services Compare strategies that promote mental health and reduce substance misuse among AAs and NHPIs Analyze trends in mental health and substance use among AA and NHPI communities since the onset of COVID-19   Presenter Dr. Marielle A. Reataza, MD, MS serves as the Executive Director of the National Asian Pacific American Families Against Substance Abuse (NAPAFASA), based in Alhambra, California. Dr. Reataza has a broad professional experience as a high school teacher, physician, community advocate, and in health policy and law. Paired with her lived experience as a Filipino-Chinese immigrant, Dr. Reataza strives to amplify the experiences of AA and NHPI communities in advocacy for robust culturally responsive resources, diminished barriers to care, and substance use disorder prevention across AA and NHPI communities       NAPAFASA is a private, non-profit, 501(c)(3) membership organization dedicated to mental health advocacy through research, efforts at public health and policy reform, and community empowerment.         Learning Session Materials Learning Session Recording Learning Session Slide deck   Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this learning session.
Published: June 2, 2022
Multimedia
Learning Session Overview and Objectives This Learning Session will address the risk and protective factors of substance misuse and health inequities among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning (LGBTQ+) youth and communities. Through research and evidence-based practices, participants will receive information on why this population is at greater risk of substance misuse, has difficulty gaining access to services, and health inequities. Presenters will share strategies and best practices to identify specific needs of LGBTQ+ youth and the LGBTQ+ community to effectively help prevent substance misuse and provide strategies to support LGBTQ youth in your community. This Learning Session will be formatted as a 45-minute presentation followed by a 45-minute facilitator-led discussion. By the end of this event, participants will be able to: Name at least two (2) factors that put LGBTQ+ youth population at greater risk of health inequities. Identify at least three (3) indicators that lead LGBTQ+ youth to misuse substances. Strategically plan how to work with LGBTQ+ youth in a way that is supportive and affirming to their specific needs.   Presenters Kevin McCloskey Mike Freeman   Post-Learning Session Materials Affirming LGBTQ+ Youth and Community Recording Affirming LGBTQ+ Youth and Community Slide Deck
Published: May 10, 2022
Multimedia
Women and Weed   April 14, 2022   Description The Pacific Southwest Addiction and Prevention Technology Transfer Centers are pleased to present a 60-minute webinar entitled Women and Weed. This webinar will outline the rapidly changing culture of cannabis use highlighting potency and routes of administration, perception of risk, and common exchanges regarding substance use and women’s issues. It will share popular products marketed to women and campaigns targeted to individuals who identify as female. It will review public health concerns including child protective services, health concerns of use during pregnancy and breastfeeding, as well as the influence on self and family and how to have an intelligent “cannabis conversation.”   Objectives By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: Identify at least three (3) new trends in use, potency, products and marketing practices that make women vulnerable to use. Specify at least two (2) components of the relationship between cannabis and women’s health. Recall at least two (2) ways that the legalization of recreational cannabis has influenced public health, perception of use, and consumption specifically targeting women. Explain at least two (2) current research findings pertaining to addiction, intelligence/academic success, and parenting, and specify two (2) effective ways to communicate use deterrence.   Presenter Dr. Latisha Bader has worked in the field of mental health and addiction for more than 18 years. She graduated from the University of North Texas in 2007 with a PhD in counseling psychology and specialization in sport psychology, and completed her postdoctoral fellowship in Chemical Dependency at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. She is a Licensed Psychologist and Licensed Addiction Counselor, in addition she is also a Certified Mental Performance Consultant working with elite athletes and teams. Dr. Bader has worked in a variety of treatment settings including residential, outpatient, private practice, and Native American health care. She spends time in the sport environment in collegiate athletic departments, working with professional teams, and Olympic athletes. She currently compliments the multi-disciplinary team at Women’s Recovery by serving as the Chief Clinical Officer, advancing treatment for women. In addition, she maintains a private practice offering counseling, consultation, educational presentations, and sport psychology services. She authored a chapter in the evidenced based book, Cannabis in Medicine. She serves on the Speakers Bureau for the National Marijuana Initiative as a subject matter expert on emerging research, addiction and treatment.   Webinar Recording  Webinar Recording   Additional Resources If you're looking for more information on how substance misuse impacts the brain check out this self-paced online course on  HealtheKnowledge.org Substance Use and the Developing Brain   Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: April 22, 2022
Multimedia
Toward Equity-Focused Prevention of Substance Misuse for Hispanic and Latin Populations: Old Trends and New Directions   March 17, 2022   Webinar Recording and Slides Webinar Slide-Deck Webinar Recording   Additional Resources Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2013), Attaining Health Equity   National Latino Behavioral Health Association Juntos Network- To receive a welcome email highlighting their products including the E-compendium and Guide developed by the National Hispanic and Latino PTTC   Webinar Overview and Objectives  This webinar and discussion will begin with an overview of epidemiological and hypothesis driven research on substance misuse disparities among Hispanic and Latina/o adults in the United States. From there, we will focus on how to promote health equity in primary prevention settings through two methods. First, we will discuss the importance of intra-ethnic trends in substance misuse, social determinants of health, and cultural background, and the need to move beyond the umbrella terms of "Hispanic" and "Latina/o" in both research and practice. Second, we will explore how existing primary prevention programs can be tailored to reach Hispanic/Latin communities through surface-structure and deep structure cultural adaptations using worked examples from the field. This event will be formatted as a 45-minute presentation, followed by a 45-minute session of questions, answers and guided discussion.  By the end of this presentation and discussion, participants will be able to: Describe trends in substance misuse for Hispanic/Latin Americans Recognize the importance of identifying intra-ethnic differences in the Hispanic/Latin population Discuss surface-structure and deep-structure cultural adaptations used in substance use prevention programs   Presenter Dr. Tim Grigsby is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Social and Behavioral Health in the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) School of Public Health. He completed his PhD in Preventive Medicine (Health Behavior Research) from the University of Southern California in 2016. His primary research interests are on the conceptualization, measurement, screening, and prevention of substance misuse; the health effects of childhood trauma exposure; and identifying sources of health disparities in Hispanic/Latina/o communities. His secondary interests are in the dissemination of novel research and analytic methods in public health research. His current work explores the role of family and community-based trauma exposure as risk factors for substance use, misuse, and related health outcomes in minority populations. Specifically, his work has identified adverse childhood experiences and perceived discrimination as important risk-factors of substance use, violence, and adverse health outcomes in ethnic and sexual minority populations.      Questions Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: April 7, 2022
Multimedia
One Choice Prevention: A Message of Hope and Science   February 15, 2022   Webinar Recording and Slides Webinar Slide-Deck Webinar Recording   Additional Resources One Choice Prevention Toolkit One Choice Prevention Webinar Q&A Responses   Description This webinar presents the One Choice Toolkit, a free resource for prevention leaders working with youth of all ages. One Choice is not a program but a framework. Analogous to other standards that promote teen health, the standard for substance use is One Choice: no use of any alcohol, nicotine, marijuana, or other drugs by youth under age 21 for reasons of health. Data show that for American youth, all substance use is closely related – and that the percentage of young people making the decision not to use any substances has been increasing for nearly four decades. The One Choice Toolkit offers data, graphics, and ideas and activities to help communities create social norms campaigns, amplifying the voices of youth who are making One Choice to be drug-free.   Objectives By the end of the webinar, participants will: Articulate the One Choice prevention message and the brain science and national substance use trends behind it Identify ways the One Choice message can be successfully integrated into youth-led prevention activities and prevention education materials Access the One Choice Toolkit and brainstorm new resources that could enhance the integration of the One Choice message among prevention groups   Presenters   Caroline DuPont, MD is Vice President of the Institute for Behavior and Health, Inc. (IBH), a 501(c)3 non-profit research and policy organization located in Rockville, MD. The IBH mission is to reduce the use of illegal drugs. In her role as Vice President, Dr. DuPont focuses on the areas of addiction treatment and prevention. She maintains a private practice specializing in anxiety and addiction. Formerly she was the founding President and Principal Investigator of DuPont Clinical Research, Inc., where she directed a team that conducted studies of investigational medication for the anxiety and affective disorders. Dr. DuPont received her MD from the University of Texas Health Sciences Center, Houston and completed her training at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, where for years she held an appointment on the clinical faculty of psychiatry. She is board certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology and by the American Board of Addiction Medicine. She is the co-author of numerous publications and several book chapters on anxiety and addiction.     Nancy Pasquale is Co-founder and Coalition Coordinator of RyeACT Coalition, a Drug Free Communities prevention coalition in Rye, NY. Her professional background is in human resources development and curriculum design, and she served for two terms as an elected Trustee of the Rye City School District Board of Education. Ms. Pasquale is a founding member of the One Choice Community, in partnership with the Institute for Behavior and Health, Inc., and a founding member of K.N.O.W. 2 Prevent, a collaborative of prevention leaders in Westchester County, NY. Nancy is also certified by the National Council for Mental Wellbeing as an instructor of Youth Mental Health First Aid. Ms. Pasquale oversees all programmatic aspects of RyeACT’s operations and serves as Co-Advisor of the Youth Action Team, working directly with youth leaders. Under her stewardship, RyeACT has been recognized by the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) for exemplary leadership in youth prevention and selected to the pilot cohort of CADCA’s Graduate Coalition Academy. Ms. Pasquale has presented at CADCA’s National Leadership Forum, and at national and regional conferences of The American Society of Addiction Medicine, The School-Based Health Alliance, and Youth to Youth International, among others.   Corinne Shea has held several positions at the Institute for Behavior and Health, Inc. since joining the organization in 2007. In her present role as Director of Programs and Communications, she is responsible for the organization and management of drug policy initiatives and projects related to the IBH priorities, including managing the One Choice Community. She directs the writing of research manuscripts, reports, and journal articles. She earned her MA and BA from The George Washington University. Questions? Contact Clarissa Lam Yuen ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: March 2, 2022
Multimedia
    Determinants of Health 360: Social, Commercial, and Legal Considerations for Preventing Substance Misuse   Webinar Date: January 20, 2022   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides for Determinants of Health 360: Social, Commercial, and Legal Considerations for Preventing Substance Misuse   Overview Risky behaviors such as substance misuse don’t occur in a vacuum--the environments in which we live, work, and play influence our choices and behaviors. Exploring Social, Commercial, and Legal Determinants of Health (DOH) can help us consider new ways to impact these environments to prevent substance misuse. This expert panel presentation will discuss ways communities, commerce, and legal systems contribute to substance misuse and how prevention practitioners can support positive DOH to create health and wellness throughout their communities. Bring your questions and experiences, as the panel presentation will conclude with a question and answer/discussion session.   Objectives By the end of this training, participants will be able to: • Describe the concepts of Social, Commercial, and Legal DOH • Name at least one way each can contribute to substance misuse • Name two strategies prevention practitioners can use to support positive DOH   Audience Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level prevention practitioners and allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenter Paul Devereux, PhD, MPH, is an Associate Professor in Social/Behavioral Health at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Public Health. His scholarship explores social and behavioral determinants on health and well-being. Specific research topics include behavioral responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, community-based approaches to cancer screening interventions among diverse populations, how to maintain social support in people with disabilities and parenting adolescents, and emotional health and regulation in older adults. In the approach to his work, Dr. Devereux examines the social and ecological factors that affect population health and how one’s position within the social structure is linked to health outcomes. His research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the CDC, and other state and federal public and private sources. He is the former President of the Nevada Public Health Association and was named Nevada’s Public Health Leader of the Year in 2005.     Eric Crosbie, PhD, MA, is a political scientist who examines commercial determinants of health and public health policy. His research focuses on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and examines how commercial industries like tobacco and food and beverage industries are a key driver of the NCD epidemic and how they influence NCD regulations. Dr. Crosbie's research is local in analyzing smoke-free environments and sugar-sweetened beverage taxation regulations in the U.S. as well as global in examining tobacco and nutrition packaging and labeling policies and the impact of trade on health in Latin America, the Caribbean, Europe, Africa, and the Pacific. Crosbie has both local and international experience collaborating with health organizations and health advocates to educate and disseminate academic research findings to policymakers, including publishing research in Spanish to reach wider audiences. Overall his research is multi-disciplinary combining elements of public health, political science, international relations, economics, law, and business to examine public health policy both locally and globally.   Matthew Moore, JD, MPH, MA, is a Teaching Assistant Professor for the University of Nevada, Reno School of Public Health. A Public Health Attorney, Matthew worked for several years in government and in the nonprofit sector. At the US Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights, he worked with diverse communities to ensure equitable access to health care and to exercise oversight over various covered entities pursuant to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, and other federal civil rights laws. More recently, Matthew worked as a nonprofit attorney, focusing on tobacco control and obesity prevention policy and providing direct legal technical assistance to state and local government agencies, environmental groups, legal aid organizations, and other community stake holders. Matthew’s current research agenda focuses on the ethical and moral dimensions of policy and the law on poverty and economic inequity, as well as on pedagogy in higher education. Recent projects involve the impact of policy on stigmatization of individuals suffering from substance abuse disorder, and a legal analysis of discrimination against homeless individuals in access to emergency shelter during natural disasters.   Webinar Recording View Webinar Recording: Determinants of Health 360: Social, Commercial, and Legal Considerations for Preventing Substance Misuse  
Published: February 3, 2022
Multimedia
  Pacific Southwest PTTC's Unraveling the Mystery of U.S. Alcohol Regulations   Webinar Date: December 15, 2021   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides for Unraveling the Mystery of U.S. Alcohol Regulations *This presentation and the information contained in it is proprietary information of Pam Erickson, and may not be adapted, modified, or disseminated without the prior written permission of Pam Erickson. This presentation is intended to be used by prevention professionals for learning purposes only. This presentation is not 508 compliant.   Webinar Overview and Objectives This presentation aims to "demystify" alcohol regulation. Alcohol regulation is confusing to a lot of people—even regulators! A review of its history helps explain why we regulate the way we do including: why every state is a little different; “control" v. "license" systems; and a three-tier system. Also, the session will indicate how our systems control alcohol problems and point to credible research which confirms the efficacy of system measures.  By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: Describe the history of alcohol in the United States before Prohibition and the problems which led to the 18th Amendment (Prohibition). Explain the Post-Prohibition history including the importance of Toward Liquor Control (a research study) in developing state systems of alcohol regulation. Describe the various systems states use to control alcohol problems: how they work and why they are important. Identify research from credible sources which confirms the efficacy of our systems.   Audience Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level prevention practitioners and allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenter Pam Erickson, President and CEO of Public Action Management, is a passionate leader on alcohol policy issues. Currently, she owns Public Action Management which operates an education campaign for a “Healthy Alcohol Marketplace.” From 1996 to 2003, she directed the Oregon Liquor Control Commission which included licensing, regulatory enforcement and operating Oregon’s distilled spirits business as a "control state". From 2003 to 2007, she worked at Oregon Partnership to direct statewide leadership and media campaigns to reduce underage drinking. Beginning in 2005, she developed the Campaign for a Healthy Alcohol Market, which is an education campaign designed to explain the purpose and objectives of alcohol regulation in simple terms. She has written several reports on deregulation in the United Kingdom and the US and produces a periodic report for policy makers called, “Issue Briefs.” These reports explain how deregulation can lead to increased social problems such as high rates of underage drinking, public order offenses and alcohol related disease. Pam has also served as an expert witness in key alcohol regulation cases in Kentucky, California, Indiana, and Michigan. Her educational materials and legal expert reports/affidavits are available free of charge at www.healthyalcoholmarket.com.   Webinar Recording View Recording of Unraveling the Mystery of U.S. Alcohol Regulations
Published: December 29, 2021
Multimedia
         Pacific Southwest PTTC's Catching the Wind Part 2: How Substance Misuse Prevention Practitioners Can Engage Traditional Media and Leverage Social Media   Webinar Date: November 18, 2021   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides for Catching the Wind Part II: How Substance Misuse Prevention Practitioners Can Engage Traditional Media and Leverage Social Media   Webinar Support Materials: Fentanyl Poster Example from Live Well San Diego Example Press Release for International Overdose Awareness Day Example of a Graphic Organizer Pamphlet: Meth 101 by the San Diego County Meth Strike Force   Overview Join the Pacific Southwest PTTC for a deeper dive into media advocacy with Catching the Wind Part II. Merging your understanding and use of social and traditional media is the key to bringing attention to media advocacy campaigns. Learn what really needs to go into a media release. Find out who really has time to pay attention to your information in a newsroom. Learn to strategize your use of social media to engage traditional   Objectives By the end of the webinar, participants will: Review what media advocacy is and is not Identify strategies for establishing, maintaining, and growing your media relationships Identify tools and resources available to enhance media outreach   Audience Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level prevention practitioners and allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenter Bernard Gonzales possesses extensive experience in broadcast journalism, public relations, government relations, and education. Currently, he operates a small business, GComm Consulting. He is the Media Specialist consultant for The Center for Community Research(CCR). CCR oversees the San Diego County Meth Strike Force, Prescription Drug Abuse Task Force, and Marijuana Prevention Initiative. Prior to that, he was the Senior Council Aide to Chula Vista City Councilmember, now Mayor, Mary Casillas Salas.         Webinar Recording View Recording of Catching the Wind Part II: How Substance Misuse Prevention Practitioners Can Engage Traditional Media and Leverage Social Media
Published: December 1, 2021
Multimedia
         Pacific Southwest PTTC's Catching the Wind: How Substance Misuse Prevention Practitioners Can Engage Traditional Media and Leverage Social Media   Webinar Date: October 20, 2021   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides for Catching the Wind: How Substance Misuse Prevention Practitioners Can Engage Traditional Media and Leverage Social Media   Webinar Support Materials: Fentanyl Poster Example from Live Well San Diego Example Press Release for International Overdose Awareness Day Example of a Graphic Organizer Pamphlet: Meth 101 by the San Diego County Meth Strike Force High Truths Podcast by Dr. Roneet Lev   Overview Your work as a substance misuse prevention practitioner is important and timely. Your data and information are valuable and needed. Your programs are necessary and effective. However, you may have a small budget for outreach. The traditional media has undergone a paradigm shift in the past 20 years. Social media has created a second-by-second news cycle. The result is short attention spans and ultra-competitive platforms for eyes and ears. So, what do we do to get our stories out there? Join this webinar to learn strategies for enhancing your media visibility!   Objectives By the end of the webinar, participants will: Describe what media advocacy is and is not Identify strategies for establishing, maintaining, and growing your media relationships Identify tools and resources available to enhance media outreach   Audience Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level prevention practitioners and allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenter Bernard Gonzales possesses extensive experience in broadcast journalism, public relations, government relations, and education. Currently, he operates a small business, GComm Consulting. He is the Media Specialist consultant for The Center for Community Research(CCR). CCR oversees the San Diego County Meth Strike Force, Prescription Drug Abuse Task Force, and Marijuana Prevention Initiative. Prior to that, he was the Senior Council Aide to Chula Vista City Councilmember, now Mayor, Mary Casillas Salas.         Webinar Recording View Recording of Catching the Wind: How Substance Misuse Prevention Practitioners Can Engage Traditional Media and Leverage Social Media
Published: October 27, 2021
Multimedia
         Pacific Southwest PTTC's Community Engagement During COVID-19: A Webinar for Substance Misuse Prevention Practitioners   Webinar Date: September 22, 2021   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides for Community Engagement During COVID-19: A Webinar for Substance Misuse Prevention Practitioners   Webinar Support Materials: The Center for Community Investment Strategy Triage Tool Jamboard What is Community Engagement YouTube Video Talk They Hear You PSA Example AAUW's How to Build a Phone Tree   Overview While the COVID-19 pandemic has caused restrictions on many options for face-to-face meetings, events, and workshops, community engagement in substance misuse prevention efforts remains essential. This interactive webinar will provide substance misuse prevention practitioners with tools and strategies to increase community engagement during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. Both digital and non-digital strategies will be presented as options for increasing community engagement.   Objectives By the end of this training, participants will be able to: Define community engagement Describe the spectrum of community engagement List at least three non-digital strategies to engage their community in prevention under COVID-19 restrictions List at least three digital strategies to engage their community in prevention under COVID-19 restrictions   Audience Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level prevention practitioners and allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenter Kristen Gabrielsen, MPH, has worked in substance misuse prevention for nearly 30 years. She served as the Associate Director of the Western Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT), co-authored the first Substance Abuse Prevention Specialist Training curriculum, and co-authored the textbook, Substance Abuse Prevention: The Intersection of Science and Practice. She currently works with states and communities across the nation to bridge the gap between research and practice by assisting prevention professionals in maximizing their effectiveness         Webinar Recording View Recoding of Community Engagement During COVID-19: A Webinar for Substance Misuse Prevention Practitioners
Published: October 1, 2021
Multimedia
         Pacific Southwest PTTC's Webinar: Advocating for Advocacy in Prevention   Webinar Date: August 31, 2021   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides for Advocating for Advocacy in Prevention   Webinar Support Materials: San Diego County Marijuana Prevention Initiative 2020 Report 2020 MPI Report Highlights   Overview Advocacy is an important component of substance misuse prevention. Advocacy is a powerful tool that helps to educate and inform policymakers yet is often viewed with some apprehension due to fears of lobbying. This webinar will address advocacy vs. lobbying and define tangible examples of prevention advocacy to support public health and prevention efforts. Specific strategies will be discussed as examples of what prevention practitioners can and should do to advocate for substance misuse prevention in their communities and states.   Objectives By the end of this training, participants will be able to: Be able to identify the differences between lobbying and advocacy as it pertains to substance misuse prevention. Be able to identify data sources that can support advocacy efforts in public health.  Be able to identify their own priority areas for prevention advocacy.   Audience Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level prevention practitioners and allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenter Joe Eberstein works for the Center for Community Research Inc., in San Diego, CA, where he is the Program Manager for the San Diego County (MPI) Marijuana Prevention Initiative. He is also a featured speaker and subject matter expert regarding youth marijuana use and vaping.  His role includes advocating for and raising awareness about the public health effects of substance misuse, marijuana and vaping and coordinating regional prevention campaigns to reduce youth use. He also serves as an advisory board member of SAMSHA’s Region 9 Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC) and is a CA certified prevention specialist.       Webinar Recording View Webinar Recording: Advocating for Advocacy in Prevention
Published: September 8, 2021
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    Selecting Evidence-based Interventions: Finding the  Best Fit    Webinar Date: July 28, 2021   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides for Selecting Evidence-based Interventions: Finding the Best Fit   Webinar Support Materials: Selecting Best-fit Programs and Practices: Guidance for Substance Misuse Prevention Practitioners Guide to Online Registries for Substance Misuse Prevention Evidence-based Programs and Practices How to Conduct a Thorough Literature Search A Primer on How to Read a Scientific Paper for Substance Misuse Prevention Professionals   Overview Prevention leaders are dedicated to improving the health of their communities through effective strategies to reduce substance misuse and its related consequences. Perhaps the most critical decisions prevention staff weigh are what set of interventions to implement, typically with limited resources. This webinar will provide an introduction to best processes and resources available to use when making these critical decisions. Attendees will also be given priority to enroll in a new 6-week distance learning course for in-depth, skill-based and real-world learning and practice in selecting evidence-based programs, practices, and policies.   Objectives By the end of this training, participants will be able to: • Describe key features of an evidence-based intervention • Name at least two locations to locate potential evidence-based interventions • Describe the three conditions for determining the “fit” of an evidence-based intervention   Audience Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level prevention practitioners and allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenter Alyssa O’Hair, MPH, MA, CPS. Alyssa O’Hair is a Senior Manager, Workforce Development at  the Center for the Application of Substance Abuse Technologies (CASAT) at the University of  Nevada, Reno (UNR). With over 10 years of experience providing training and technical  assistance, she currently serves as the Project Director for the Pacific Southwest Prevention  Technology Transfer Center, which aims to build the skills of the substance abuse prevention  workforce. Alyssa has extensive subject matter knowledge in training and technical assistance provision; public health approach for prevention; community needs assessments; data-driven  decision-making; and evaluation design and methodology.   Webinar Recording View Webinar Recording: Selecting Evidence-based Interventions: Finding the Best Fit    
Published: August 4, 2021
Print Media
Sometimes prevention practitioners cannot find a program, policy, or practice that is an acceptable fit for their community on a federal registry or searchable database. The next best place to look is in the peer-reviewed literature to identify other options. This handout provides a brief overview of how to approach searching through peer-reviewed or scientific papers. It outlines steps for conducting an unbiased literature search and includes tips and tricks for a thorough search.   Download the How to Conduct a Thorough Literature Search Handout (pdf)  
Published: July 26, 2021
Print Media
Prevention leaders are dedicated to improving the health of their communities through effective programs and policies to reduce substance misuse and its related consequences. Perhaps the most critical decisions prevention staff weigh are what set of programs and policies to implement, typically with limited resources. In the past, many prevention practitioners relied on a single registry to find potential evidence-based programs and policies that is no longer available. The good news is many other options exist! This document summarizes many available federal registries and online databases where prevention practitioners can begin their search for the “best fit” evidence-based prevention program, policy, or practice.   Download the Guide to Online Registries for Substance Misuse Prevention Evidence-based Programs and Practices Handout (pdf)  
Published: July 26, 2021
Print Media
Reading scientific articles (sometimes referred to as peer-reviewed articles, journal articles, or scientific papers) can be both intimidating and challenging. However, by approaching articles strategically, prevention professionals can glean a great deal of information from scientific papers or journal articles. Learning how to decipher a journal article is crucial for substance misuse prevention professionals, especially during their work on Step 3 (Planning) of the Strategic Prevention Framework. Actions to complete in this step include identifying evidence-based interventions for implementation that are a good conceptual and practical fit. At times, prevention professionals will need to read journal articles to review the research completed on interventions to determine whether an intervention is an appropriate fit for their community and has sufficient evidence of effectiveness to meet local or state standards of evidence. This document is a compilation of resources to assist prevention professionals in enhancing their understanding of peer-reviewed journal articles. Topics covered include what “peer-reviewed” means, the purpose of each section of an article, step-by-step instructions on how to read an article, and types of study designs.   Download the Primer on How to Read a Scientific Paper for Substance Misuse Prevention Professionals (pdf)  
Published: July 26, 2021
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  Part 3: Conducting Online Focus Groups: Best Practices and Innovations   Webinar Date: July 14, 2021 The final webinar of this three-part webinar series will focus on conducting focus groups online. We will review both synchronous and innovative asynchronous options for conducting focus groups virtually and key best practices to ensure high quality data.   Audience Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level prevention practitioners and allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenters Dr. Carol Hagen, PhD is a senior study director at Westat with over 20 years of experience conducting behavioral health research and evaluation with an emphasis on substance abuse prevention. She has extensive experience in needs assessment and evaluation design, questionnaire development, data collection and analysis, and specializes in qualitative methods. Dr. Hagen is also well-versed in the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) and has provided SPF-related training and technical assistance to SAMHSA grantees at national, state/jurisdiction/tribal, and local levels.           Dr. Sandeep Kasat, MBBS, MPH, is a senior epidemiologist at Westat with over 15 years of experience in behavioral health epidemiology, especially as it relates to substance abuse, and using epidemiological data in strategic planning, and decision-making. He leads data analysis and dissemination activities on several projects at Westat. As former director of epidemiology on the Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT) training and technical assistance contract, he has assisted all CSAP-funded states, jurisdictions, and tribes in using and analyzing data to highlight disparities and at-risk populations, create data-guided plans, select evidence-based strategies, inform policy and decision-making, and monitor and evaluate results to assess progress.         Webinar Recording View Webinar Data Collection during COVID-19 Part 3 View Webinar Data Collection during COVID-19 Part 1 View Webinar Data Collection during COVID-19 Part 2   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides for Data Collection during COVID-19 Part 3  
Published: July 20, 2021
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    Part 2: Conducting Online Surveys: Strengthening your Survey Data Collection during COVID-19   Webinar Date: June 16, 2021 Part 2 of this 3-part webinar series is on collecting needs assessment data online! Part 2 will focus specifically on improving survey data collection online. This webinar will weigh key considerations for when collecting survey data online rather than in-person might be preferred and provide important tips for collecting online survey data. By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: Describe how primary data collection fits within the Strategic Prevention Framework. Identify advantages and disadvantages of conducting online surveys. Review general best practices and common pitfalls of conducting online surveys.   Audience Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level prevention practitioners and allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenters Dr. Carol Hagen, PhD is a senior study director at Westat with over 20 years of experience conducting behavioral health research and evaluation with an emphasis on substance abuse prevention. She has extensive experience in needs assessment and evaluation design, questionnaire development, data collection and analysis, and specializes in qualitative methods. Dr. Hagen is also well-versed in the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF) and has provided SPF-related training and technical assistance to SAMHSA grantees at national, state/jurisdiction/tribal, and local levels           Dr. Sandeep Kasat, MBBS, MPH, is a senior epidemiologist at Westat with over 15 years of experience in behavioral health epidemiology, especially as it relates to substance abuse, and using epidemiological data in strategic planning, and decision-making. He leads data analysis and dissemination activities on several projects at Westat. As former director of epidemiology on the Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT) training and technical assistance contract, he has assisted all CSAP-funded states, jurisdictions, and tribes in using and analyzing data to highlight disparities and at-risk populations, create data-guided plans, select evidence-based strategies, inform policy and decision-making, and monitor and evaluate results to assess progress.         Webinar Recording View Webinar Data Collection during COVID-19 Part 2 View Webinar Data Collection during COVID-19 Part 1 View Webinar Data Collection during COVID-19 Part 3   Webinar Slides for Data Collection during COVID-19 Part 2 Webinar Slides   Other Resources Guide to Survey Software, Social Media and QR Codes Capterra Online Survey Software Review The Community Tool Box: Conducting Surveys Harvard University Program on Survey Research
Published: June 30, 2021
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    Webinar: Building a Habit of Cultural Humility in Prevention   Webinar Date: June 10, 2021 The terms cultural humility and cultural competency are often used inter-changeably when in fact, they are very different. This webinar will set a solid foundation for understanding the difference between cultural competency and cultural humility. We will also dig deep into the application of cultural humility for prevention practitioners in their day-to-day work.    Audience Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level prevention practitioners and allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenter Anthony President is the Founder, CEO and Chief Training Officer of Presidential Consultants. Master Trainer, International Speaker and author of the book “Invincible Social Worker”, Anthony President has empowered and inspired more than 100,000 people to perform, produce and partner better at their places of work.  Thousands of companies and organizations have been transformed as a result of Anthony’s work. With over 20 years of facilitation experience, Anthony utilizes a broad range of active learning methodologies to engage and inspire learners to put new ideas into practice creating tangible results for their organizations.            Webinar Recording View Webinar   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides   Other Resources Racial Bias Training Film by Stanley Nelson of Firelight
Published: June 21, 2021
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    Part 1: Conducting Needs Assessments in Virtual Environment: Best Practices, Challenges, and Solutions   Webinar Date: May 26, 2021 The COVID-19 pandemic has forced prevention professionals to move their work into a virtual environment, creating numerous challenges including data collection. The first webinar of this three-part webinar series on collecting data online during a public health emergency will revisit the Strategic Prevention Framework’s (SPF) Step 1: Needs Assessment and describe its increased value during a public health emergency. We will explore general best practices for conducting needs assessments, and discuss methods and resources to support ongoing needs assessment given the current challenging environment, as well as strategies to sustain online data collection beyond the COVID-19 pandemic where it may be preferred than traditional in-person methods in some instances.   Audience Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level prevention practitioners and allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenter Dr. Sandeep Kasat, MBBS, MPH, is a senior epidemiologist at Westat with over 15 years of experience in behavioral health epidemiology, especially as it relates to substance abuse, and using epidemiological data in strategic planning, and decision-making. He leads data analysis and dissemination activities on several projects at Westat. As former director of epidemiology on the Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT) training and technical assistance contract, he has assisted all CSAP-funded states, jurisdictions, and tribes in using and analyzing data to highlight disparities and at-risk populations, create data-guided plans, select evidence-based strategies, inform policy and decision-making, and monitor and evaluate results to assess progress.          Webinar Recording View Webinar Data Collection during COVID-19 Part 1 View Webinar Data Collection during COVID-19 Part 2 View Webinar Data Collection during COVID-19 Part 3   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides for Data Collection during COVID-19 Part 1   Other Resources Westat's Behavioral Health Data Portal Vital Statistics Rapid Release County Health Rankings NORC Opioid Misuse Tool Kaiser Family Foundation SAMHSA Data Sources SAMHSA Data Sources(alcohol) COVID-19 Situation Reports for the Western Pacific Region (including Pacific Island Countries and Territories) Issue Brief: Reports of increases in opioid and other drug related overdose and other concerns during COVID pandemic Substance Use During the Pandemic Mental Health, Substance Use, and Suicidal ideation During the COVID-19 Pandemic - United States, June 24-30, 2020 The Implications of COVID-19 for Mental Health and Substance Use
Published: June 2, 2021
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    Two-Part Webinar Series, Implementation 101: What is the SPF Implementation Step? Part 2   Webinar Date: April 28, 2021   Webinar Description Part 2 of this series will discuss the importance of fidelity especially when making adaptations to a program. This webinar will also cover monitoring, evaluating, and adjusting program strategies and the importance of developing an implementation action plan and what to include in the plan.   Audience Community, tribal, and state-level substance misuse prevention practitioners, allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenters Kristen Gabrielsen, MPH, has worked in substance misuse prevention for nearly 30 years. She served as the Associate Director of the Western Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT), co-authored the first Substance Abuse Prevention Specialist Training curriculum, and co-authored the textbook, Substance Abuse Prevention: The Intersection of Science and Practice. She currently works with states and communities across the nation to bridge the gap between research and practice by assisting prevention professionals in maximizing their effectiveness     Wa’Lynn Klein, Mt. Baker Community Coalition Coordinator has been a member of the Mount Baker community for nearly 20 years. She studies leadership at Trinity Western University and received her Certificate of Prevention Professional from the Prevention Specialist Certification Board of Washington and IC&RC in 2019. A mother of 4, she invests in healthy youth development through volunteer work in her off time. She has a love for prevention, and believes the frameworks, when trusted and followed create magic in community.          Webinar Recording View Webinar   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides   Other Resources Implementation Drivers Handout Overview of SPF Step 4: Implementation Handout National Implementation Research Network Website Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development - Registry of Experimentally Proven Programs
Published: May 10, 2021
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    Two-Part Webinar Series, Implementation 101: What is the SPF Implementation Step? Part 1   Webinar Date: April 27, 2021   Webinar Description and Objectives The first part in this two-part webinar series will delve into the implementation step of the Strategic Prevention Framework. We will discuss what implementation science is and why it is important. This webinar will also cover the three tasks of implementation, how to mobilize support and build capacity, and the importance of implementation drivers.   Audience Community, tribal, and state-level substance misuse prevention practitioners, allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenters Kristen Gabrielsen, MPH, has worked in substance misuse prevention for nearly 30 years. She served as the Associate Director of the Western Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT), co-authored the first Substance Abuse Prevention Specialist Training curriculum, and co-authored the textbook, Substance Abuse Prevention: The Intersection of Science and Practice. She currently works with states and communities across the nation to bridge the gap between research and practice by assisting prevention professionals in maximizing their effectiveness     Wa’Lynn Klein, Mt. Baker Community Coalition Coordinator has been a member of the Mount Baker community for nearly 20 years. She studies leadership at Trinity Western University and received her Certificate of Prevention Professional from the Prevention Specialist Certification Board of Washington and IC&RC in 2019. A mother of 4, she invests in healthy youth development through volunteer work in her off time. She has a love for prevention, and believes the frameworks, when trusted and followed create magic in community.          Webinar Recording View Webinar   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides   Other Resources Implementation Drivers Handout Overview of SPF Step 4: Implementation Handout National Implementation Research Network (NIRN) and University of North Carolina's Implementation Drivers; Assessing Best Practices- Assessment Tool National Implementation Research Network Website  
Published: May 5, 2021
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    Let's Talk: Health Literacy and Health Equity   Webinar Date: March 24, 2021   Webinar Description and Objectives Communication is at the core of everything we do in prevention. There isn't one prevention strategy that doesn't include communication as the foundation. Yet for many of the communities we serve, understanding communication materials can be a challenge. This webinar will discuss health literacy and will provide strategies for prevention practitioners on ensuring that prevention initiatives are communicated and implemented effectively. Remember, if your audience can't understand your message, what is the point? By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: 1.Define health literacy. 2.Explain how literacy is connected to other social inequities and health disparities. 3.Describe the Clear and Simple plan for improving prevention communications.   Audience Community, tribal, and state-level substance misuse prevention practitioners, allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenters Nicole Augustine, MPH, MCHES, PS received her B.A. in Sociology from Cornell University and her Master of Public Health from The George Washington University School of Public Health. She is a passionate public health practitioner, dedicated to the utilization of evidence-based strategies because Prevention Works! With a background in sociology and public health, Nicole constantly evaluates human behavior through the lens of a sociocultural perspective. Utilizing this frame of thought, she provides technical assistance to communities as they address the root causes of substance misuse issues.       Monica Fuller Johnson, CPS, TTS, QP is a Certified Prevention Specialist, Tobacco Treatment Specialist, and Integrated Care Manager. Monica has provided evidence based programming, and educational services for more than 10 years. Mental Health First Aid, Prime for Life, Anger Management, and Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP) are just a few of the national evidence based curriculums that she facilitates.          Webinar Recording View Webinar   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides   Other Resources Health Literacy Handout  National Institute of Health Easy-to-Read Drug Facts      
Published: March 31, 2021
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