Products and Resources Catalog

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Multimedia
Webinar Recording and Follow-Up Materials   Webinar Description What if college graduates entered the prevention workforce with basic knowledge of prevention science, the Strategic Prevention Framework, and the importance of evidence-based programs, practices, and policies? Despite the interdisciplinary nature of substance misuse prevention, traditional college courses often lack explicit content relevant to this critical field. To address this, the Pacific Southwest Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC) developed curriculum infusion packages that can be easily inserted into existing college-level coursework to engage the pre-professional workforce. This webinar will explore the pressing need for capacity-building within the pre-professional workforce, guide participants through the Pacific Southwest PTTC’s curriculum infusion packages, “The Power of Prevention,” and discuss additional ways they can be utilized to develop knowledge and skills for coalition staff, volunteers, and partners. By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: Articulate the need to increase exposure to prevention science and application prior to entering the prevention workforce Describe the benefits of curriculum infusion packages as an innovative method of introducing core prevention concepts Discuss how curriculum infusion packages are useful and accessible across professional roles and can increase prevention knowledge regardless of educational background or status   Webinar Recording and Slides Power of Prevention Recording Power of Prevention Slide Deck   Presenters Michelle Frye-Spray, MS, CPS specializes in integrating prevention science, capacity-building, and workforce development to expedite the adoption and diffusion of evidence-based interventions that achieve intended outcomes. With over 30 years of experience in substance misuse prevention, including 15 years focused on managing and delivering Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) services to states, jurisdictions, and tribes across the western region, she has extensive subject matter expertise in designing and delivering learner-centered, skills-based training and consultations to secondary educators, prevention practitioners, pre-professionals, coalition members, including under-served populations and organizations, on the application of prevention science. As part of her work with SAMSHA’s Northwest Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC), she has chaired and co-chaired the Cannabis Prevention and Community, Coalition, and Collaboration Workgroups, and as a member of the Prevention Workforce Development Workgroup contributed to updating the SPF Application for Success Training (SAPST). Britany Wiele, CPS is a Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) Specialist for the Pacific Southwest Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC), administered by CASAT at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). In this role, she provides direct TTA services to build state, jurisdiction, tribal, and community capacity in the application of data-driven decision-making to the selection, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based programs and practices to prevent substance misuse within the Health and Human Services (HHS) Region 9. Additionally, Ms. Wiele chairs the National PTTC Cannabis Risk Work Group. Prior to her work with CASAT, she served as Program Manager for Join Together Northern Nevada, a substance misuse prevention coalition serving Washoe County, NV where she implemented effective community-wide youth and adult substance misuse prevention programs, developed informational materials, and delivered presentations relating to prevention, drug trends, and other topics to diverse audiences.   Questions Contact Reagan Hart ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: May 30, 2024
Multimedia
Webinar Description The association between chronic exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and poor behavioral health outcomes across the lifespan is well-established, but ACEs are preventable. This webinar will explore the evidence supporting upstream strategies that can prevent ACEs from happening in the first place as well as positive childhood experiences (PCEs) that can mitigate the harms of ACEs. Recent data sources that can be used to monitor ACEs and PCEs at the state-level to guide prevention and evaluation activities will also be explored.   Webinar Objectives By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to: Explain the influence of ACEs and PCEs on risk behaviors using a lifecourse perspective; Describe primary prevention strategies that can prevent ACEs; Describe how PCEs can buffer the impact of ACEs on behavioral health outcomes; Identify state-level data sources that can be used to monitor ACEs and PCEs.   Presenters Amanda Haboush-Deloye earned her Ph.D. in experimental psychology and her Master of Arts in clinical psychology from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Amanda's research background is on mental health in adolescent, adult, and older adult populations. She also has a particular interest in improving research methods to be more culturally competent. As a researcher at NICRP, she has designed and implemented many research projects regarding children's physical health, mental health, and education, as well as children's advocacy initiatives such as Every Child Matters in Nevada and Prevent Child Abuse Nevada. Being a Las Vegas native, Amanda aims to remain in Nevada and work with NICRP to create a healthy community where families and children are a priority.   Kristin Clements-Nolle received her MPH in Behavioral Sciences and Ph.D in Epidemiology, both from the University of California, Berkeley. Kristen is a nationally recognized adolescent health researcher and has published extensively on the impact of ACE exposure on health outcomes across the lifespan. She also investigates social, community, and family factors that can prevent ACE exposure and/or mitigate the impact on behavioral health outcomes. Kristen is currently a Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Public Health and the principal investigator for a five year grant funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that will focus on preventing ACEs and promoting positive childhood experiences in Nevada.   Post Webinar Materials Preventing ACEs and Their Associated Harms Recording Preventing ACEs and Their Associated Harms Slide Deck   Questions Please email Reagan Hart at ([email protected]) for any questions.
Published: May 2, 2024
Multimedia
Webinar Description Join us for a webinar highlighting the incredible work of the Help Enrich African American Lives (HEAAL) Coalition and Youth Taking Charge (YTC) in enriching the quality of African American lives through community engagement and collaboration. This presentation will focus on data-driven prevention strategies that have been successfully implemented to address and decrease youth substance use in urban and inner-city environments. Through the collaborative efforts of HEAAL and YTC, we aim to identify needs and develop prevention strategies that support healthy decision-making for better lifestyle outcomes. Don't miss this opportunity to learn about effective approaches to youth substance use prevention in our communities. By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to: Identify evidence-based strategies used to address substance misuse in urban/inner-cities. Examine the individual and collective risk factors and analyze WIIFM's of youth in urban/inner-cities. Explore the What's In It For Me (WIIFMs) to engage youth participation in substance misuse prevention programs.   Webinar Recording and Slides HEAAL & YTC Webinar Recording HEAAL & YTC Webinar Slide Deck (PDF)   Presenters Clyde R. Miller Jr., a native of Washington DC, has been involved in the Phoenix community since 2000. Clyde has a made a lifelong commitment to the communities in Maricopa County and is actively engaged in making it a healthier and safer place to live, work and play. He is currently the Coalition Coordinator for the Help Enrich African American Lives (HEAAL) Coalition, an arm of Tanner Community Development Corporation (TCDC). Mr. Miller feels that it is important that we become involved in the business of AZ, the wellness of us together. Mr. Miller is married to Melonie Miller and a member of First New Life Church in Phoenix, AZ. Loren V. Grizzard is Program Manager at Tanner Community Development Corporation (TCDC) which is the nonprofit community outreach for Tanner Chapel A.M.E. Church.  One of the programs in TCDC is the Help Enrich African American Lives Coalition (HEAAL), which provides adult/youth community education, and advocacy that increases the perception of harm of youth alcohol, marijuana, and prescription drug use/abuse.  These community-based prevention activities are planned by coalition volunteers and implemented through churches, schools, and community agencies targeting African American youth and communities at large in Maricopa County, AZ.  Loren has 15 years experience in substance misuse prevention for youth and caregivers. Loren has 20+ years of experience in the electronics industry working for Motorola, On Semiconductor, and Intel as a process engineering technician.  He also worked for the East Valley Institute of Technology as a state report coordinator and mathematics/reading enrichment support technician. Youth Taking Charge (YTC) is a youth subgroup of Help Enrich African American Lives (HEAAL) Coalition which is the substance misuse prevention program of Tanner Community Development Corporation (TCDC). YTC’s mission is to help inform youth about the risks of substance misuse, by identifying needs and developing strategies that support good decision making and better lifelong habits for healthier physical, mental, and emotional wellness.   Questions Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: April 12, 2024
Multimedia
Webinar Recording and Follow-Up Materials  January 23, 2024   Webinar Description According to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the college years are a time when students may experiment with drugs for the first time. This is why college is the ideal setting for innovative, campus-wide programming aimed at preventing and reducing drug use among college students. This session will include an overview of current drug use rates among college students; the DEA’s updated strategic planning guide for preventing drug misuse among college students; successes and challenges experienced by colleges and universities applying the Strategic Prevention Framework to their efforts; seven keys to a successful prevention program; and DEA's resources for professionals working to prevent drug misuse among college students.     Webinar Objectives By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to: Discuss DEA's updated strategic planning guide to preventing drug misuse among college students Examine campus successes and challenges in applying the Strategic Prevention Framework to preventing drug use and misuse among college students Find DEA’s resources for professionals working to prevent drug misuse among college students   Webinar Recording and Slides Preventing Drug Misuse among College Students Recording Preventing Drug Misuse among College Students Slide Deck (PDF) Preventing Drug Misuse among College Students Planning Guide   Presenters Rich Lucey has more than three decades of experience at the state and federal government levels working to prevent alcohol and drug use and misuse among youth and young adults, especially college students. He currently serves as a senior prevention program manager in the Drug Enforcement Administration’s Community Outreach and Prevention Support Section. Rich plans and executes educational and public information programs, evaluates program goals and outcomes, and serves as an advisor to the Section Chief and other DEA officials on drug misuse prevention and education programs. Rich formerly served as special assistant to the director for the federal Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, and worked as an education program specialist in the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools. Erin Ficker, MPAff, CPRS, is an expert in substance misuse prevention, an accomplished training and technical assistance (T/TA) provider and a certified senior prevention specialist. She brings extensive expertise in supporting, designing, and delivering engaging professional learning, and providing comprehensive T/TA for states and community level prevention professionals. For over 18 years, she has built the capacity of clients to perform prevention work effectively using the Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF). She has in-depth knowledge and training experience in the SPF process, including specific work in evaluation, sustainability, assessment, and working with diverse populations. Erin currently serves as a regional director in SAMHSA’s Strategic Prevention Technical Assistance Center (SPTAC) working to provide training and technical assistance to SAMHSA state and community grantees across HHS Regions 5 and 8. She also serves as a prevention manager for the Great Lakes Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC) providing services to a wide range of prevention and behavioral health specialists. Erin holds an MPA in Domestic and Social Policy from the University of Texas-Austin and a BA in Sociology from The Evergreen State College. She also holds a certification as a Senior Prevention Specialist through the Illinois Certification Board. Peggy Glider, PhD., has recently retired from the University of Arizona where she served as the Coordinator of Evaluation and Research for the Campus Health Service for 30 years. She has served as Principal Investigator, Project Director and/or Evaluator on multiple federal and state research demonstration grants in the alcohol, other drug, violence and mental health arenas within higher education. Dr. Glider and her team worked to increase evaluation capacity within Campus Health as well as with campus partners to ensure appropriate data was collected and utilized to improve programming and services for students. She has also served as the statewide evaluator for the Arizona Strategic Prevention Framework (SPF)-Partnership for Success (PFS) grant. Under this grant, she trained each of the 12 subgrantees across the state in the SPF. She has presented many workshops and presentations at national meetings, focusing on program evaluation, often using the SPF as a guiding tool. Dr. Glider earned three degrees at the University of Arizona: a Doctor of Philosophy, a Master of Arts in Educational Psychology, and a Bachelor’s Degree in Education.   Questions   Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: February 16, 2024
Multimedia
Learning Session Recording and  Follow-Up Materials  December 12, 2023   Learning Session Description Health and health equity are determined by the conditions in which the American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) population have been exposed to and continue to thrive in. This Learning Session will explore the common determinants of health that contribute to substance use among AI/AN populations. Further exploration of how common traditional AI/AN healing practices and approaches are integrated with substance use prevention programming will be discussed.     Learning Session Objectives By the end of this learning session, participants will be able to: Explain how Social Determinants of Health have contributed to substance use in AI/AN populations. Discuss the “Culture is Prevention” approach in the work of substance use prevention work. Identify common AI/AN cultural approaches and practices used in AI/AN healthcare systems addressing Substance Use and Abuse. Employ strategies to meaningfully and respectfully collaborate with tribal entities.   Learning Session Recording and Slides Prioritizing Equity in Prevention Recording Prioritizing Equity in Prevention Slide Deck (PDF)   Presenter Evelina Maho, MAdm.,  is a member of the Navajo tribe and resides in Northern Arizona. Holds a Master’s Degree in Administration with an emphasis in Health Sciences, Undergraduate Degree in Clinical Dietetics and Chemistry from Northern Arizona University; carries executive leadership and directorship experience in the healthcare arena. Evelina currently works with the National Council for Urban Indian Health (NCUIH). At NCUIH, supports over 41 Urban Indian Health Organizations in the US. Evelina’s experience involves working with AI/AN Health Systems through quality and systems change approach. Her career started and also continues to support Public Health in AI/AN healthcare systems. Part-owner and founder of YM Associates, LLC a newly established consulting business involved with public health projects. In addition, enjoys teaching as an Adjunct Faculty member at Falmouth Institute in her spare time.   Questions Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this learning session.
Published: January 19, 2024
Curriculum Package
Pre-Session Learning Activity: 30 minutes In-Class Learning Activity: 50 minutes Instructor Packet Student Packet Slide Deck   Purpose To create a dynamic and engaging learning experience where students can explore, discuss, and apply their understanding of the factors influencing substance use and misuse through individual and interactive activities.   Learning Objectives Define Modifiable and Nonmodifiable risk and protective factors. Identify the four levels in the CDC’s Social-Ecological Framework for Prevention. List at least four research-based risk and protective factors for substance misuse across the lifespan    
Published: December 14, 2023
Curriculum Package
Pre-Session Learning Activity: 30 minutes In-Class Learning Activity: 50 minutes Instructor Packet Student Packet Slide Deck   Purpose To enable students to understand Social Determinants of Health and their influence on substance use and misuse through individual and interactive activities.   Learning Objectives Describe each component of the Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) and connect these to health promotion and prevention. Explain the importance of health equity in promoting protection and reducing risk for substance misuse.    
Published: December 14, 2023
Curriculum Package
Pre-Session Learning Activity: 30 minutes In-Class Learning Activity: 30 minutes Instructor Packet Student Packet Slide Deck   Purpose To enable students to understand the significance of substance use prevention, categorize prevention approaches, understand the spectrum of behavioral health care services, and apply the concepts through individual and interactive activities.   Learning Objectives Categorize the four types of behavioral health services by each of the Spectrum of Mental Emotional and Behavioral Health. Characterize Universal, Selective, and Indicated prevention services through an application activity.    
Published: December 14, 2023
Curriculum Package
Pre-Session Learning Activity: 30 minutes In-Class Learning Activity: 30 minutes Instructor Packet Student Packet Slide Deck   Purpose To help students define substance misuse prevention by distinguishing between upstream and downstream approaches and then applying these concepts through a combination of individual and interactive activities.   Learning Objectives Distinguish Substance use prevention from substance use treatment. Explain the shift from “downstream” to “upstream” approaches to public health    
Published: December 14, 2023
Multimedia
  Logic Models and the Theory of Change, Part 2 November 28, 2023   Description During this 90-minute skill-building session, participants will receive a recap from part one of the series and then dive into the importance of clearly understanding how the logic model is dependent on a clear and articulate theory of change. Using real-world examples from the Pacific Southwest PTTC region, participants will learn to determine if a logic model effectively incorporates a theory of change into its design. Then, during breakout sessions, the participants will be able to use their own program’s logic model or utilize an example provided, to develop their own 90-second “elevator speech” related to the theory of change.    Objectives By the end of this session, participants will be able to:  Explore where the theory of change is embedded into a logic model. Compare different logic model's use of a theory of change. Articulate a theory of change.   Learning Session Recording and Slides Logic Models and the Theory of Change, Part 2 Recording Logic Models and the Theory of Change, Part 2 Slide Deck (PDF)   Presenter Kyle Barrington, Ph.D., serves as the Principal Investigator on multiple projects related to substance abuse misuse, substance abuse treatment, and suicide prevention. For the past 23 years, as the Principal Investigator for Zajonc Corporation, he has served as a subject matter expert and supported the development of training on topics ranging from implementing evidence-based programs, using evidence-based programs to reduce risk-taking behaviors on college campuses, sustaining effective practices, and evaluating environmental strategies. In addition, he has utilized research results to help secure over $650 million in funding for rural and low-income communities.    Questions Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this learning session.
Published: December 12, 2023
Multimedia
    Logic Models and the Theory of Change, Part 1 November 7, 2023   Webinar Description During this one-hour webinar, participants will develop a better understanding of why logic models are essential to those in the field of substance abuse prevention/substance misuse prevention or intervention. Participants will leave the first part of this training with an understanding of the essential components of a logic model, how logic models can help make the prevention specialist's job easier and more sustainable, and the role that the theory of change plays in creating a usable logic model.     Objectives By the end of this session, participants will be able to:  Identify the benefits of using logic models. Define the key components of a logic model. Describe why a theory of change should be embedded into the logic model.   Learning Session Recording and Slides Logic Models and the Theory of Change, Part 1 Recording Logic Models and the Theory of Change, Part 1 Slide Deck (PDF)   Presenter   Kyle Barrington, Ph.D., serves as the Principal Investigator on multiple projects related to substance abuse misuse, substance abuse treatment, and suicide prevention. For the past 23 years, as the Principal Investigator for Zajonc Corporation, he has served as a subject matter expert and supported the development of training on topics ranging from implementing evidence-based programs, using evidence-based programs to reduce risk-taking behaviors on college campuses, sustaining effective practices, and evaluating environmental strategies. In addition, he has utilized research results to help secure over $650 million in funding for rural and low-income communities.    Questions Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this learning session.
Published: November 21, 2023
Print Media
One of the most common struggles for prevention coalitions and organizations is finding adequate and sustained funding to continue effective interventions. This resource guide aims to support communities, coalitions, and jurisdictions in diversifying funding to implement evidence-based programs and policies and sustain the effective outcomes they provide. Download Diversifying Prevention Funding PDF  
Published: October 24, 2023
Multimedia
    Considering the Associations Between Substance Use and Suicide September 7, 2023   Webinar Description September is National Suicide Prevention Awareness Month. For this month's Monthly Media Series webinar, the Pacific Southwest PTTC would like to raise awareness on this preventable issue and highlight the important intersection between substance use and suicide.  In this webinar, we will consider alcohol-related risk factors for suicide, including ways in which alcohol use can impact decision making when a person is experiencing distress. We will also review the recent literature on cannabis, focusing on mental health concerns associated with the use of high-potency cannabis, as well as associations between cannabis use disorder and suicide risk. Implications for prevention, intervention, and public health will be discussed   Objectives By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to: Define “alcohol myopia” and how this relates to suicide risk. Identify a screening measure for cannabis use disorder. Describe at least one potential unwanted outcome associated with the use of high-potency cannabis. Discuss at least one implication for prevention, intervention, and public health.   Webinar Recording and Presentation Handout Considering the Associations Between Substance Use and Suicide Recording Considering the Associations Between Substance Use and Suicide Presentation Handout (PDF) *This presentation and all information contained within it is proprietary information of Dr. Jason Kilmer, Ph.D., and may not be adapted, modified, or disseminated without prior written consent of Dr. Kilmer. This presentation is intended to be used by prevention professionals for learning purposes only. This presentation is not ADA compliant.   Presenter Dr. Jason Kilmer, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington (UW) School of Medicine and an Adjunct Associate Professor in Psychology at UW. Jason serves as an investigator on several studies evaluating prevention and intervention efforts for alcohol, cannabis, and other drug use by college students. In addition to research and teaching, he has worked extensively with college students and student groups around alcohol and other drug prevention programming and presentations throughout his career (including student athletes, fraternity and sorority members, residence life, and first-year students), both at UW and on over 125 campuses across the nation.    As faculty in the School of Medicine, Jason continues his direct work with students through presentations for intercollegiate athletics and residence life. Jason also serves as the chairperson of Washington state's College Coalition on Substance misuse, Advocacy, and Prevention (CCSAP)   Questions Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: September 21, 2023
Multimedia
    Prioritizing Equity in Prevention Series: The Role of Prevention in Addressing Alcohol Use in the U.S. Military August 22, 2023   Learning Session Description U.S. military personnel are particularly vulnerable to a number of health disparities due to their occupational stresses, hazards, and environments. These include frequent geographic relocations due to changing duty stations, undergoing deployments, and balancing work-life demands (e.g., supporting their families). Each of these factors contribute to alcohol misuse on their own, and taken together, create a high-risk setting for military personnel. Additionally, concern for potentially career-ending ramifications keep many personnel from seeking treatment or support. Military personnel report binge drinking at higher levels than the U.S. civilian population: in 2018, 34% of active duty personnel binge drank in the past 30 days compared to 27% of U.S. adults age 18 and older. This population also experiences extensive harms, including violence, injury, poor work performance, and potential harm to careers. This Learning Session will discuss the risk and protective factors that contribute to the military alcohol environment, drawing parallels between colleges and the military as institutions with unique opportunities for prevention efforts to promote health equity within this population. Participants will have the opportunity to assess the potential alcohol-related issues specific to the military population in their jurisdiction and develop a plan for collaborating with the military community to address these issues.   Objectives In this learning session, participants will: Describe alcohol consumption and harms specific to military personnel Discuss risk and protective factors that contribute to the alcohol environment on and around military installations Determine opportunities for collaboration in the prevention of excessive alcohol consumption among military personnel   Learning Session Recording and Slides The Role of Prevention in Addressing Alcohol Use in the U.S. Military Recording The Role of Prevention in Addressing Alcohol Use in the U.S. Military Slide Deck (PDF)   Presenter Alicia Sparks, PhD, MPH, is the Chair of the U.S. Alcohol Policy Alliance and a Senior Principal at Synergy Enterprises, where she serves as the Project Director for NIAAA’s APIS contract, as well as SAMHSA’s STOP Act contract. Dr. Sparks served as Project Director for CDC’s alcohol advertising monitoring project, for which she directed a team of researchers in conducting analyses of Nielsen data to determine alcohol industry compliance with self-governed rules on advertising alcohol to youth audiences. She has more than 12 years of experience in alcohol policy research, including designing, implementing, and evaluating studies, programs, and policies. Dr. Sparks has led the development of numerous publications on alcohol policy, including the 2022 Implementing Community-Level Policies to Prevent Alcohol Misuse evidence-based resource guide and the 2016 Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health. She has published more than 20 peer-reviewed manuscripts and has presented at more than a dozen conferences. She is co-chair of the Alcohol Policy conference series and serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of the Global Alcohol Policy Conference.   Questions Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this learning session.
Published: September 7, 2023
Multimedia
  May 17, 2023   Webinar Description Substance use is the second most identified health disparity issue in rural Hawaiian communities. Native Hawaiian youth report the highest rates of substance use, especially early initiation, and the highest need for substance and alcohol treatment among ethnic groups in Hawai‘i. This Learning Session will present an overview of youth substance use in Hawai‘i and briefly explore regional and ethnic differences in the data. It will also discuss risk and protective factors for substance use in the broader Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (NHPI) community, and will present a cultural and social determinants of health framework that could be utilized to address substance use prevention among NHPI populations.   Objectives By the end of this learning session, participants will be able to: Describe trends in youth substance use in Hawai‘i Discuss risk and protective factors for substance use in the NHPI community Analyze cultural and social determinants of health to address substance use prevention among NHPI populations   Webinar Recording and Slides Recording for Cultural & Social Determinants in Prevention among Native Hawaiian & Pacific Islander Communities Slide Deck for Cultural & Social Determinants in Prevention among Native Hawaiian & Pacific Islander Communities   Presenters Dr. Sarah Momilani Marshall, PhD, MSW, is a Native Hawaiian Postdoctoral Researcher with the University of Hawai'i Cancer Center. Her program of research concentrates on understanding social and behavioral determinants of health within rural Hawaiian communities, especially those that impact substance use resistance among Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander youth. She is currently involved in research examining the sustainability of a culturally-grounded drug abuse prevention curriculum developed for Hawai‘i Island public schools and a newly funded study that  focuses on the development and evaluation of an ENDS (electronic nicotine delivery system) prevention intervention for rural Hawaiian youth. She has recently been approved for a pilot study which will explore parental influences on Native Hawaiian youth substance use resistance. In August she will transition into her new position as an Assistant Professor at the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa’s Thompson School of Social Work and Public Health.   Questions For any other questions, please contact Britany Weile ([email protected]).
Published: June 16, 2023
Multimedia
  IC&RC Prevention Specialist Certification: What, Why, and How A Panel Presentation May 10, 2023   Panel Presentation Description Regardless of the service, those seeking a provider want to be sure that that person is both competent and ethical. This is especially important when the services are human services, such as prevention of substance misuse and mental illness. The International Certification and Reciprocity Consortium is the only organization that certifies prevention providers. Featuring a representative from each state or jurisdiction’s certification board, this panel presentation will discuss the need and process of becoming certified as a Prevention Specialist as well as highlight information about board-specific requirements and application procedures. By the end of this panel presentation, participants will be able to: Identify at least three reasons why certification of prevention specialists is important Outline the international process for certifying prevention specialists Describe the international prevention certification examination and its development List the certification requirements for their specific state or jurisdiction   Learning Session Materials IC&RC Certified Prevention Specialist Presentation Slides (pdf) IC&RC Certified Prevention Specialist Presentation Recording     Presenter Sandra Puerini Del Sesto, M.Ed, ACPS, is a consultant and master trainer who has provided community and strategic planning, program development, and capacity building in all areas of prevention practice throughout the United States. She was the founder and for 30 years the executive director of a statewide, multi-service prevention program and a founder of Rhode Island’s largest non-profit treatment program. In addition to her prevention work, she was the founding director of the Institute for Addiction Recovery at Rhode Island College. Sandra is a delegate to and the former Prevention Committee Co-Chair of the IC&RC. She is a member of the faculty and advisory board of the New England School of Addiction Studies, a member of the Advisory Board for the National Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC), the National Hispanic/Latino PTTC and the New England PTTC. Sandra is a co-author of SAMHSA’s Substance Abuse Prevention Specialist Training (SAPST) and its Basic and Advanced Prevention Ethics as well as many other courses and webinars. She has previously trained members of the US National Guard in prevention planning. Sandra received her Bachelor’s degree in psychology from Boston College (Newton), and her Master’s degree in counselor education from Rhode Island College. She also completed a certificate program in nonprofit management through Brown University in Providence. Ms. Del Sesto is an Advanced Certified Prevention Specialist. Certification Board Panelists Wayne Giles Arizona Board for Certification of Addiction Counselors Pete Nielson California Consortium of Addiction Programs and Professionals Angela Bolan Hawaii Department of Health, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Division Britany Wiele (on behalf of Natalie Powell) Nevada Certification Board James Arriola Pacific Behavioral Health Council and Certification Board   Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: May 19, 2023
Multimedia
Media in Prevention: A three-part webinar series Webinar 2: Media Literacy as a Practical and Transferrable Skill April 11, 2023   Series Description Effectively using social media platforms and being media literate is critically important in a digital age. Improving prevention practitioners’ media literacy and their use of social media platforms can enhance communication with key audiences and result in more effective prevention efforts. This three-part webinar series aims to do this by helping participants better understand core concepts such as media literacy, social media strategies, and the role of advertising in substance use, and develop skills to think critically about social media, its’ messages, and its role in prevention. Webinar Description Digital environments are overloaded with information coming from many directions, and this can be difficult to navigate.  In a time of mis and disinformation, it is important to learn for ourselves and to help others how to verify credible sources of information. Media literacy education offers a set of skills to critically think about the source and content of the messages we consume.  In this webinar, we will discuss ways to become more media literate using questions, lateral reading, and recognizing signs of misinformation. This will involve practice activities, Q&A, and small group discussions to best explore this relevant topic. Objectives In this webinar, participants will explore understanding the skills required to actively inquire and critically think about messages we receive and create.  These skills include: Verifying sources of information to find and use credible sources. Lateral reading of content across multiple sources. Key questions to ask to evaluate information in media.   Webinar Recording and Slides Media in Prevention Webinar 2: Media Literacy-Practical and Transferrable Recording Media in Prevention Webinar 2: Media Literacy-Practical and Transferrable slide deck (PDF)   Additional Resources Alcohol Awareness Toolkit, Northwest Prevention Technology Transfer Center NAMLE - Key Questions to Ask When Analyzing Media Messages Infographic - How to Recognize Misinformation Media Literacy Resources-PTTC Presenter Shawn Domgaard is a 5th year PhD student (ABD, all but dissertation) at Washington State University, received a Master’s of Arts degree from Southern Utah University in Professional Communication. Shawn is happily married to his lovely wife Rachel, and they have three children.  He is originally from a small farm in northeastern Utah and loves to hike, draw, and play with his kids.  His goal in life is to help other people make evidence-based decisions that make their life better. Questions Contact Kathy Gardner ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: April 13, 2023
Multimedia
Media in Prevention: A three-part webinar series Webinar 1: Social Media Best Practices March 21, 2023   Series Description Effectively using social media platforms and being media literate is critically important in a digital age. Improving prevention practitioners’ media literacy and their use of social media platforms can enhance communication with key audiences and result in more effective prevention efforts. This three-part webinar series aims to do this by helping participants better understand core concepts such as media literacy, social media strategies, and the role of advertising in substance use, and develop skills to think critically about social media, its’ messages, and its role in prevention. Webinar Description The art of effective social media marketing requires that an organization be adept at creating targeted and tailored content that speaks to right person, in the right way at the right time. Social media campaigns are designed with a series of unique pillars in mind that are all vital when working in tandem with a broader communication strategy. In this session we will discuss six steps of social media strategy framework. The session will begin with an overview on social media strategy and continue through the steps. Interactive activities will be sprinkled throughout, as well as prompts for discussion and sharing. Objectives In this webinar, participants will explore: Understand six core principles of creating a social media strategy. Conceptualize what makes a social media campaign strategic with customer experience at the center.  Ability to apply learning to create a social media strategy framework for that includes a strategic approach to identifying audience, selecting platforms, designing content, amplifying distribution, campaign implementation, and metrics.   Webinar Recording and Slides Media in Prevention Webinar 1: Social Media Best Practices Recording Media in Prevention Webinar 1: Social Media Best Practices slide deck (PDF)   Additional Resources Alcohol Awareness Toolkit, Northwest Prevention Technology Transfer Center Not Your Mother's Scare Tactics, Prevention Solutions@EDC Recommended Reading & Resources from the Presenter Digital Campaign Planning Template Presenter Rebecca Cooney is a Scholarly Associate Professor of Strategic Communication at The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University. Other roles include Director of Murrow Online Programs and Co-Investigator for the Center of Excellence for Natural Product-Drug Interaction Research. Rebecca is an educator in integrated marketing communication strategy, training facilitator, and entrepreneur specializing in multi-modal curriculum development and learning experience design (LXD). She teaches courses in branding and consumer behavior, advertising, and digital marketing strategy. She is professionally certified in LXD and holds a BA and MA in communication. Questions Contact Kathy Gardner ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: April 4, 2023
Multimedia
Preventing Underage Drinking and Excessive Drinking among Adults through Alcohol Policy Webinar 3: The How - A Proven and Practical Model To Guide the Development of Local Alcohol Policies   March 15, 2023   Webinar Overview and Objectives This is the third part of a 3-part series focused on alcohol policy. In collaboration with the Southeast PTTC and the US Alcohol Policy Alliance, this interactive webinar provides an answer to the question, ‘How do we do alcohol policy at the local level?’ The session will provide an overview of The 10-step Policy Adoption Model utilized by the Southeast PTTC. In this webinar, participants will explore: How to identify coalition strengths and challenges related to policy development and implementation Understand the five internal steps of the Policy Adoption Model necessary to prepare a policy for public discussion, debate and support Learn the five external steps of the policy process with an emphasis on media advocacy, community organizing and post-adoption policy compliance    Learning Session Materials Recording for Webinar 3: The How - A  Proven and Practical Model to Guide the Development of Local Alcohol Policies Slide Deck for Webinar 3: The How - A Proven and Practical Model to Guide the Development of Local Alcohol Policies (PDF)   Additional Resources  Equitable Enforcement to Achieve Health Equity, an introductory guide for policy Makers & Practitioners Data Collection for Alcohol Policy Change, A toolkit for Local Coalitions Implementing Policy to Prevent Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drug Misuse: A Guidebook   Recordings for Other Sessions Recording for Webinar 1: The Why - Alcohol Policy: A Community Approach to Reduce Community Harms Recording for Webinar 2: The What - Evidence-Based Alcohol Policies to Reduce Community Level Harms   Presenters: Michael Sparks is an Alcohol Policy Specialist and President of Sparks Initiatives. His primary interest is in assisting communities to implement evidence-based environmental strategies to reduce alcohol and other drug problems. Among others, Michael is currently working with Wake Forest University, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Foundation and Health Foundation of South Florida on a range of public health issues. He currently serves as the Co-Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of the US Alcohol Policy Alliance.       Kristin Kidd is Director of the North Carolina Behavioral Health Equity Initiative. This project collaborates with North Carolina agencies and communities to address the structural or root causes of behavioral health inequities in historically underserved neighborhoods and communities of color. Kristin also provides local policy training and technical assistance for the SAMHSA-funded Southeast Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC) at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. She has developed and delivered both synchronous and asynchronous trainings focused on the policy process across the region and internationally. Prior to joining the Southeast PTTC, Kristin led the Tobacco Control Training and Technical Assistant Team at the Colorado School of Public Health. Her team provided statewide advocacy and policy guidance to local health agencies focused on eliminating tobacco-related disparities. Kristin collaborated with multiple Colorado communities to pass                                               local tobacco control policies such as retailer licensing and expanded smoke-free/vape-free ordinances.   Sara Cooley Broschart leads the newly established Center for Advancing Alcohol Science to Practice. Sara is a public health leader with over a decade of experience in substance use prevention at local, regional and state levels. Contribution to community has been a driving value, and she is thrilled to work with communities nationwide in her new role. Her experience includes advising alcohol and marijuana regulators on policy and best practices, developing innovative methods to engage community voices in policy making activities, building a statewide alcohol policy alliance from the ground up, and establishing a health network in rural Nicaragua. Sara has done extensive graduate work in Cultural Anthropology and Public Health at the University of Michigan and holds a BA in Biology and Anthropology from the University of Virginia.     Snigdha Peddireddy is a Fellow currently supporting the Training and Technical Assistance Center and Alcohol Action Network. She is an early-career alcohol and other drug policy researcher with expertise in policy evaluation and statistical modeling methods. Broadly, Snigdha studies the impacts of structural determinants on inequities in substance use-related harms. She is a current PhD student at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health. Snigdha also holds an MPH in Health Behavior from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a BS in Neuroscience from Duke University.       Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: March 31, 2023
Multimedia
Preventing Underage Drinking and Excessive Drinking among Adults through Alcohol Policy Webinar 2: The What - Evidence-Based Alcohol Policies to Reduce Community Level Harms   February 22, 2023   Webinar Overview and Objectives In collaboration with the Southeast PTTC, Center for Advancing Alcohol Science to Practice, and the US Alcohol Policy Alliance, interactive webinar #2 details alcohol policy strategies that can be effective in reducing excessive and underage drinking, and their associated community-level harms. This webinar will cover a range of strategies and their levels of effectiveness. In this webinar, participants will explore: How alcohol policy strategies can address excessive and underage drinking at the community level Which alcohol policy strategies are being used in communities across the country How these policy strategies complement the prevention work already happening in local communities   Webinar Materials Recording for Webinar 2: The What - Evidence-Based Alcohol Policies to Reduce Community Level Harms Slide Deck for Webinar 2: The What - Evidence-Based Alcohol Policies to Reduce Community Level Harms (PDF) Local Alcohol Policy Exploration Worksheet   Additional Resources  Center for Advancing Alcohol Science to Practice Alcohol: No Ordinary Commodity, Third Edition, Baro, Casswe.., Graham, Huckle, Livingston, Osterberg, Rehm, Room, Rossow, Sornpaisarn   Recordings for Other Sessions Recording for Webinar 1: The Why - Alcohol Policy: A Community Approach to Reduce Community Harms Recording for Webinar 3: The How - A  Proven and Practical Model to Guide the Development of Local Alcohol Policies   Presenters: Michael Sparks is an Alcohol Policy Specialist and President of SparksInitiatives. His primary interest is in assisting communities to implement evidence-based environmental strategies to reduce alcohol and other drug problems. Among others, Michael is currently working with Wake Forest University, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Foundation and Health Foundation of South Florida on a range of public health issues. He currently serves as the Co-Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of the US Alcohol Policy Alliance.       Sara Cooley Broschart leads the newly established Center for Advancing Alcohol Science to Practice. Sara is a public health leader with over a decade of experience in substance use prevention at local, regional and state levels. Contribution to community has been a driving value, and she is thrilled to work with communities nationwide in her new role. Her experience includes advising alcohol and marijuana regulators on policy and best practices, developing innovative methods to engage community voices in policy making activities, building a statewide alcohol policy alliance from the ground up, and establishing a health network in rural Nicaragua. Sara has done extensive graduate work in Cultural Anthropology and Public Health at the University of Michigan and holds a BA in Biology and Anthropology from the University of Virginia.       Snigdha Peddireddy is a Fellow currently supporting the Training and Technical Assistance Center and Alcohol Action Network. She is an early-career alcohol and other drug policy researcher with expertise in policy evaluation and statistical modeling methods. Broadly, Snigdha studies the impacts of structural determinants on inequities in substance use-related harms. She is a current PhD student at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health. Snigdha also holds an MPH in Health Behavior from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a BS in Neuroscience from Duke University.     Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: March 9, 2023
Multimedia
Preventing Underage Drinking and Excessive Drinking among Adults through Alcohol Policy Webinar 1: The Why - Alcohol Policy: A Community Approach to Reduce Community Harms   January 18, 2023   Webinar Overview and Objectives In collaboration with the Southeast PTTC, Center for Advancing Alcohol Science to Practice, and the US Alcohol Policy Alliance, interactive webinar #1 will detail the benefits of working on evidence-based, population-level strategies to make the largest impact on community-level harms associated with alcohol. Presenters will discuss the science that guides effective strategies and how the science relates to communities working on alcohol-related issues. In this webinar, participants will explore: The data associated with harms from excessive drinking and underage drinking in the US How local conditions affect alcohol-related harms at the community level The power of evidence-based, population-level strategies to address the community harms associated with excessive and underage drinking   Learning Session Materials Recording for Webinar 1: The Why - Alcohol Policy: A Community Approach to Reduce Community Harms Slide Deck for Webinar 1: The Why - Alcohol Policy: A Community Approach to Reduce Community Harms (PDF) Local Alcohol Policy Exploration Worksheet   Additional Resources  Center for Advancing Alcohol Science to Practice CADCA's Community Assessment Primer Alcohol Action Network American Public Health Association, Addressing Alcohol-Related Harms: A Population Level Response CDC's Alcohol and Public Health Website and Alcohol Portal A Tale of Two Zip Codes   Recordings for Other Sessions Recording for Webinar 2: The What - Evidence-Based Alcohol Policies to Reduce Community Level Harms Recording for Webinar 3: The How - A  Proven and Practical Model to Guide the Development of Local Alcohol Policies   Presenters: Michael Sparks is an Alcohol Policy Specialist and President of Sparks Initiatives. His primary interest is in assisting communities to implement evidence-based environmental strategies to reduce alcohol and other drug problems. Among others, Michael is currently working with Wake Forest University, St. Joseph’s Healthcare Foundation and Health Foundation of South Florida on a range of public health issues. He currently serves as the Co-Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of the US Alcohol Policy Alliance.       Sara Cooley Broschart leads the newly established Center for Advancing Alcohol Science to Practice. Sara is a public health leader with over a decade of experience in substance use prevention at local, regional and state levels. Contribution to community has been a driving value, and she is thrilled to work with communities nationwide in her new role. Her experience includes advising alcohol and marijuana regulators on policy and best practices, developing innovative methods to engage community voices in policy making activities, building a statewide alcohol policy alliance from the ground up, and establishing a health network in rural Nicaragua. Sara has done extensive graduate work in Cultural Anthropology and Public Health at the University of Michigan and holds a BA in Biology and Anthropology from the University of Virginia.     Liz Parsons joined the Center as Associate Director this spring. She has worked in the youth and community health field for 20 years, specializing in youth substance use prevention for the last 14 years. She has led local youth substance use prevention initiatives in several communities in Massachusetts and was a leader in the public health response to Massachusetts’ review of alcohol laws. Liz has presented about local and state alcohol policy implementation at local and national forums. She especially enjoys supporting public health professionals in their efforts to increase awareness and knowledge about impactful alcohol policies and connecting alcohol policy research with practitioner efforts in communities. Liz has a master of education from the University of Bristol, UK.        Snigdha Peddireddy is a Fellow currently supporting the Training and Technical Assistance Center and Alcohol Action Network. She is an early-career alcohol and other drug policy researcher with expertise in policy evaluation and statistical modeling methods. Broadly, Snigdha studies the impacts of structural determinants on inequities in substance use-related harms. She is a current PhD student at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health. Snigdha also holds an MPH in Health Behavior from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a BS in Neuroscience from Duke University.     Izabelle Wensley is the joint Project Coordinator for the Center for Advancing Alcohol Science to Practice and the U.S. Alcohol Policy Alliance. She is an experienced public health advocate and activist. She started her advocacy career at the age of 13 with Dover Youth to Youth, a non-profit program that specializes in drug and alcohol prevention through youth empowerment. She has conducted trainings in over a dozen states, engaging youth across the country. Her desire to make a difference through advocacy led her to pursue higher education in public health. Izabelle graduated from Johnson & Wales University in 2022 with a B.S. in Public Health where she helped establish the Undergraduate Research Center. Izabelle looks forward to continuing to develop her knowledge and skills in the alcohol prevention field.     Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: January 31, 2023
Multimedia
  What is Prevention? January 26, 2023   This recorded presentation, developed with the brand-new prevention professional in mind, will help orient viewers within the field of primary substance misuse prevention. Viewers will gain basic insight into primary prevention concepts such as risk and protective factors, evidence-based interventions, the Strategic Prevention Framework, and the coalition model. By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: Define primary prevention Explain the importance of using a data-informed planning process Identify who does prevention work within a community   Presentation Materials Recording for What is Prevention Slide Deck for What is Prevention (PDF)   Audience: Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level substance misuse prevention practitioners and allied health partners located in the Pacific Southwest region, including American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of Marshall Islands, and Republic of Palau.   Presenter:   Britany Wiele, CPS, is a Project Coordinator, Workforce Development at the Center for the Application of Substance Abuse technologies (CASAT) at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). In her role at CASAT, Britany serves as a Training and Technical Assistant Specialist for SAMHSA’s Pacific Southwest Prevention Technology Transfer Center which aims to expand the capacity of the substance misuse prevention workforce. She is a Certified Prevention Specialist with experience working with community coalitions in all areas of the Strategic Prevention Framework. Prior to joining CASAT, she worked for Join Together Northern Nevada providing leadership in developing effective community-wide youth and adult programming, implementing evidence-based programs, and building community partnerships. Britany has a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art History from the University of California, Riverside.   Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.    
Published: January 26, 2023
Multimedia
Health Equity Foundations for the African American Population November 29, 2022   Learning Session Overview and Objectives In this learning session, we will define terms that are essential to the discussion around health equity as well as the roots of how inequities were formed in African American communities.  We will also journey into the African American population and the impact of disparities, before ending in what roles we can play in prevention to help create equity. This Learning Session will be formatted as a 45-minute presentation followed by a 45-minute facilitator-led discussion. By the end of this learning session, participants will be able to: Discover how health disparities and other inequities play a role in behavioral health and substance use/misuse of the African American Population Define terminology linked to the discussion of health equity Describe the role of cultural competence and cultural humility   Presenter: Albert Gay, M.S. Chief of Development for TTJ Group & SheRay’s & Associates LLC,  Albert Gay was born and raised in Gary, Indiana.  He was ordained into the ministry in 1994 and since that time he has worked with youth and communities in many capacities.  Albert has been in full-time ministry as a youth pastor, where he counseled urban youth in positive directions and provided them with alternative solutions to the “streets.” Albert expanded into the Prevention field in 1997 when he was employed by the Boys & Girls Clubs of Northwest Indiana as a Prevention Coordinator.  He received credentials as a Certified Prevention Professional from the Indiana Association of Prevention Professionals in 1999.  While attending ministry school in Florida, Albert worked as a Behavioral Specialist with troubled youth. Albert Gay is currently a Master Trainer for TTJ Group, LLC providing services to non-profit, faith-based, and community organizations and governmental entities in developing and implementing technical assistance and training services in an innovative and practical format. Albert Gay obtained his B.A. in English Arts from the historically distinguished, Hampton University in Virginia, and he obtained his Master of Science in Management from Oakland City     Learning Session Materials   Recording for The Health Equity Foundations for the African American Population Slide Deck for Health Equity Foundations for the African American Population (PDF)   Additional Resources  National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS) in Health and Health Care from the US Dept. of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health California Health Care Almanac: Health Disparities by Race and Ethnicity in California: Pattern of Inequity About Social Determinants of Health: What are social determinants of health? by The Center for Disease Control and Prevention Two Americas: Phoenix's redlining legacy, YouTube Video   Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: December 20, 2022
Multimedia
The Intersection of Prevention and Recovery: Making the Connection September 7, 2022   Webinar Overview and Objectives There is frequent discussion in the field of behavioral health of the existence and problems associated with the siloing of services and its negative impact. This webinar will explore the many connections between prevention and recovery. Participants will explore opportunities for collaboration and mutual support and benefit. By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to: List common terms used in prevention and recovery Describe the intersection between prevention and recovery approaches Identify specific ways in which prevention and recovery practitioners can better support one another   Presenter: Sandra Puerini Del Sesto, M.Ed, CPSS, is a consultant and master trainer in behavioral health and strategic planning for non-profits and has worked in prevention for over 40 years. In addition, she was the founding director of the Institute for Addiction Recovery at Rhode Island College. Sandra is a member of the advisory boards of the New England Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC), the National Latino PTTC, the PTTC-NCO (National Coordinating Office) and the New England School of Addiction Studies. Sandra serves as the RI delegate to and the former Prevention Committee Co-Chair of the International Certification and Reciprocity Consortium (IC&RC), which certifies professionals working in behavioral health. Sandra is a co-author of the SAMHSA's Substance Abuse Prevention Skills Training (SAPST) and its basic and advanced Ethics in Prevention courses as well as many other face-to-face and online courses in prevention.     Webinar Session Materials Recording for The Intersection of Prevention and Recovery: Making the Connection Slide Deck for The Intersection of Prevention and Recovery: Making the Connection (PDF)   Additional Resources  Words Matter- Terms to Use and Avoid When Talking About Addiction (PDF) Is it Time for Person-first Language in Addiction Treatment? William White and Alisha White (PDF) Recovery Capital (PDF)     Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: September 26, 2022
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