Products and Resources Catalog

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Interactive Resource
Our series explores the vital role that language plays in promoting inclusion and cultural humility in the field of prevention. Each segment delves into specific topics and engage in interactive discussions led by experts in the field. Together, we'll deepen our understanding of the diverse communities we serve and how to create more inclusive prevention strategies. Download a copy of our companion resource from this series: https://heyzine.com/flip-book/665943c...
Published: May 1, 2024
Multimedia
In recognition of SAMHSA's 20th Annual National Prevention Day, the PTTC Network and National Prevention Week have developed this webinar, Finding Power in Prevention Storytelling. This webinar showcases real-world, innovative initiatives in communities across the United States and highlights what motivates “preventioneers” to do such amazing work.
Published: February 15, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The latest edition of our bi-monthly newsletter is available. This month’s edition features our latest product a harm reduction guide for prevention professionals, prevention success videos, resources for awareness campaigns for the month of February, and regionally and nationally developed events and tools to support and grow the prevention workforce in New England. View the newsletter.
Published: February 6, 2024
Toolkit
  Prevention Success Video Series   This video series highlights several initiatives from across New England following evidence-informed prevention practices to develop effective prevention programs. Through interviews, you will see examples of how these prevention practitioners use prevention science to identify and address a need in their communities, and the power of prevention science to create change.    How can you use this resource? This resource is intended to provide real examples of how prevention initiatives are planned and implemented and the impact that effective prevention programs can have. For people who are new to the prevention field, either as staff, volunteers, coalition members, or other community members, these videos can be a tool to demonstrate what prevention is and can do. For those who have been in the prevention field, these videos provide examples to expand the possibilities for how prevention science can be used in different settings to address different types of challenges. DOWNLOAD THE VIDEO SERIES OVERVIEW.   COLLEGE CAMPUS GAMBLING PREVENTION INITIATIVE   Interview with Mallory Schultz, MPH, Prevention and Training Coordinator, Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling    The Connecticut College Campus Gambling Prevention Initiative is a pilot program to provide education and resources for colleges and universities to deliver problem gambling prevention information to the student population. Youth and young adults represent a growing population affected by problem gambling, and this program seeks to empower colleges to address problem gambling along with substance use and mental health. For more information: https://ccpg.org/     INCREDIBLE YEARS Interview with Tamar Dalcé Coles, M.Ed., Incredible Years Grant Coordinator 2021-2023, Rhode Island Regional Coalitions The Incredible Years Series is an evidence-based curriculum to address social-emotional learning for parents, teachers, and children. They are designed to work jointly to promote emotional, social, and academic competence and to prevent, reduce, and treat behavioral and emotional problems in young children. This program has been used as an upstream prevention strategy in two Rhode Island communities, to support parents and teachers of young children and promote healthy development. For more information: https://riprevention.org/upstreamprevention/      LGBTQ+ YOUTH TOBACCO PREVENTION INITIATIVE Interview with Joanne Joy, Senior Program Manager, and April Hughes, Associate Program Manager, Healthy Communities of the Capital Area.  Recognizing a need for more data and information on tobacco use and prevention among LGBTQ+ youth, community partners conducted a needs assessment to learn more about this issue. Using what was learned, HCCA and community partners developed new initiatives to support LGBTQ+ youth and promote prevention which continue to grow and evolve with the needs of the community. For more information: https://hccame.org/lgbtq-youth-support/      About this product: This video series was developed by the New England (HHS Region 1) Prevention Technology Transfer Center in response to highlights several initiatives from across New England following evidence-informed prevention practices within CT, MA, ME, NH, RI and VT about the field of prevention. The New England Prevention Technology Transfer Center program is funded by SAMHSA of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of New England PTTC products are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by SAMHSA/HHS, or the U.S. Government. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by SAMHSA/HHS, or the U.S. Government.   For additional questions about this product, please contact Kristen Erickson [email protected]
Published: January 10, 2024
Toolkit
Session 3 – Equity, Inclusion, & Prevention: A Rural & Appalachian Conversation   A facilitated panel discussion featuring three subject matter experts from our region. This session will provide a focus on understanding the culture of Appalachia and similar rural communities and how that culture informs the lens through which prevention efforts should be focused.   Learning Objectives: Define cultural humility. Identify the difference between cultural humility vs. cultural competence.  Discuss the importance of these topics within the context of current SUD prevention priorities, and prevention leadership.  Discuss potential resources for prevention leaders.   Access the supplemental resources associated with this virtual training opportunity via the download button above.
Published: December 18, 2023
Multimedia
  Is your organization as welcoming and responsive to the LGBTQ+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer) population as it could be? How can we facilitate more affirming and effective prevention services for members of the LGBTQ+ community? In this webinar, we will explore some of the ways we can increase positive outcomes with LGBTQ+ individuals, from outward-facing initial points of contact with our organizations to long-term internal actions toward increased representation and leadership.  We will also hear from a panel of LGBTQ+-identified young adults about their experiences with prevention providers and their thoughts for the field moving forward.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: After the training, participants will be able to: Review their own workplace practices with an eye to where processes could be made more welcoming and affirming Implement workplace practices that have been shown to increase positive behavioral health outcomes for LGBTQ+ individuals Integrate the perspectives of individual LGBTQ+-identified young adults into their prevention work   PRESENTER: Marissa Carlson, MS, CPS Marissa is the Executive Director of the NH Teen Institute, a leadership development nonprofit working with middle & high school students from around NH & New England in a variety of areas including substance misuse prevention, peer mentoring, and creating positive school & community climate.   As part of her role at TI, she oversees and facilitates training for youth participants, youth & adult volunteer program staff, and outside behavioral health and education professionals.  She is a trainer for multiple workshops developed through SAMHSA systems, and is a member of the advisory council of the New England Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC).  In addition, she is the President of the Prevention Certification Board of NH, the NH Prevention delegate to the IC&RC, and serves as the chairperson of the Prevention Specialist credentialing committee.  Outside of her prevention work, Marissa is a founding member of Mill City Productions, a theatre company in Western Massachusetts.  She graduated from Pomona College with a BA in Psychology, received an MS in Nonprofit Management from Bay Path University, and has been a Certified Prevention Specialist since 2011.    
Published: November 2, 2023
Toolkit
Session 2 – Cultural Intersections: LGBTQ Youth and Substance Use Disorder   Many minority populations are disproportionately affected by substance use disorders and the LGBTQ community is no different. We used data to take a look at how LGBTQ youth and young adults are affected by substance use disorder and reviewed some strategies to combat this issue. Attendees also learned new ways to engage LGBTQ youth and young adults in their work!   Learning Objectives: Better understand why LGBTQ youth are disproportionately affected by substance use disorders.  Learn some new ways that we are trying to reach LGBTQ youth to engage them in prevention and harm reduction related to substance use disorders!  Understand the difference between gender identity, gender expression, sexual identity, and sex assigned at birth and how they are all very separate and important concepts.  Identify three ways that you can show community members, that you may interact with, that you are supportive of diversity – without saying it.   Access the supplemental resources associated with this virtual training opportunity via the download button above.
Published: August 20, 2023
Multimedia
LGBTQ Affirming Prevention Messaging: Safety, Engagement, Retention, Strategies Randall Leonard, LCSW-C August 16, 2023, 1:00pm-3:00pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION LGBTQ people, particularly youth, gender diverse folks, and individuals of color, are often labeled both “high-risk” and “hard to reach” populations. Taking the time to understand the medical mistrust dynamics within the community is essential to an embracing welcome. Often, what makes the difference in reaching out to LGBTQ communities with prevention messages is a well-considered, community-designed, targeted campaign featuring high-impact images and culturally-responsive text. This webinar will describe some of the threats that LGBTQ community members may be concerned about in treatment, discuss impactful ways to communicate safety and respect, and give practical examples of prevention messages that have been effective with these populations. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Describe common experiences of safety and threat for LGBTQ people accessing services. Define signals and dynamics in agency messaging that may impact engagement and retention with LGBTQ clients. Identify at least 3 evidence-based outreach strategies that can be effective with LGBTQ community members PRESENTERS Randall Leonard, LCSW-C, is a licensed clinical social worker who has specialized in the care of LGBTQ individuals for four years. They currently serve as a Staff Therapist at the Center for LGBTQ Health Equity, a Center of Excellence of Chase Brexton Health Care, providing individual therapy as well as assessments for gender-affirming surgery. They also facilitate “Identity Talk”, a group for trans and gender-diverse people of color to process intersectionality between culture and gender. Before joining the Chase Brexton team, Randall served survivors of intimate partner violence at Family and Children’s Services, where they provided individual therapy and a weekly support group. In addition, they worked as a Behavioral Specialist in the Emergency Department of Union Memorial Hospital. They started their social work career working with people with severe and persistent mental illness at Sheppard Pratt Health Systems. Randall holds a Master of Social Work from the University of Maryland School of Social Work with a concentration in clinical behavioral health.  
Published: August 16, 2023
Print Media
The Central East PTTC is proud to share this resource for prevention professionals to better serve the LGBTQ community. This handout was created in partnership with our partner, the Center for LGBTQ Health Equity at Chase Brexton. Please download and share this resource.
Published: August 16, 2023
Multimedia
LGBTQ Youth and Substance Use Disorder Kate Bishop, MSSA July 26, 2023, 1:00pm-3:00pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION It’s been a tough year for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) youth, as access to gender affirming health care, youth sports, and drag performances are vilified and outlawed in one state after another. Far from value-neutral, overhearing this political discourse too often leads to life-threatening shame, despair, and self-harm thoughts and feelings for young people just coming into their LGBTQ identity. As in many communities that experience discrimination, LGBTQ young people may overuse substances to cope with a hostile environment that insults their humanity. Though youth are especially vulnerable, LGBTQ people across the lifespan are at markedly higher risk for mental health challenges and harmful substance use than the public. Evidence has shown that identity-targeted interventions can be effective in supporting wellness within these communities. This webinar will describe these disparities, explore what makes young LGBTQ populations particularly vulnerable, provide suggestions about how best to support a young queer, trans, or nonbinary individual in crisis, and consider Sexual and Gender Minority (SGM)-targeted prevention frameworks and strategies. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Define the impact of social determinants of health, including prejudice and discrimination, family rejection, trauma, and stress-related illness, on the substance use behaviors of Sexual and Gender Minority (SGM) youth populations, highlighting how current policy conversations and conditions are affecting the population. Describe LGBTQ sub-cultural norms, attitudes, myths, and messages around substance use and misuse. Identify community-targeted intervention strategies to support SGM youth struggling with substance use disorder. PRESENTERS Kate Bishop, MSSA, Education Coordinator at the LGBT Health Resource Center of Chase Brexton, is a seasoned professional development trainer with expertise in working with LGBTQ populations, sexual and reproductive health care, adolescent development, intimate partner violence, and sexual trauma. She is certified as a trainer through GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network) as well as SAGE (Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders). Before joining the Chase Brexton team, she developed the capacity building program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s STAR TRACK Adolescent HIV program, providing cultural responsiveness trainings for agencies that serve sexual minority youth of color. Ms. Bishop holds a Bachelor of Arts in Gender Studies from Hiram College and a Masters in Social Work from Case Western Reserve University.  
Published: July 26, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
In this Issue:   The Times, They are a-Changin!: The Updated SPF Application for Prevention Success Training (SAPST) Taking a SAPST course Epi Corner: Understanding and Addressing the Needs of LGBTQ+ Youth Additional Resources for LGBTQ+ Youth What's Happening Around the Region?
Published: July 21, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The June 2023 issue honors National Pride Month, National PTSD Awareness Month, and Men's Health Month by sharing events and resources on these topics. As always, you will find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!    
Published: June 5, 2023
Multimedia
Liberation Approaches in LGBTQ Behavioral Health and The Crossroads of Racial and Sexual/Gender Identity Randall Leonard, LCSW-C, and Kate Bishop, MSSA April 5, 2023, 1:00pm-3:00pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION A Liberation-focused practice seeks to meet marginalized people where they are, within their cultural, historical, and community contexts, and to support clients in healing from the impacts of white supremacy, homophobia, gender binary rigidity, and other systems of dominance and oppression. We know that substance over-use is a common tool used by marginalized community members to find relief from the continual soul-scraping of living with degrading experiences, microaggressions, exploitation, intergenerational trauma, and colonial legacies. Effective liberation prevention and treatment approaches are those that pull back from individual choices and focus on the underlying systems that create intolerable conditions for living. These frameworks engage structural and institutional analysis, including a critical look at the ways behavioral health care systems may act as a tool to reinforce systemic inequity, and offer community-nested, strengths-based, empowerment-focused healing approaches. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Locate substance use as an adaptive tool for managing minority stress. Apply a liberation framework to creative outreach strategies and prevention messaging. Examine the role of behavioral health providers and systems in maintaining oppressive care structures and apply new models to substance use treatment. Develop a liberation framework analysis of current treatment options available to BIPOC LGBTQ people. PRESENTERS Randall Leonard, LCSW-C, is a licensed clinical social worker who has specialized in the care of LGBTQ individuals for four years. They currently serve as a Staff Therapist at the Center for LGBTQ Health Equity, a Center of Excellence of Chase Brexton Health Care, providing individual therapy as well as assessments for gender-affirming surgery. They also facilitate “Identity Talk”, a group for trans and gender-diverse people of color to process intersectionality between culture and gender. Before joining the Chase Brexton team, Randall served survivors of intimate partner violence at Family and Children’s Services, where they provided individual therapy and a weekly support group. In addition, they worked as a Behavioral Specialist in the Emergency Department of Union Memorial Hospital. They started their social work career working with people with severe and persistent mental illness at Sheppard Pratt Health Systems. Randall holds a Master of Social Work from the University of Maryland School of Social Work with a concentration in clinical behavioral health. Kate Bishop, MSSA, Education Coordinator at the LGBT Health Resource Center of Chase Brexton, is a seasoned professional development trainer with expertise in working with LGBTQ populations, sexual and reproductive health care, adolescent development, intimate partner violence, and sexual trauma. She is certified as a trainer through GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network) as well as SAGE (Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders). Before joining the Chase Brexton team, she developed the capacity building program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s STAR TRACK Adolescent HIV program, providing cultural responsiveness trainings for agencies that serve sexual minority youth of color. Ms. Bishop holds a Bachelor of Arts in Gender Studies from Hiram College and a Masters in Social Work from Case Western Reserve University.  
Published: April 5, 2023
Print Media
The International Transgender Day of Visibility is an annual observance designed to celebrate accomplishments of transgender and gender non-conforming people while also acknowledging the work that still needs to be done to achieve trans justice. Trans and non-binary individuals are facing significant political attacks in legislation as well as fatal violence, especially against Black and trans women of color. We also acknowledge that, prior to European colonization, Indigenous cultures often were uplifting of Two-Spirit people and viewed them as sacred. We aim to dismantle colonial views of gender. Today and every day, we celebrate trans and non-binary people and stand firm against disinformation, discrimination, and hate impacting the community.   Download the flyer to learn how you can support Trans and Gender Nonconforming people.
Published: March 27, 2023
Multimedia
Webinar: Working to Promote Protection by Supporting LGBTQ+ Teens in Foster Care December 8, 2022   Webinar Description Youth in foster care face unique risk and protective factors related to substance misuse. LGTBQ+ youth in foster care need explicit support and acceptance; however, few caseworkers and caregivers receive specialized training. To address this, the Connecting: Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Expression (SOGIE) eLearning was developed. During this webinar, participants will learn about the importance of gender-affirming care for adolescence. They will also learn about the free online resource for caregivers and social workers offered by the State of Washington Alliance for Child Welfare Excellence.   Webinar Recording and Slides Working to Promote Protection by Supporting LGBTQ+ Teens in Foster Care Recording Working to Promote Protection by Supporting LGBTQ+ Teens in Foster Care Slides (PDF)   Additional Resources Connecting: Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity & Expression (SOGIE): A Guide for Foster Families Connecting: Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity and Expression Training for Caregivers and Kinship Providers (eLearning) by The Alliance for Professional Development Training, and Caregiver Excellence:   Presenters Susan Barkan, PhD, Director of Research, Partners for our Children. Dr. Barkan is a Principal Research Scientist and Director of Research at Partners for Our Children. Her work involves developing and evaluating programs and policies to improve the lives of children and families in the child welfare system. Susan is the principal investigator of Strive, a curriculum-based program designed to facilitate quality visits between parents and their children in foster care. She is a co-investigator of Connecting, a program for teens and their foster or relative caregivers aimed at preventing teens’ initiation of risky behaviors. Connecting has also developed a new module addressing the unique needs of LGBTQ2S teens in foster care. The module is available in the Alliance for Child Welfare Excellence training catalogue for caregivers. Throughout Susan’s career, she has focused on the social determinants of health and the elimination of inequities in health and wellness. She served on the Washington State Racial Disproportionality Advisory Committee until the committee ended in 2018. Susan earned a Ph.D. in epidemiology from Yale University and a B.A. in psychology and biology from Antioch College. She completed a National Institute of Mental Health-funded postdoctoral fellowship in Family Violence at The Children's Hospital in Boston, MA, where she also held a faculty appointment in pediatrics at Harvard Medical School. She holds affiliate faculty appointments within the University of Washington Schools of Public Health and Social Work. Kym Ahrens MD, MPH, University of Washington Department of Pediatrics. Dr. Ahrens is an Associate Professor of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine at Seattle Children's Hospital and the University of Washington School of Medicine. She also serves as Medical Director for the Washington State Department of Children, Youth, and Families Juvenile Rehabilitation System (DCYF JR. She conducts research to identify needs and improve outcomes for youth exposed to early adversity including systems-involved and gender-diverse youth.  Kevin P. Haggerty, M.S.W., Ph.D Dr. Haggerty is a professor emeritus at the University of Washington School of Social Work. He is the former director of the Social Development Research Group where he specialized in the delivery of prevention programs at the community, school and family level. For over three decades, he has focused on developing innovative ways to organize the scientific knowledge base for prevention so that parents, communities and schools can better identify, assess, and prioritize customized approaches that meet their needs. He has served as principal investigator on a variety of intervention-focused federally funded grants. An expert on substance abuse and delinquency prevention, Dr. Haggerty speaks, conducts trainings, and writes extensively on this field. He is a former board member and Fellow of the Society for Prevention Research and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare and is a prevention science reviewer for periodicals such as Prevention Science.   Questions? Contact Clarissa Lam Yuen ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: January 20, 2023
Multimedia
Substance Use and HIV Part 2: Recommendations for Prevention Professionals Josh Esrick, MPP, and Princess Walker, MPHc July 26, 2022, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will provide recommendations to prevention professionals interested in providing HIV-related services. This includes dual-focused substance use and HIV prevention programming, substance use prevention services for people living with or at risk for HIV, and HIV prevention services for people with or at risk for substance use. The webinar will provide examples of evidence-based and promising programs and discuss the importance of developing public health partnerships to implement them. It will review opportunities to improve services for populations disproportionately impacted by HIV, such as LGBTQ, BIPOC, and Hispanic communities, and share examples of successful practices. The webinar will also provide key recommendations for developing new pilot programs and ensuring to incorporate cultural competency and humility. Lastly, it will provide an opportunity for webinar participants to take part in small breakout group discussion of these topics. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Review evidence-based and promising programs for HIV and substance use prevention Summarize opportunities to improve services and to develop public health collaborative partnerships Discuss recommendations for developing new pilot programs Provide small group discussion and shared learning opportunity PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing training and technical assistance to numerous organizations at the Federal, state, and local levels. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Princess Walker, MPHc, graduated with a dual degree in Psychology and Health Administration and Policy Program with a concentration in Public Health from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She is a results-oriented public health professional passionate about community health education, inequality, public health research, and eliminating health disparities. Specifically, she serves underprivileged communities to address health disparities in high-risk groups. She has worked extensively at both the community and state levels developing strategic prevention/behavioral healthcare plans and enforcing policies. Princess is proficient in qualitative and quantitative research and analysis, program/project management, and public health issues. Recognized for orchestrating work processes and instilling trust and confidence in stakeholders in education, private entities, government organizations, and participants that support public health objectives—currently advancing her degree as an MPH candidate with a concentration in Epidemiology. She hopes to advance community-level monitoring and evidence-based interventions and training to improve health outcomes produced by Substance used disorder and other communicable diseases.
Published: July 26, 2022
Multimedia
Substance Use and HIV Part 1: Understanding the Connections and Scope of the Problem Josh Esrick, MPP, and Princess Walker, MPHc July 19, 2022, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will review the connections between substance use and HIV. It will summarize the research on how substance use can increase the risk of contracting HIV and present the most recent data on co-occurring prevalence rates. The webinar will examine the disproportionate impact of HIV among LGBTQ, BIPOC, Hispanic, and other disadvantaged populations nationwide and in the Central East region. It will discuss the importance of including HIV prevention programming in substance use prevention services, as well as of providing substance use prevention services to people living with HIV. Additionally, the webinar will introduce key considerations for serving this population, such as the importance of cultural competency and humility. Lastly, it will provide an opportunity for webinar participants to take part in small breakout group discussion of these topics. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Discuss the importance of addressing substance use and HIV together Review the disproportionate impact of HIV Explain key considerations for serving people living with HIV Provide small group discussion and shared learning opportunity PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing training and technical assistance to numerous organizations at the Federal, state, and local levels. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Princess Walker, MPHc, graduated with a dual degree in Psychology and Health Administration and Policy Program with a concentration in Public Health from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. She is a results-oriented public health professional passionate about community health education, inequality, public health research, and eliminating health disparities. Specifically, she serves underprivileged communities to address health disparities in high-risk groups. She has worked extensively at both the community and state levels developing strategic prevention/behavioral healthcare plans and enforcing policies. Princess is proficient in qualitative and quantitative research and analysis, program/project management, and public health issues. Recognized for orchestrating work processes and instilling trust and confidence in stakeholders in education, private entities, government organizations, and participants that support public health objectives—currently advancing her degree as an MPH candidate with a concentration in Epidemiology. She hopes to advance community-level monitoring and evidence-based interventions and training to improve health outcomes produced by Substance used disorder and other communicable diseases.
Published: July 19, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The latest edition of our bi-monthly newsletter is available. This month’s edition features growing prevention careers together, a focus on cannabis prevention, stories of substance misuse prevention and resilience, the application is open for the next Project ECHO, awareness campaigns for the month of June, and regionally and nationally developed events and tools to support and grow the prevention workforce in New England. View the newsletter.
Published: June 13, 2022
Multimedia
The National Hispanic and Latino PTTC is happy to share with you this resource from the Center of Excellence on LGBTQ+ Behavioral Health Equity (CoE LGBTQ+ BHE). Our center supported the CoE LGBTQ+ BHE and we are proud to share these resources are now available in Spanish and Portuguese. This animated video, reviews basic terminology that is important to know when working with people who have diverse sexual orientations or gender identities. This terminology includes sex assigned at birth, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, and more.   English   Spanish   Portuguese     This glossary of terms related to sexual orientation, gender identity, and expression (SOGIE) is a resource for behavioral health practitioners to better understand language commonly used in LGBTQ+ communities. It should be noted that people use terms in different ways, and the best practice is always to honor language an individual uses to identify themselves. English: Spanish: Portuguese: We invite you to visit the CoE LGBTQ+ BHE webpage to learn more: https://lgbtqequity.org/resources/ 
Published: June 1, 2022
Multimedia
Recording: Creating Inclusive Prevention Organizations and Coalitions   Prevention programs and coalitions that strive for inclusivity will reap the greatest benefits from its diversity. Topics covered in this skill building presentation include: a definition of key terms: monocultural, compliance and inclusive prevention programs and coalitions; three sign of an inclusive prevention program or coalition; 7 steps for developing an inclusive prevention program or coalition; crucial conversations; how to deal with microaggressions and how to become an inclusivity change agent.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of this presentation, you will be able to: Articulate the differences between a monocultural, compliance and inclusive prevention program and coalition. Utilize 7 steps for developing an inclusive prevention program and coalition. Address microaggressions which can negatively impact trust and coalition building. Begin the process of creating an inclusivity committee which can help move your inclusivity initiative forward. Function as an inclusivity change agent.   PRESENTER: Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC Mark Sanders is the State Project Manager for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC and PTTC. Mark has worked for 40 years as a social worker, educator, and part of the SUD workforce. He is founder of the Online Museum of African American Addictions, Treatment and Recovery and co-founder of Serenity Academy of Chicago, the only recovery-oriented high school in Illinois. Mark is also an international speaker, trainer, and consultant in the behavioral health field whose work has reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, the Caribbean, and the British Islands.   The Great Lakes PTTC offered this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.  
Published: May 12, 2022
Multimedia
Bisexual Women and Substance Misuse Kate Bishop, MSSA April 27, 2022, 1:00pm-3:00pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION Though LGBTQ people in general report higher rates of substance use, bisexual women are particularly vulnerable to substance use disorders. Studies have consistently shown bisexual women at the highest risk among sexual and gender minority groups, including significantly higher rates of alcohol, tobacco, marijuana, opioid misuse and binge drinking than lesbians or heterosexual women. Studies have looked at the constellation of pressures that may contribute to this alarming disparity, including higher rates of sexual trauma, poverty, and discrimination coming from both heterosexual and LGBTQ communities. This webinar will describe the scope of bisexual women's substance use, what factors may contribute to drug and alcohol dependence, and ways prevention workers can support bisexual women who are dealing with chaotic substance misuse in their lives. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Describe the scope of substance use among bisexual women. Explore the unique challenges many bisexual women face which may contribute to elevated rates of substance use disorders within the population. Identify intervention strategies to support bisexual women who wish to address chaotic substance use in their lives. PRESENTERS Kate Bishop, MSSA, the Education Coordinator at the LGBT Health Resource Center of Chase Brexton, is a seasoned professional development trainer with expertise in working with LGBTQ populations, sexual and reproductive health care, adolescent development, intimate partner violence, and sexual trauma. She is certified as a trainer through GLSEN (Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network) as well as SAGE (Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders). Before joining the Chase Brexton team, she developed the capacity building program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s STAR TRACK Adolescent HIV program, providing cultural responsiveness trainings for agencies that serve sexual minority youth of color. Ms. Bishop holds a Bachelor of Arts in Gender Studies from Hiram College and a Masters in Social Work from Case Western Reserve University.  
Published: April 27, 2022
Website
        What LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC want Prevention Professionals to Know? The Central East PTTC, Central East ATTC, National American Indian & Alaska Natives PTTC, and the National Hispanic and Latino PTTC joined efforts to proudly present a 4-part virtual learning series titled ‘What LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC want Prevention Professionals to Know?’ In case you missed these events, and you would like to access the sessions, please see below: Understanding the historical information behind the challenges and the risk factors of the LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC (Part 1) Enhancing the protective factors for the LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC (Part 2) Moving the needle: How to improve the current behavioral health system to increase engagement and retention of LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC? (Part 3) How can we transform this information into actionable and practical steps to enhance service delivery to the LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC and make a difference? (Part 4)   During each session, panelists shared their experiences as subject matter experts and/or lived experiences. The sessions were very well received by the participants. Our community asked us to provide additional resources around LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC populations. As a result of this request, our team put together an extensive list of articles, trainings, websites, materials and you can access the information and share it with your family, friends and colleagues. Please click each image to view the corresponding resources. Click Images Below To View Resources                  Disclaimer The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by SAMHSA/HHS, or the U.S. Government, the Central East ATTC and PTTC, The Danya Institute, the National American Indian and Alaska Native PTTC, the National Hispanic and Latino Prevention Technology Transfer Center or National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA). Funding for this learning series was made possible by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). 1H79SP081018 HHS Region 3 Central East PTTC: The Danya Institute, 1H79TI080210 HHS Region 3 Central East ATTC The Danya Institute, 1U79SP023012 National Hispanic and Latino PTTC: The National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA), 5H79SP081032 National American Indian and Alaska Native PTTC. The views expressed in written conference materials or publications and by speakers and moderators do not necessarily reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does the mention of trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the by the U.S. Government, The Central East ATTC and PTTC, The Danya Institute, the National American Indian and Alaska Native PTTC, the National Hispanic and Latino Prevention Technology Transfer Center or The National Latino Behavioral Health Association (NLBHA).  
Published: April 1, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The June 2022 issue features content related to Pride Month and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Awareness Month, the Counselor's Corner blog, the Checking In Podcast: Understanding PTSD in First Responders, and a complete calendar of events.
Published: April 1, 2022
eNewsletter or Blog
In this Issue:   Celebrate Love. Celebrate Joy.   Epi Corner: The Evolving Opioid Epidemic: Fentanyl, Fentanyl Analogues, and Other Drugs   What LGBTQIA2S+ BIPOC Want Prevention Professionals to Know, A Four-Part Learning Series   What's Happening Around the Region?  PTTC Spotlights A New Product From the PTTC Healtheknowledge Online Course
Published: March 18, 2022
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