Products and Resources Catalog

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Product Type
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Language
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Toolkit
A “syndemic” refers to two or more co-occurring epidemics that have shared causes and compounding negative effects. Addressing syndemics can help advance health equity and reduce the scope and impact of negative health conditions. This product explains what syndemics are, provides examples of syndemics that involve substance use, introduces the syndemic framework to prevention, and provides tips for addressing syndemics.
Published: May 20, 2024
Interactive Resource
  Working in rural communities can be as rewarding as it is challenging. Isolation and a lack of connectedness is an issue in all parts of rural life, prevention work is no exception. Prevention professionals working in small towns, rural communities, and frontier areas often feel isolated from others in the profession and can be misunderstood by funders and program developers. Finding connection and support can be the key to helping move prevention forward in rural communities.   In this webinar we will discuss the unique benefits and barriers of working in rural communities. We will explore ways to make connections and share knowledge with prevention professionals working in similar settings. Our speakers will share their experience with The Rural Network in Washington state. The network brings together rural prevention providers to help share ideas, discuss challenges, and affirm and support each other’s work.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of this course, participants will be able to: Understand challenges facing rural prevention providers, and ways to overcome those challenges. Access to an online Rural Prevention Toolkit, containing 4 categories of tools for success in rural communities. Discuss ways to increase connections and networks.   PRESENTERS:  Isaac Wulff is a lifelong resident of and advocate for rural communities, who came to prevention work by way of leaving a career in construction to teach high school science. After working in an alternative school teaching teenage moms and dads from 14 different small school districts, he became fascinated by the dual nature of growing up in small towns with all their strengths and challenges. First drawn into student support and then prevention coalition work, he ended up working at the Washington State Health Care Authority as a prevention manager helping 10 coalitions and serving as one of the founding members of the Rural Prevention Network. Sarah Meyers is the Coalition Director for the Pomeroy Partners for Healthy Families coalition in Garfield County, Washington -- the least densely populated county in Washington State with a county-wide population of 2,800. Sarah found her niche in prevention after leaving her hometown of Pomeroy and getting a bachelor’s degree in psychology and found herself back in her hometown (very much against her will!). Sarah became the coordinator of a brand-new, state-funded coalition in 2014 and became the director in 2021 after receiving a Drug Free Communities grant. Sarah is also the Testing Chair and board member of the Prevention Specialist Certification Board of Washington and serves on the Steering Committee for the Washington State Rural Network. Sarah has worked in rural prevention for 9 years and is passionate about serving our rural communities in a way that is culturally competent to each community’s needs.   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: May 14, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The May 2024 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: From Stigma to Support: SUD and Mental Health Needs in AAPI Populations Mental Health: New Video Examines Coordinated Specialty Care for Early Psychosis Prevention: Empowering Communities: National Prevention Week Opioid Response: Observing and Celebrating Pride Month Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, Region 3 news, and new resources. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.
Published: May 7, 2024
Multimedia
Webinar Description The association between chronic exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and poor behavioral health outcomes across the lifespan is well-established, but ACEs are preventable. This webinar will explore the evidence supporting upstream strategies that can prevent ACEs from happening in the first place as well as positive childhood experiences (PCEs) that can mitigate the harms of ACEs. Recent data sources that can be used to monitor ACEs and PCEs at the state-level to guide prevention and evaluation activities will also be explored.   Webinar Objectives By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to: Explain the influence of ACEs and PCEs on risk behaviors using a lifecourse perspective; Describe primary prevention strategies that can prevent ACEs; Describe how PCEs can buffer the impact of ACEs on behavioral health outcomes; Identify state-level data sources that can be used to monitor ACEs and PCEs.   Presenters Amanda Haboush-Deloye earned her Ph.D. in experimental psychology and her Master of Arts in clinical psychology from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Amanda's research background is on mental health in adolescent, adult, and older adult populations. She also has a particular interest in improving research methods to be more culturally competent. As a researcher at NICRP, she has designed and implemented many research projects regarding children's physical health, mental health, and education, as well as children's advocacy initiatives such as Every Child Matters in Nevada and Prevent Child Abuse Nevada. Being a Las Vegas native, Amanda aims to remain in Nevada and work with NICRP to create a healthy community where families and children are a priority.   Kristin Clements-Nolle received her MPH in Behavioral Sciences and Ph.D in Epidemiology, both from the University of California, Berkeley. Kristen is a nationally recognized adolescent health researcher and has published extensively on the impact of ACE exposure on health outcomes across the lifespan. She also investigates social, community, and family factors that can prevent ACE exposure and/or mitigate the impact on behavioral health outcomes. Kristen is currently a Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Public Health and the principal investigator for a five year grant funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that will focus on preventing ACEs and promoting positive childhood experiences in Nevada.   Post Webinar Materials Preventing ACEs and Their Associated Harms Recording Preventing ACEs and Their Associated Harms Slide Deck   Questions Please email Reagan Hart at ([email protected]) for any questions.
Published: May 2, 2024
Other
More than 13.6 million adults over the age of 50 met the criteria for a substance use disorder in 2022. Yet substance use among this population remains underrecognized and has historically not been a priority population for many prevention professionals. This product explains the scope and causes of substance use among older adults, including the role of the social determinants of health. It also emphasizes the importance of screenings to identify older adults at risk for substance use.
Published: April 29, 2024
Multimedia
Cultural Intersections Across the Continuum of Care Southeast TTC’s Collaborative Virtual Summit   Join the Southeast TTC’s Collaborative Virtual Summit! Are you a professional or practitioner in the field of prevention, treatment, recovery, or mental health services within the southeastern United States? If so, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA) Southeast Technology Transfer Centers (TTCs) invite you to our illuminating event: "Cultural Intersections Across the Continuum of Care." The Technology Transfer Centers (TTC) play a crucial role in developing and fortifying the specialized workforce that provides prevention, treatment and recovery support services for substance use disorder and mental health. The Southeast Addiction Technology Transfer Center (SE ATTC), Mental Health Technology Transfer Center (SE MHTTC), and Prevention Technology Transfer Center (SE PTTC) will lead discussions, share insights, ideas, and best practices within their specialized areas. This regionally relevant summit will focus on the intersection of culture and illuminate the challenges and approaches experienced across the continuum of behavioral health.   Supplemental Resources: Presentation Slides - Cultural Intersections SE TTC Collaboration   Key Themes: Equity Across Borders: Explore how cultural intersections impact prevention, treatment, and recovery efforts in diverse communities across the southeastern United States. Continuum of Care: Examine the continuum of care and the role of equity in prevention, addiction science, and mental health services. Challenges and Opportunities: Engage in thought-provoking discussions on the challenges and opportunities faced in ensuring health equity in substance use prevention and mental health services.   Presenters: CAPT Michael King, PhD, MSW, Regional Director Albert Gay, MS, CPC Lucy Cannon, EdD, LCSW, CCDP-D, MATS Pierluigi Mancini, PhD  
Published: April 24, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
  There is growing concern among prevention specialists and public health officials regarding older adults and substance use, misuse, and increasing substance use disorders. Substance use in older adults is complicated and is often overlooked, especially when individuals are experiencing other aging related health conditions. While the number of older adults experiencing substance use disorders dramatically increased in the last 20 years, prevention services have not been tailored to the needs of older adults. This webinar will highlight the growing problem, approaches to understanding the older adult population in your community, and available strategies. Additionally, we will hear directly from preventionists who are implementing programming with this population.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Describe how to assess the prevention needs of older adults in your community. Identify strategies to prevent substance misuse and promote the health and well-being of older adults. Understand approaches and barriers to engaging older adults in prevention efforts. Develop new partnerships that can work across sectors to engage older adults.   ACCESS OR DOWNLOAD SUPPORTING MATERIALS: Presentation Recording, April 25, 2024 Presentation Slides, April 25, 2024   PRESENTER: Chuck Klevgaard, CSPS  Chuck Klevgaard is a nationally recognized expert in substance misuse prevention, public health, and school-based health. Drawing on his experience in collective impact and prevention-focused partnerships, he builds the capacity of states, tribes, schools, communities, and cities to use evidence-based substance misuse prevention and intervention strategies. He specializes in behavioral health support; training and technical assistance; and evidence-based alcohol, opioid, and substance misuse programs and policies. Nationwide, he provides trainings to prevent opioid overdose, including working with first responders to administer naloxone. As a consultant to Great Lakes Prevention Technology Transfer Center, Klevgaard provides training and technical assistance to substance misuse prevention entities within the Great Lakes region, which includes Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Ohio. Klevgaard, a Certified Senior Prevention Specialist through the Illinois Certification Board, Inc., holds a BSW from Minnesota State University Moorhead.   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.  
Published: April 23, 2024
Multimedia, Presentation Slides
  Dive into the world of generative artificial intelligence (AI) with an engaging 90-minute webinar that demystifies Large Language Models (LLMs) and their practical applications. This webinar will offer a blend of theory and hands-on activities, including article summarization and brainstorming AI-driven intervention strategies for substance misuse prevention scenarios. It promises to enhance your understanding of AI's potential in substance misuse prevention work, while also highlighting the critical issues of misinformation and bias inherent in these technologies.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Experiment with generative AI to discover ideas for daily substance misuse prevention work Explain the basic operation of multiple, publicly accessible generative AI tools Describe types of bias, inequity, and misinformation that can arise through use of LLMs   ACCESS OR DOWNLOAD SUPPORTING MATERIALS Presentation Recording, April 18, 2024 Presentation Slides, April 18, 2024 Activity Handouts: Engaging youth as leaders and partners can improve substance use prevention: a call to action to support youth engagement practice and research A National Strategy for Prevention Substance and Opioid Use Disorders Through Evidence-Based Prevention Programming that Fosters Healthy Outcomes in Our Youth The Role of Law Enforcement Officers/Police in Drug Prevention within Educational Settings - Study Protocol for the Development of a Guiding Document Based on Experts' Opinions   PRESENTER:  Brian Klaas Brian Klaas is the Assistant Director for Technology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for Teaching and Learning. He also has a faculty appointment in the School's R3 Center for Innovation in Science Education. As the architect for online learning technology at the School, he leads a team that designs and delivers custom online courseware to thousands of students around the world each year. He teaches graduate level courses on communications design and data visualization for non-expert audiences as well as applications of generative artificial intelligence in public health. Brian heads the university’s IT Accessibility Training and Education subcommittee and the Hopkins Universal Design for Learning initiative at Johns Hopkins. Brian has presented on techniques for successful online learning delivery and UDL programs at conferences throughout the country, including Educause, OLC, TeachX, UBTech, APHA, TechEd, Syllabus, and CUE.   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: April 15, 2024
Multimedia
Building Bridges: Fostering Community-Campus Collaboration for Substance Use Prevention, Harm Reduction, & Recovery   Join the Southeast PTTC for a lively discussion on the power of collaboration between college campuses and their surrounding communities to support substance misuse prevention, harm reduction and recovery. Our panel of regional experts shared insights, best practices, and success stories, empowering participants with the knowledge needed to implement successful initiatives.   Supplemental Resources: Presentation Slides   Learning Objectives: Understand the significance of collaborative approaches between college campuses and surrounding communities to support prevention, harm reduction, and recovery among youth and young adults. Identify key strategies for building collaborative college campus and community partnerships to address substance use among youth and young adults. Learn about prevention, harm reduction, and recovery initiatives being implemented on college campuses from regional experts. Identify strategies and tools available to implement effective substance misuse prevention, harm reduction, and recovery initiatives within college campuses and surrounding communities.   Presented by: Dr. Lori Ann Eldridge is an assistant professor at East Carolina University, North Carolina. She is a public health implementation scientist specializing in substance use. Her research is dedicated to examining the accessibility of prevention, treatment, and harm reduction services for substance use in rural and underserved communities. Currently, she is the Principal Investigator of Pitt County Coalition on Substance Use Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act Opioid and Stimulant Grant funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. With this work she is bridging partnerships between the local community and East Carolina University campus to prevent youth and young adult substance use and related harms. She has worked with students to expand access to naloxone and other harm reduction strategies at East Carolina University and is a co-faculty mentor for the Team Awareness Combatting Overdose at East Carolina University. Kayce Matthews is the Director of the Coalition for Healthy and Safe Campus Communities (CHASCo) in Tennessee. In this role she oversees the collection of higher education institutions and professionals in Tennessee who are working to address issues of campus health and safety. The work of CHASCO includes providing professional development & networking opportunities, providing assessment tools to campuses, and providing resources and funding for evidence-based prevention programing. Kayce joined CHASCo with over 10 years of experience in prevention and advocacy work. Before joining CHASCo, Kayce worked for the TN Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence. In this role, she founded both the TN Campus Prevention Project and the TN Statewide Sexual Assault Prevention Committee. Previous to the TN Coalition, she served as the Associate Director of the Margaret Cuninggim Women’s Center at Vanderbilt University. She holds a Master of Arts in Counseling from Trevecca University, a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Stephens College, and is a Certified Prevention Specialist. Annette Newton-Baldwin is the Assistant Director of the LION UP Recovery Program (Collegiate Recovery Program) and Intervention. She is a Licensed Professional Counselor as well as a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. She serves the Association of Recovery in Higher Education as the Southeast Region Representative. Currently serves as Project Director for the Louisiana Collegiate Recovery Expansion Grant. Reese Hiatt is an undergraduate student at East Carolina University, North Carolina. She is a marketing major and Co-President of Team Awareness Combatting Overdose. She is dedicated to advocating for those experiencing substance use disorder and making a positive difference in the amount of harm reduction resources available to those in need.  
Published: April 12, 2024
Podcast
Rodney Wambeam, Ph.D. is a Senior Research Scientist at the Wyoming Survey & Analysis Center (WYSAC) of the University of Wyoming (UW). He is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Political Science at UW. Dr. Wambeam completed his Ph.D. at the University of Nebraska in 1999 and served as policy advisor to Nebraska Governor Ben Nelson. He was Director of the Evaluation Research Department at the Nebraska Council to Prevent Alcohol and Drug Abuse before moving home to Wyoming in 2002. At WYSAC, Dr. Wambeam and his team conduct numerous substance abuse prevention and treatment research projects in many states including Arkansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oregon, and Wyoming. He currently leads the Federal Prevention Block Grant, State Opioid Response Grant, and National Opioid Litigation evaluations in Arkansas, as well as leading the Opioid/Fentanyl Needs Assessment and Strategic Plan in Wyoming. He has presented more than 50 keynotes across the country on substance abuse prevention with millennials and on the history of alcohol in America. His book “The Community Needs Assessment Workbook” from Oxford University Press came out in 2015. Email: [email protected] Website: https://wysac.uwyo.edu/wysac/people/rwambeam/ Book: The Community Needs Assessment Workbook
Published: April 4, 2024
Interactive Resource
Access free, self-paced online courses through HealtheKnowledge to enhance your substance misuse prevention knowledge and skills.  Upon finishing these courses, participants receive certificates of completion. Don't have a HealtheKnowledge account? Sign up for free and start browsing substance misuse prevention courses.  
Published: April 3, 2024
Multimedia
  Military-connected youth experience unique challenges that impact their educational and social-emotional learning, putting them at greater risk for substance use and behavioral health challenges. Increasing resiliency by cultivating a culturally competent, supportive environment in schools and communities helps mitigate these challenges. Participants will learn how to enhance existing infrastructure to deliver substance misuse prevention programs to military-connected youth.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Understand the risk factors that make military youth more vulnerable to substance use and behavioral health problems compared to non-military-connected youth. Describe how to increase capacity and readiness to serve military-connected youth. Identify evidence-based practices that support and build resiliency within military-connected youth.   ACCESS OR DOWNLOAD SUPPORTING MATERIALS Presentation Recording, April 11, 2024 Presentation Slides, April 11, 2024   PRESENTER:  Sarah Flowers, CPS Sarah Flowers, CPS, grew up in a military family outside the world’s largest naval base in Virginia Beach, Virginia. As a Gold Star Sibling and military family member, she brings unique perspectives gained from her personal experiences to prevention, empowering individuals, and communities to create and promote healthy environments, lifestyles, and behaviors. She works with state, and national agencies and organizations to develop and coordinate evidence-based strategies to increase resilience within military and veteran families. She specializes in training and consultation on capacity building, community engagement and best practices working with military families.   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: April 2, 2024
Multimedia
  Social media can be a powerful tool in our substance misuse prevention work. The number of digital platforms continues to grow and the way they deliver content is ever-changing. Often, we have limited resources to implement social media plans. Competing priorities, minimal staff time, and an inability to keep up with the technology can make social media planning feel overwhelming. This 90-minute webinar will address ways to navigate these challenges. Join us to learn how to develop and implement manageable and effective social media plans. The session will introduce tools to help broaden reach and enhance engagement.  We will share tips for curating and creating engaging, original content for a variety of platforms. Additionally, we will explore ways to use social media advertising, scheduling, and insights.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Select practical tools, resources, and strategies to create social media content. Identify strategies to increase social media engagement and reach. Integrate social media plans as part of information dissemination, event promotion, and storytelling.   ACCESS OR DOWNLOAD SUPPORTING MATERIALS Presentation Recording, March 28, 2024 Presentation Slides, March 28, 2024 PreventionFIRST! Canva Content Creation handout  PreventionFIRST! Making Content Creation Easier handout PreventionFIRST! Social Media content planning template handout PreventionFIRST! Thought Questions/Social Media Planning Strategies handout   PRESENTER:  Jennifer Bierer, BA Jennifer Bierer is the Director of Communications at PreventionFIRST!  At PreventionFIRST! Jennifer leads social media, public relations, and marketing strategies and coordinates problem gambling prevention strategies. Additionally, she provides training and technical assistance on sustainable, realistic communication strategies for community organizations and prevention professionals. She serves as a board member for the Problem Gambling Network of Ohio. Jennifer is passionate about public health and has extensive health promotion experience in the areas of chronic diseases, obesity, traffic-related deaths/injuries, mental health, and substance use/misuse. She has also developed marketing strategies and branding for several worker-owned businesses. Jennifer has a Bachelor of Arts in communication and public relations from Xavier University and is currently working on her Ohio Certified Prevention Specialist credential. Her life outside of work is filled with houseplants, home improvements, furry friends, human friends, family, and three college-age sons.   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: March 26, 2024
Interactive Resource
This 90-minute webinar will explore national and state level data points from middle and high school youth to make the case that Prevention Works!  We will discuss the need to maintain, expand, and sustain our efforts of implementing tested and effective substance misuse prevention programs. The session will also focus on areas where we have not seen prevention success and a call for action to improve prevention among 18-25-year-old young adults.     LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Explore Monitoring the Future and some state trend data that have demonstrated decreasing overall trends in substance use among high school age youth. Identify three websites that provide information on the tested and effective prevention programs Identify areas of focus for the prevention field that need attention based on state and national data points   ACCESS OR DOWNLOAD SUPPORTING MATERIALS Presentation Recording, March 20, 2024 Presentation Slides, March 20, 2024   PRESENTER Kevin P. Haggerty, MSW, PhD, is an emeritus Professor of Prevention at the University of Washington School of Social Work. He is the former director of the Social Development Research Group where he specialized in the delivery of prevention programs at the community, school and family level. For over three decades, he has focused on developing innovative ways to organize the scientific knowledge base for prevention so that parents, communities and schools can better identify, assess, and prioritize customized approaches that meet their needs. He has served as principal investigator on a variety of intervention-focused federally funded grants.   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: March 19, 2024
Multimedia
Webinar Recording and Follow-Up Materials This presentation focuses on the intersection of adolescent substance use and gun violence in metropolitan, suburban, and rural communities. Along with substance use, 15 additional risk factors for gun violence will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed upon protective factors which help buffer the impact of risk factors. We will also discuss prevention and intervention strategies.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to: Articulate the relationship between substance use and gun violence. Recognize 15 risk factors for adolescent gun violence. Describe how protective factors can help reduce the risk of substance influenced gun violence. Name prevention and intervention strategies that address adolescent gun violence.   ACCESS OR DOWNLOAD SUPPORTING MATERIALS Presentation Recording, March 12, 2024 Presentation Slides, March 12, 2024    PRESENTER:  Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC Mark Sanders, LCSW, CADC, is Illinois state project manager for the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC. He is an international speaker in the behavioral health field whose presentations have reached thousands throughout the United States, Europe, Canada, the Caribbean and British Virgin Islands. A partial list of clients include General Motors Corporation, Xerox Corporation, Northwestern University, and the United States Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines. The author of five books, Mark has had two stories published in The New Times bestselling book series, Chicken Soup for The Soul. He has taught at the University of Chicago, Loyola University of Chicago, and Illinois State University's schools of social work. Mark’s three decades of experience as a direct service Licensed Clinical Social Worker provide the foundation for his presentations.   The Great Lakes A/MH/PTTC is offering this training for individuals working in HHS Region 5: IL, IN, MI, MN, OH, WI. This training is being provided in response to a need identified by Region 5 stakeholders.
Published: March 12, 2024
Other, Toolkit
The Sustainability Planning in Prevention Guidebook and Sustainability Planning in Prevention Toolkit are designed to help substance misuse prevention providers, coalitions, groups, organizations, and training and technical assistance providers to: Look critically at prevention infrastructures Develop sustainability plans Establish the necessary partnerships and resources to sustain meaningful prevention outcomes beyond current funding              The Sustainability Planning Guidebook and accompanying toolkit were originally developed and published by SAMHSA’s Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT) task order in 2018 (Reference # HHSS283201200024I/HHSS28342002T). The 2024 versions of the guidebook and toolkit were developed with the support of the DHHS, SAMHSA, under cooperative agreement H79SP080995.
Published: March 4, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The March 2024 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: Celebrate Women’s Recovery and End Addiction Stigma Mental Health: Health Equity Webinar Series Explores Bipolar Disorder, Autism Prevention: What are Youth Saying About Gambling? Opioid Response: Empowering our Youth: Strategies for SUD Prevention Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, Region 3 news, and new resources. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter. Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox.
Published: March 4, 2024
Multimedia
Dr. Monty Burks Deputy, Director of the Governor's Office of Faith Based and Community Initiatives, where his role is engaging and connecting Tennessee’s faith communities to government and other non-profits with the goal of creating partnerships. In this episode we explore Building Blocks – Faith, Prevention, Recovery and the different intersection points between traditional and non-traditional behavioral health communities. Connect with our guest. Email: [email protected] Web site: www.tn.gov   (search faith based) The funder of this project, along with all other products of the Mid-America PTTC is the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Although funded by SAMHSA, the content of this recording does not necessarily reflect the views of SAMHSA. Since 1993, SAMHSA has actively engaged and supported faith-based and community organizations involved in mental health services and substance use prevention and treatment. Their Community Substance Abuse Prevention Partnership Program includes more than 800 faith-based community partners. To learn more about programs and practices available, including funding opportunities visit: https://www.samhsa.gov/faith-based-community-engagement Faith and community leaders are often the first point of contact when individuals and families face mental health problems or traumatic events. In fact, in times of crisis, many will turn to trusted leaders in their communities before they turn to mental health professionals. Religious and other community organizations can play an important role in supporting individuals living with mental illnesses and encouraging them to seek help. To learn more about the role of Faith and Community leaders in mental health visit:  https://www.samhsa.gov/mental-health/how-to-talk/community-and-faith-leaders
Published: February 15, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The February 2024 issue features content from the Great Lakes ATTC celebrating Black History Month, including our upcoming 2024 Black History Month Panel Presentation. It also features a new educational brief on health equity in crisis systems, upcoming prevention trainings on drug trends in the region, and updates to the Classroom WISE curriculum for 2024. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter, and thank you for reading!
Published: February 12, 2024
Print Media
This brief compares and contrasts the mission, services and audiences of the PTTC Network and SPTAC, and describes how to take advantage of their excellent free prevention resources.
Published: January 10, 2024
Multimedia
The Central East Prevention Technology Transfer Center is excited to announce the 25th episode of our weekly podcast: Walking in Wellness. This series is dedicated to empowering prevention professionals like you with the mindset and skill set necessary to prioritize wellness...every day. This weekly podcast can be accessed via Soundcloud or Spotify. Be sure to follow or subscribe to have episodes delivered weekly!   
Published: January 10, 2024
Multimedia
How can we prevent substance misuse unless we understand what places kids at greater risk of misusing drugs? During this webinar, we will explore the risk factors that place youth at greater risk of substance misuse, as identified by the Social Development Research Group through systematic reviews of the research literature. Time will be spent exploring each risk factor to ensure that preventionists understand the meaning of each factor in order to address them effectively. This training will build on the information shared during the Building Protective Factors Using the Social Development Strategy (Dec. 2023) webinar.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: Describe the importance of focusing on both increasing protective factors and decreasing risk factors List the criteria used to identify factors that place youth at greater risk of substance misuse Understand the nuances that exist for each risk factor Put the risk factor framework into action in their communities   PRESENTATION RESOURCES Printable presentation slides Printable version of the participant workbook  Flipbook version of the participant workbook                   PRESENTER Kris Gabrielsen, MPH, CPS  Kris Gabrielsen is the co-director of the Great Lakes Prevention Technology Transfer Center. She has worked in the substance misuse prevention field for over 30 years. Kris was the Associate Director of the Western Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT), co-authored the first Substance Abuse Prevention Specialist Training curriculum, and co-authored the textbook, Substance Abuse Prevention: The Intersection of Science and Practice. As a consultant, she has worked with states and communities across the nation to bridge the gap between research and practice, assisting prevention professionals in maximizing their effectiveness.    
Published: January 9, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
The January 2024 Dialogue contains articles on: Addiction: COVID-19 Impact on Substance Use Disorder and Recovery | Mental Health: Heart Disease and Mental Health Disparities in Black America | Prevention: Celebrating 20 Years of Prevention Excellence | ORN: ORN Consultant's guidance on Recovery Houses  Additional sections include behavioral health observances, virtual training and webinar events, Region 3 news, and new resources. The Dialogue is designed to inform behavioral and mental health professionals of news and upcoming events in the Central East states. This electronic newsletter is disseminated on the first Tuesday of each month. You are encouraged to provide us with any feedback or submit articles and topics for discussion in future issues of the newsletter.  Sign up to receive the Dialogue in your mailbox. 
Published: January 3, 2024
Multimedia
Dr. Fred Rottnek is a Professor and the Director of Community Medicine at Saint Louis University School of Medicine and the Program Director of the Saint Louis University Addiction Medicine Fellowship. His clinical practices currently include addiction medicine and correctional healthcare. He teaches in the School of Medicine, the Physician Assistant Program, and the School of Law. Board-Certified in Family Medicine and Addiction Medicine, he is the Medical Director for the Assisted Recovery Centers of American (ARCA) and Juvenile Detention in Family Court for the City of St. Louis. He serves on the boards of the Saint Louis Regional Health Commission and Alive and Well Communities.  Email: [email protected] The funder of this project, along with all other products of the Mid-America PTTC is the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Although funded by SAMHSA, the content of this recording does not necessarily reflect the views of SAMHSA. The human brain is the most complex organ in the body. Drugs can alter important brain areas that are necessary for life-sustaining functions and can drive the compulsive drug use that marks addiction. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has a great recourse available titled Drugs, Brains, and Behavior: The Science of Addiction. For more information visit -  https://nida.nih.gov/publications/drugs-brains-behavior-science-addiction/drugs-brain It is reported that only 25% of parents speak with their children about the dangers of drugs. How can we educate parents on the dangers of drugs and alcohol, and provide them with the tools needed to guide and engage children through this very rough and sensitive terrain? Addiction is Real can help answer this simple question – to learn more visit www.addictionisreal.org  We’d like to hear from you, please send your comment, topic or guest suggestion to [email protected]
Published: December 21, 2023
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