Products and Resources Catalog

Center
Product Type
Target Audience
Language
Keywords
Date Range
Multimedia
The Social Determinants of Health and Environmental Strategies (Dec 2022 Series) Part 1: Understanding and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health in Prevention Josh Esrick, MPP, and Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip December 6, 2022, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will introduce and discuss the social determinants of health. It will explain which aspects have been found to be significantly linked to substance use, as well as how the social determinants of health are linked to inequity and health disparities. The webinar will provide recommendations on how prevention professionals can begin thinking about ways to address the social determinants of health and how to pursue a public health approach to prevention. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Understand what the social determinants of health are and how they relate to the socio-ecological model of prevention Identify the social determinants of health linked to increase risk of substance use Consider how racial and ethnic inequities influence substance use risk and services Begin pursuing a public health prevention approach to address the social determinants of health PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing T/TA to numerous organizations. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.  
Published: December 6, 2022
Multimedia
The Collaboration Continuum: Connecting Across Fields to Prevent Suicide and Substance Misuse September 15, 2022   Learning Session Overview and Objectives We all know that collaboration and partnerships are the key to success in prevention efforts, including connections between closely related fields such as suicide and substance misuse prevention. This session will provide an overview of a framework for collaboration, the SPRC Collaboration Continuum, which provides tools and resources for prevention programs to strengthen connections and amplify the impact of their collective efforts. After hearing the story of how a regional coalition has engaged community partners in prevention efforts spanning both suicide and substance misuse prevention fields, participants will have the opportunity to examine their own partnership efforts and identify ways they can strengthen collaboration on the ground. By the end of this learning session, participants will be able to: Describe the SPRC Collaboration Continuum and its four levels of collaboration, as well as how to access related tools to strengthen their own collaboration. List new strategies to overcome common barriers to collaboration in their own prevention efforts. Develop a plan for at least one way they can strengthen their own suicide prevention efforts.   Presenter: Ellyson Stout, MS, State and Community Suicide Prevention Lead at EDC, specializes in public health and suicide prevention with diverse populations. In her role directing EDC’s Suicide Prevention Resource Center (SPRC) contract, she leads a team working to build suicide prevention capacity and infrastructure nationwide at the state, community, health system, and national levels. Stout has over 20 years of experience in public health, cross-sector collaboration, and health communications, including 15 years working with youth suicide prevention efforts in school, clinical, state and community settings. She has served on numerous expert panels and committees, including most recently the advisory group for the Surgeon General’s Call to Action to Implement the National Strategy for Suicide Prevention. Elly presents regularly on suicide prevention around the country, and has co-authored articles published in Journal of Primary Prevention and Journal of Rural Mental Health. Elly holds an M.S. in Health Communications from the Tufts University School of Medicine, and a B.S. in International Relations, Law, and Organization from the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service.     Learning Session Materials Recording for Collaboration Continuum: Connecting Across Fields to Prevent Suicide and Substance Misuse Slide Deck for Collaboration Continuum: Connecting Across Fields to Prevent Suicide and Substance Misuse (PDF)   SPRC Collaboration Continuum SPRC Partnerships & Collaboration SPRC Virtual Learning Lab Community Toolbox section on Multisector Collaboration SAMHSA resource: In Brief: Substance Use and Suicide     Questions? Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: September 23, 2022
Online Course
As the landscape of medicinal and adult personal use of cannabis change across the country, prevention practitioners are left with mixed messages about how to address youth cannabis use. Research is catching up to this changing landscape, and new information about how perception of harm and related factors impact youth cannabis use are emerging. This two-module, 2.5 hour, webinar course will focus on the research behind those factors, as well as evidence-informed strategies for addressing them. Certificate of Completion Available
Published: August 2, 2022
Multimedia
Recording: Risk Factors for Youth Substance Misuse   How can we prevent substance misuse unless we understand what places kids at greater risk of misusing drugs? During this webinar, we will explore the risk factors that place youth at greater risk of substance misuse, as identified by the Social Development Research Group through systematic reviews of the research literature. Time will be spent exploring each risk factor to ensure that preventionists understand the meaning of each factor in order to address them effectively. This training will build on the information shared during the Great Lakes PTTC webinar on the importance of protective factors (May 24, 2022).   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: Describe the importance of focusing on both increasing protective factors and decreasing protective factors List the criteria used to identify factors that place youth at greater risk of substance misuse Understand the nuances that exist for each risk factor Put the risk factor framework into action in their communities   PRESENTER:  Kris Gabrielsen, MPH Kris Gabrielsen is the co-director of the Great Lakes Prevention Technology Transfer Center. She has worked in the substance misuse prevention field for over 30 years. Kris was the Associate Director of the Western Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies (CAPT), co-authored the first Substance Abuse Prevention Specialist Training curriculum, and co-authored the textbook, Substance Abuse Prevention: The Intersection of Science and Practice. As a consultant, she has worked with states and communities across the nation to bridge the gap between research and practice, assisting prevention professionals in maximizing their effectiveness.
Published: June 23, 2022
Multimedia
The Ongoing Opioid Epidemic Part 1: The Current Landscape Josh Esrick, MPP, and Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip June 7, 2022, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will provide a broad overview of opioid trends in the Central East region and nationwide, including what is known about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. It will review changes in use and consequences, and ongoing shifts in substance preferences. As part of this, the webinar will discuss the increasing frequency of polysubstance use and its impact on prevention. Lastly, the webinar will review the latest research on the social determinants of health and other risk and protective factors. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Summarize the latest opioid use and consequence data Explore the known impacts of COVID-19 on opioid trends Highlight the latest information on polysubstance use Review research on opioid risk and protective factors PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing T/TA to numerous organizations. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.  
Published: June 7, 2022
Multimedia
  To prevent substance misuse among our youth, we must enhance protective factors and reduce risk factors. Join this webinar to learn how to build protective factors in the youth in a straight-forward, easy to implement way using the Social Development Strategy.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: Name the elements of the Social Development Strategy Describe how the elements of the Social Development Strategy interact to create protective factors List a minimum of three ways that the Social Development Strategy can be incorporated into daily interactions and prevention strategies with youth   This event was hosted by the Great Lakes Prevention Technology Transfer Center on May 24, 2022.
Published: May 24, 2022
Multimedia
Prevention and the COVID-19 Pandemic Part 2: Preparing for the Future and Learning Lab Josh Esrick, MPP, and Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip February 2, 2022, 1-2:30 PM EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will begin by discussing what lessons learned the prevention field can take from the COVID-19 pandemic, what the 2020 substance use trends discussed in Part 1 may mean for the future. It will include an overview of what steps prevention organizations can take to best address these trends as well as to be better prepared for any future societal-wide impacts. The webinar will also provide a learning lab portion with question prompts for small group discussion, allowing participants to share their own lessons learned and plans for the future with each other. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Review lessons learned for prevention from the pandemic Facilitate participant discussion of shared experiences and future plans Discuss recommendations for improving services post-COVID PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing T/TA to numerous organizations. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.  
Published: February 2, 2022
Multimedia
Prevention and the COVID-19 Pandemic Part 1: Impacts of the Pandemic Josh Esrick, MPP, and Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip January 26, 2022, 1-2:30 PM EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will review all the known impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic that are relevant to substance use prevention professionals. It will review impacts that directly affect prevention organizations including reduced surveillance capacity, lack of access to populations in need, and changes in staff professional and personal lives, among others. The webinar will also discuss the latest research on the impact of the pandemic on risk and protective factors for substance use. It will also discuss how the pandemic led to changes in state policies, such as expanding alcohol home delivery, that may become permanent and may impact substance use risk. Lastly, the webinar will review the available data on trends in substance use and its consequences since the start of the pandemic. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Review the impact of COVID-19 on the capacity of prevention Understand how the pandemic has increased risk of substance use Discuss the effects of state policy changes regarding legal substances Summarize the available data on substance use and its consequences in 2020 PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing T/TA to numerous organizations. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.  
Published: January 26, 2022
Multimedia
  Pacific Southwest PTTC's Unraveling the Mystery of U.S. Alcohol Regulations   Webinar Date: December 15, 2021   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides for Unraveling the Mystery of U.S. Alcohol Regulations *This presentation and the information contained in it is proprietary information of Pam Erickson, and may not be adapted, modified, or disseminated without the prior written permission of Pam Erickson. This presentation is intended to be used by prevention professionals for learning purposes only. This presentation is not 508 compliant.   Webinar Overview and Objectives This presentation aims to "demystify" alcohol regulation. Alcohol regulation is confusing to a lot of people—even regulators! A review of its history helps explain why we regulate the way we do including: why every state is a little different; “control" v. "license" systems; and a three-tier system. Also, the session will indicate how our systems control alcohol problems and point to credible research which confirms the efficacy of system measures.  By the end of the webinar, participants will be able to: Describe the history of alcohol in the United States before Prohibition and the problems which led to the 18th Amendment (Prohibition). Explain the Post-Prohibition history including the importance of Toward Liquor Control (a research study) in developing state systems of alcohol regulation. Describe the various systems states use to control alcohol problems: how they work and why they are important. Identify research from credible sources which confirms the efficacy of our systems.   Audience Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level prevention practitioners and allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenter Pam Erickson, President and CEO of Public Action Management, is a passionate leader on alcohol policy issues. Currently, she owns Public Action Management which operates an education campaign for a “Healthy Alcohol Marketplace.” From 1996 to 2003, she directed the Oregon Liquor Control Commission which included licensing, regulatory enforcement and operating Oregon’s distilled spirits business as a "control state". From 2003 to 2007, she worked at Oregon Partnership to direct statewide leadership and media campaigns to reduce underage drinking. Beginning in 2005, she developed the Campaign for a Healthy Alcohol Market, which is an education campaign designed to explain the purpose and objectives of alcohol regulation in simple terms. She has written several reports on deregulation in the United Kingdom and the US and produces a periodic report for policy makers called, “Issue Briefs.” These reports explain how deregulation can lead to increased social problems such as high rates of underage drinking, public order offenses and alcohol related disease. Pam has also served as an expert witness in key alcohol regulation cases in Kentucky, California, Indiana, and Michigan. Her educational materials and legal expert reports/affidavits are available free of charge at www.healthyalcoholmarket.com.   Webinar Recording View Recording of Unraveling the Mystery of U.S. Alcohol Regulations
Published: December 29, 2021
Multimedia
Stimulant Webinar Series Part 1: Recommendations for Addressing Stimulant Use: What the Data Shows Josh Esrick, MPP, and Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip November 10, 2021, 1-2:30 PM EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will provide an overview of the current scope of stimulant use in the United States and the states of the Central East Region. It will include a review of use and overdose rates, as well as supply-side data. The webinar will also discuss the differences between the current and prior waves of stimulant use. Finally, it will discuss what is known about the factors driving the current wave of use and data sources prevention professionals can use to obtain additional data. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Discuss trends in stimulant use and consequences Understand similarities and differences between current and past stimulant use Summarize the risk and protective factors for stimulant use Review relevant stimulant data sources PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing T/TA to numerous organizations. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Emily Patton, MSc, PgDip, holds a Masters of Science in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Degree in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh. She offers significant professional experience in the fields of public policy development and analysis, criminal justice research, data collection and analysis, program development, and performance management.  
Published: November 10, 2021
Multimedia
COURSE DESCRIPTION Methamphetamine use has increased over the past couple of decades, with overdose consequences mirroring that of opioid use. This webinar provides an overview of the current state of methamphetamine use in the Great Lakes and South Southwest PTTC regions, highlighting the use and overdose patterns, risk and protective factors, and the current state of prevention research. Select the View Resource button above to watch the recording. Below is the PowerPoint for this webinar. PowerPoint Methamphetamine Brief in the Great Lakes and South Southwest PTTC regions Methamphetamine Brief in the Great Lakes Region 5 Methamphetamine Brief in the South Southwest Region 6   PRESENTERS Emily Patton, MSc., Pg.Dip., is a Research Associate with Carnevale Associates, LLC. She offers over nine years of expertise in data analysis, program management, and evaluation. Under the District of Columbia Department of Behavioral Health (DBH), she provides data analysis, programmatic support, and training and technical assistance (TTA) for multiple contracts that serve youth and families in the district. She also serves as a research associate with the Prevention Technology Transfer Center Network (PTTC) Central-East region. In this role, she provides expertise in substance use prevention, mental health, and program management. Prior to joining Carnevale Associates, she worked for CSR Inc., serving as the lead analyst for the Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) Program, which is the largest source of federal justice funding in the country under the direction of the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA). Emily holds a Master of Science with Merit in Abnormal and Clinical Psychology from Swansea University and a Postgraduate Diploma in Criminology and Criminal Justice from the University of Edinburgh.   Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates, LLC. Mr. Esrick has extensive experience researching, writing, evaluating, and presenting on substance use prevention and other behavioral health topics. He has developed numerous Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Prevention Technology Transfer Center and Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ products and trainings. Among other projects for SAMHSA, he has helped write annual Data Collection, Analysis, and Reporting reports, conduct evaluations of the Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grants, and wrote the monthly Financing Focus for the Center for Financing Reform and Innovation. Mr. Esrick has also published in the International Journal of Drug Policy on considerations surrounding marijuana legalization and in Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy on the modern usage of fear-based prevention messaging. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from the State University of New York at Buffalo and a Masters of Public Policy from George Washington University.    
Published: November 1, 2021
Multimedia
                                                          Using Data to Tell Your Story: Advancing Prevention Efforts into the Future SESSION 2  (WEBINAR) Josh Esrick, MPP, Jessica Goldberg, MSW, MPH, and Cory Morton, PhD, MSW October 19, 2021, 1-2:30 PM EST COURSE DESCRIPTION As our country continues to grapple with the Covid-19 pandemic, communities are experiencing emerging and worsening substance misuse problems relating to it. Many of these issues—for example, easing retail restrictions for alcohol and marijuana and the devastating rise in fatal opioid overdoses nationally—we are aware of it. But, many we are not, in part because the pandemic has hindered our ability to collect data to better understand what is happening in our communities. We as prevention practitioners need to have data to tell the story of how the pandemic has affected substance misuse in our communities, and to use that data to bring partners to the table to plan, implement and support strategies to meet these new challenges. This four-part virtual learning event series, featuring two webinars and two interactive “learning labs”, will explore finding, collecting, understanding and, ultimately, using data to tell your community’s story through the covid-19 pandemic. It will provide you with the tools necessary to locate existing substance misuse-related data, fill in data gaps with local data collection, and troubleshoot issues relating to data quality. It will also highlight the importance of using data to create a compelling narrative about your community’s experience, interpreting data appropriately and framing it as a story that will resonate with your key stakeholders and the public alike. During the learning lab sessions, participants will have the opportunity to apply the information shared during the webinar sessions through hands-on activities and case study examples. Note: Recordings of the two interactive "learning labs" will not be posted. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Discuss the importance of using data to tell your community’s “story” with regard to substance misuse Describe strategies for working with imperfect data to tell your community story List steps in the process of analyzing and using data to guide current and future prevention efforts Discuss ways to share your community story with key stakeholders to build prevention capacity PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing T/TA to numerous organizations. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics.   Jessica Goldberg, MSW, MPH  is a certified prevention specialist and highly skilled trainer, designs and delivers impactful learning events, consultation, and coaching support. For over a decade, she has specialized in building capacity to improve health, mental health, and behavioral health. She brings a deep commitment to health equity and mental health equity to her leadership of in-person and virtual training and technical assistance (TTA). Her areas of expertise include preventing youth substance use; promoting cross-sector collaborations; addressing health disparities; and supporting strategic planning, logic model development, and sustainability planning. Jess holds an MPH and an MSW from Boston University.   Dr. Cory Morton, Assistant Research Professor has over ten years of experience conducting research in the field of prevention science. His research investigates the community context of substance use—whether structural features of neighborhoods, such as access to substance use and social services, lessen substance related harms and support individual and family well-being. Cory’s coordinates the Northeast and Caribbean Prevention PTTC’s special focus on geospatial applications, providing webinars and technical assistance on using mapping to determine community need or to evidence change. Cory holds a Ph.D. in Social Work from Rutgers University.
Published: October 19, 2021
Multimedia
                                                          Using Data to Tell Your Story: Advancing Prevention Efforts into the Future SESSION 1  (WEBINAR) Josh Esrick, MPP, Jessica Goldberg, MSW, MPH, and Ivy Jones Turner, MA October 5, 2021, 1-2:30 PM EST COURSE DESCRIPTION As our country continues to grapple with the Covid-19 pandemic, communities are experiencing emerging and worsening substance misuse problems relating to it. Many of these issues—for example, easing retail restrictions for alcohol and marijuana and the devastating rise in fatal opioid overdoses nationally—we are aware of it. But, many we are not, in part because the pandemic has hindered our ability to collect data to better understand what is happening in our communities. We as prevention practitioners need to have data to tell the story of how the pandemic has affected substance misuse in our communities, and to use that data to bring partners to the table to plan, implement and support strategies to meet these new challenges. This four-part virtual learning event series, featuring two webinars and two interactive “learning labs”, will explore finding, collecting, understanding and, ultimately, using data to tell your community’s story through the covid-19 pandemic. It will provide you with the tools necessary to locate existing substance misuse-related data, fill in data gaps with local data collection, and troubleshoot issues relating to data quality. It will also highlight the importance of using data to create a compelling narrative about your community’s experience, interpreting data appropriately and framing it as a story that will resonate with your key stakeholders and the public alike. During the learning lab sessions, participants will have the opportunity to apply the information shared during the webinar sessions through hands-on activities and case study examples. Note: Recordings of the two interactive "learning labs" will not be posted. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Discuss substance use and misuse-related problems and related behaviors (e.g., changes in substances used, ways in which substances are used, consumption and consequence rates, relevant risk and protective factors) that have emerged in the past year List key considerations for collecting substance misuse-related data to develop your community story Identify strategies for filling data gaps caused or exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic Explore common issues associated with the quality of collected data PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing T/TA to numerous organizations. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics.   Jessica Goldberg, MSW, MPH  is a certified prevention specialist and highly skilled trainer, designs and delivers impactful learning events, consultation, and coaching support. For over a decade, she has specialized in building capacity to improve health, mental health, and behavioral health. She brings a deep commitment to health equity and mental health equity to her leadership of in-person and virtual training and technical assistance (TTA). Her areas of expertise include preventing youth substance use; promoting cross-sector collaborations; addressing health disparities; and supporting strategic planning, logic model development, and sustainability planning. Jess holds an MPH and an MSW from Boston University.   Ivy Jones Turner, MA , an expert in behavioral and mental health promotion and prevention, is an experienced program leader, technical assistance (TA) specialist, applied researcher, and evaluator. Her expertise includes building the capacity of schools and organizations to effectively research, implement, evaluate, and sustain interventions to prevent substance misuse, suicide, youth violence, and bullying, and to promote social-emotional and mental health. Ivy delivers culturally competent, comprehensive support that helps EDC’s federal, state, community, and school district clients address system-level issues, incorporate evidence-based practices, monitor progress, and support staff in achieving program goals. Ivy holds an MA in Public Administration from Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and is certified in Massachusetts as a specialist in both prevention and conflict mediation.
Published: October 5, 2021
Multimedia
This presentation is an Spanish translation of a webinar that was presented in Portuguese. Este webinar oferecerá uma visão geral das políticas dos Estados Unidos da América e dos padrões de uso de substâncias pelos jovens e como elas afetam os jovens de ascendência latina/hispânica. Este treinamento também trará sugestões baseadas em evidências para professores, pais e líderes da comunidade sobre como ajudar a prevenir o início precoce dessas drogas. Additional Resources/Recursos Adicionales/Recursos Adicionais Factsheets/hojas informativas/fichas técnicas English - Download the Smoking and vaping in the Americas: Policy implications for Prevention factsheet for more information and resources Español - Haga clic aquí para descargar la hoja educativa titulada Fumando y vapeando en las Américas: Implicaciones Políticas para la Prevención. Português - Clique aqui para fazer o download da ficha educativa intitulada Fumando e vaporizando nas Américas: Considerações sobre Prevenção e Políticas Públicas   Translations       Biogafia: Dra. Beatriz Carlini, PhD, MPH (Bia) é pesquisadora cientista do Instituto de Adição, Drogas e Álcool e Drogas da Universidade de Washington (ADAI) e Professora Associada Afiliada da Escola de Saúde Pública do Departamento de Serviços de Saúde. Em sua carreira de pesquisa, Dr. Carlini tem se dedicado a compreender o impacto na saúde pública de substâncias psicoativas legais, como álcool, inalantes, tabaco e, mais recentemente, cannabis. Desde 2016, Dra. Carlini lidera a Pesquisa e Educação sobre Cannabis da ADAI, incluindo a coordenação de colaboração com outros pesquisadores de cannabis na Universidade de Washington, atuando como Presidente do Programa de Simpósio de Pesquisa de Cannabis da Universidade de Washington e agindo como ponto de conexão entre legisladores no estado e pesquisadores de outras universidades . Em 2019, ela foi nomeada Diretora do Programa de Estudos sobre Tabaco na Escola de Saúde Pública da Universidade de Washington, onde também leciona Disparidades de Saúde e Justiça Social relacionadas ao Tabaco. Como uma imigrante de primeira geração e cidadã americana nascida no exterior, Dr. Carlini está especialmente interessada no impacto da cannabis e do uso do tabaco na perpetuação das disparidades sociais e de saúde. Dr. Carlini tem paixão por promover a inclusão social, desafiar estereótipos e combater o estigma. Ela aplica uma lente de equidade em seu trabalho como pesquisadora e educadora.
Published: August 30, 2021
Multimedia
    Selecting Evidence-based Interventions: Finding the  Best Fit    Webinar Date: July 28, 2021   Webinar Slides Webinar Slides for Selecting Evidence-based Interventions: Finding the Best Fit   Webinar Support Materials: Selecting Best-fit Programs and Practices: Guidance for Substance Misuse Prevention Practitioners Guide to Online Registries for Substance Misuse Prevention Evidence-based Programs and Practices How to Conduct a Thorough Literature Search A Primer on How to Read a Scientific Paper for Substance Misuse Prevention Professionals   Overview Prevention leaders are dedicated to improving the health of their communities through effective strategies to reduce substance misuse and its related consequences. Perhaps the most critical decisions prevention staff weigh are what set of interventions to implement, typically with limited resources. This webinar will provide an introduction to best processes and resources available to use when making these critical decisions. Attendees will also be given priority to enroll in a new 6-week distance learning course for in-depth, skill-based and real-world learning and practice in selecting evidence-based programs, practices, and policies.   Objectives By the end of this training, participants will be able to: • Describe key features of an evidence-based intervention • Name at least two locations to locate potential evidence-based interventions • Describe the three conditions for determining the “fit” of an evidence-based intervention   Audience Community, tribal, jurisdiction, and state-level prevention practitioners and allied health partners and community members located in the Pacific Southwest states and jurisdictions of American Samoa, Arizona, California, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Hawaii, Nevada, Republic of the Marshall Islands, and the Republic of Palau.   Presenter Alyssa O’Hair, MPH, MA, CPS. Alyssa O’Hair is a Senior Manager, Workforce Development at  the Center for the Application of Substance Abuse Technologies (CASAT) at the University of  Nevada, Reno (UNR). With over 10 years of experience providing training and technical  assistance, she currently serves as the Project Director for the Pacific Southwest Prevention  Technology Transfer Center, which aims to build the skills of the substance abuse prevention  workforce. Alyssa has extensive subject matter knowledge in training and technical assistance provision; public health approach for prevention; community needs assessments; data-driven  decision-making; and evaluation design and methodology.   Webinar Recording View Webinar Recording: Selecting Evidence-based Interventions: Finding the Best Fit    
Published: August 4, 2021
Multimedia
This presentation is an English translation of a webinar that was presented in Portuguese. Este webinar oferecerá uma visão geral das políticas dos Estados Unidos da América e dos padrões de uso de substâncias pelos jovens e como elas afetam os jovens de ascendência latina/hispânica. Este treinamento também trará sugestões baseadas em evidências para professores, pais e líderes da comunidade sobre como ajudar a prevenir o início precoce dessas drogas. Additional Resources/Recursos Adicionales/Recursos Adicionais Factsheets/hojas informativas/fichas técnicas English - Download the Smoking and vaping in the Americas: Policy implications for Prevention factsheet for more information and resources Español - Haga clic aquí para descargar la hoja educativa titulada Fumando y vapeando en las Américas: Implicaciones Políticas para la Prevención. Português - Clique aqui para fazer o download da ficha educativa intitulada Fumando e vaporizando nas Américas: Considerações sobre Prevenção e Políticas Públicas   Translations       Biogafia: Dra. Beatriz Carlini, PhD, MPH (Bia) é pesquisadora cientista do Instituto de Adição, Drogas e Álcool e Drogas da Universidade de Washington (ADAI) e Professora Associada Afiliada da Escola de Saúde Pública do Departamento de Serviços de Saúde. Em sua carreira de pesquisa, Dr. Carlini tem se dedicado a compreender o impacto na saúde pública de substâncias psicoativas legais, como álcool, inalantes, tabaco e, mais recentemente, cannabis. Desde 2016, Dra. Carlini lidera a Pesquisa e Educação sobre Cannabis da ADAI, incluindo a coordenação de colaboração com outros pesquisadores de cannabis na Universidade de Washington, atuando como Presidente do Programa de Simpósio de Pesquisa de Cannabis da Universidade de Washington e agindo como ponto de conexão entre legisladores no estado e pesquisadores de outras universidades . Em 2019, ela foi nomeada Diretora do Programa de Estudos sobre Tabaco na Escola de Saúde Pública da Universidade de Washington, onde também leciona Disparidades de Saúde e Justiça Social relacionadas ao Tabaco. Como uma imigrante de primeira geração e cidadã americana nascida no exterior, Dr. Carlini está especialmente interessada no impacto da cannabis e do uso do tabaco na perpetuação das disparidades sociais e de saúde. Dr. Carlini tem paixão por promover a inclusão social, desafiar estereótipos e combater o estigma. Ela aplica uma lente de equidade em seu trabalho como pesquisadora e educadora.
Published: August 1, 2021
Multimedia
  Webinar: The Risk and Protective Factor Framework - Session 3: Measuring risk and protective factors for your community   Webinar Date: May 20, 2021   Webinar Description Working in the field of prevention and healthy youth development, most of us have all heard the term, ‘risk and protective factors’ but what does that really mean? The risk and protective factor framework is foundational to Prevention Science. Join Kevin Haggerty, the Director of the Northwest PTTC, and John Briney, Research Scientist and Data Manager, for a deeper dive into risk and protective factors for healthy youth development – what they are, why they’re important, and how to measure them at the community level.   Objectives By the end of this 3-session series participants will be able to: Define ‘shared risk and protective factors’ for healthy youth development Describe how risk and protective factors are determined  Discuss how understanding of shared risk and protective factors is evolving  Explore what understanding risk and protective factors means for your community’s work in prevention? Explain at least 3 methods for obtaining community-level information on the risk and protective factors for YOUR community’s youth and discuss pros and cons of these different approaches Share how youth survey measures were developed and tested for risk and protective factors Decide on one next step for YOUR community    Presenters Kevin Haggerty MSW, Ph.D. specializes in prevention programs at the community, school and family level. He is the Director of the Social Development Research Group. Dr. Haggerty serves as the PI/ Project Director for the Northwest PTTC.  He is a Professor at the University of Washington (UW) School of Social Work. For more than 30 years, he has focused on developing innovative ways to organize the scientific knowledge base for prevention so that parents, communities and schools can better identify, assess and prioritize customized approaches that meet their needs.  He has an extensive research background in the intersection of biological and environmental risks for drug abuse in emerging adults and is an expert on substance abuse and delinquency prevention. Additionally, Dr. Haggerty is an investigator of the Community Youth Development Study, which tests the effectiveness of the Communities That Care program.   John Briney is the Senior Data Manager at the Social Development Research Group (SDRG) with more than 25 years of experience in social science research. The majority of his work at SDRG has focused on the Community Youth Development Study, a randomized test of the Communities That Care prevention planning system.  He currently manages data across several research projects and assists communities with the administration and analysis of the Communities That Care Youth Survey through his work with the Center for CTC. John has a background in Political Science and Public Administration. During his recent COVID-19 quarantine he has spent far too much time with his wife and two children in their home in rural eastern Oregon.John S. Briney is the Data Manager at the School of Social Development Research Group.   Webinar Recording View Webinar   Webinar Slides Download Slides - The Risk and Protective Factor Framework - Session 3: Measuring risk and protective factors for your community   Additional Resources Communites that Care - Youth Survey Scale Dictionary   View the Other Webinars in this Series: The Risk and Protective Factor Framework - Session 1: Risk Factors The Risk and Protective Factor Framework - Session 2: Protective Factors
Published: May 25, 2021
Multimedia
  Webinar: The Risk and Protective Factor Framework - Session 1: Risk Factors   Webinar Date: May 6, 2021   Webinar Description Working in the field of prevention and healthy youth development, most of us have all heard the term, ‘risk and protective factors’ but what does that really mean? The risk and protective factor framework is foundational to Prevention Science. Join Kevin Haggerty, the Director of the Northwest PTTC, and John Briney, Research Scientist and Data Manager, for a deeper dive into risk and protective factors for healthy youth development – what they are, why they’re important, and how to measure them at the community level.   Objectives By the end of this 3-session series participants will be able to: Define ‘shared risk and protective factors’ for healthy youth development Describe how risk and protective factors are determined  Discuss how understanding of shared risk and protective factors is evolving  Explore what understanding risk and protective factors means for your community’s work in prevention? Explain at least 3 methods for obtaining community-level information on the risk and protective factors for YOUR community’s youth and discuss pros and cons of these different approaches Share how youth survey measures were developed and tested for risk and protective factors Decide on one next step for YOUR community    Presenters Kevin Haggerty MSW, Ph.D. specializes in prevention programs at the community, school and family level. He is the Director of the Social Development Research Group. Dr. Haggerty serves as the PI/ Project Director for the Northwest PTTC.  He is a Professor at the University of Washington (UW) School of Social Work. For more than 30 years, he has focused on developing innovative ways to organize the scientific knowledge base for prevention so that parents, communities and schools can better identify, assess and prioritize customized approaches that meet their needs.  He has an extensive research background in the intersection of biological and environmental risks for drug abuse in emerging adults and is an expert on substance abuse and delinquency prevention. Additionally, Dr. Haggerty is an investigator of the Community Youth Development Study, which tests the effectiveness of the Communities That Care program.   John Briney is the Senior Data Manager at the Social Development Research Group (SDRG) with more than 25 years of experience in social science research. The majority of his work at SDRG has focused on the Community Youth Development Study, a randomized test of the Communities That Care prevention planning system.  He currently manages data across several research projects and assists communities with the administration and analysis of the Communities That Care Youth Survey through his work with the Center for CTC. John has a background in Political Science and Public Administration. During his recent COVID-19 quarantine he has spent far too much time with his wife and two children in their home in rural eastern Oregon.John S. Briney is the Data Manager at the School of Social Development Research Group.   Webinar Recording View Webinar   Webinar Slides Download Slides - The Risk and Protective Factor Framework - Session 1: Risk Factors   Additional Resources Southwest ATTC: AABH X COE: Structural Racism and Black Mental Health Surgeon General’s Report - Prevention YouTube Videos: Peer & Individual Risk Factors Community Risk Factors Family & School Risk Factors The Science of Risk Factors   View the Other Webinars in this Series: The Risk and Protective Factor Framework - Session 2: Protective Factors The Risk and Protective Factor Framework - Session 3: Measuring risk and protective factors for your community
Published: May 25, 2021
Online Course
The following e-learning course provide an overview of the Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) protocol for use with adolescents (ages 9 to 22). The content of this e-learning course was designed for prevention professionals, school personnel, social workers, addictions counselors, and other non-medical professionals. Course Objectives: 1. Describe what SBIRT stands for and what each component means. 2. Identify why SBIRT is relevant and important for use with adolescents and young adults. 3. Demonstrate the ability to recognize the prevalence of substance use among youth and how SBIRT can prevent longer-term problems. 4. Define standard measures of various types of drinks/alcohol to increase knowledge of baseline information and guidelines regarding moderate and high-risk alcohol use. Certificate of Completion Available
Published: May 14, 2021
Multimedia
Este webinar oferecerá uma visão geral das políticas dos Estados Unidos da América e dos padrões de uso de substâncias pelos jovens e como elas afetam os jovens de ascendência latina/hispânica. Este treinamento também trará sugestões baseadas em evidências para professores, pais e líderes da comunidade sobre como ajudar a prevenir o início precoce dessas drogas. Additional Resources/Recursos Adicionales/Recursos Adicionais Factsheets/hojas informativas/fichas técnicas English - Download the Smoking and vaping in the Americas: Policy implications for Prevention factsheet for more information and resources Español - Haga clic aquí para descargar la hoja educativa titulada Fumando y vapeando en las Américas: Implicaciones Políticas para la Prevención. Português - Clique aqui para fazer o download da ficha educativa intitulada Fumando e vaporizando nas Américas: Considerações sobre Prevenção e Políticas Públicas   Webinar Slides English Spanish Português   Translations     Biogafia: Dra. Beatriz Carlini, PhD, MPH (Bia) é pesquisadora cientista do Instituto de Adição, Drogas e Álcool e Drogas da Universidade de Washington (ADAI) e Professora Associada Afiliada da Escola de Saúde Pública do Departamento de Serviços de Saúde. Em sua carreira de pesquisa, Dr. Carlini tem se dedicado a compreender o impacto na saúde pública de substâncias psicoativas legais, como álcool, inalantes, tabaco e, mais recentemente, cannabis. Desde 2016, Dra. Carlini lidera a Pesquisa e Educação sobre Cannabis da ADAI, incluindo a coordenação de colaboração com outros pesquisadores de cannabis na Universidade de Washington, atuando como Presidente do Programa de Simpósio de Pesquisa de Cannabis da Universidade de Washington e agindo como ponto de conexão entre legisladores no estado e pesquisadores de outras universidades . Em 2019, ela foi nomeada Diretora do Programa de Estudos sobre Tabaco na Escola de Saúde Pública da Universidade de Washington, onde também leciona Disparidades de Saúde e Justiça Social relacionadas ao Tabaco. Como uma imigrante de primeira geração e cidadã americana nascida no exterior, Dr. Carlini está especialmente interessada no impacto da cannabis e do uso do tabaco na perpetuação das disparidades sociais e de saúde. Dr. Carlini tem paixão por promover a inclusão social, desafiar estereótipos e combater o estigma. Ela aplica uma lente de equidade em seu trabalho como pesquisadora e educadora.
Published: May 13, 2021
Multimedia
Preventing Underage Alcohol Use Part 2: Addressing Use Among Younger Youth Josh Esrick, MPP, and Robin LaVallee, MPP May 12, 2021, 2-3:30 PM EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will support alcohol prevention efforts for elementary- and middle school-aged youth. It will include a review of the data on younger youth alcohol use prevalence and patterns, and research on its risk and protective factors. The webinar will discuss how to improve needs assessment efforts focusing on this population, including strategies to improve primary data collection. It will also identify and highlight evidence-based prevention programs intended to serve this younger population. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Overview prevalence data on younger underage alcohol use Identify risk and protective factors most relevant to younger youth Discuss opportunities to improve needs assessment and data collection processes Explore evidence-based prevention strategies and related resources PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing T/TA to numerous organizations. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Robin A. LaVallee, MPP, is a Senior Research Associate at Carnevale Associates, LLC. She has over a decade of experience applying her expertise in policy research, evaluation, performance measurement, data collection, and analysis in the public health, substance use, and criminal justice arenas. For more than ten years, Ms. LaVallee previously conducted alcohol epidemiology and policy research supporting the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism's Alcohol Epidemiologic Data System and National Alcohol Education Program. She currently supports the Office of the Chief Financial Officer's performance management and strategic planning efforts within the Office of Justice Programs.  
Published: May 12, 2021
Multimedia
Preventing Underage Alcohol Use Part 1: An Overview of Data and Strategies Josh Esrick, MPP, and Robin LaVallee, MPP April 28, 2021, 1-2:30 PM EST COURSE DESCRIPTION This webinar will provide a broad overview of the current state of underage drinking and related prevention efforts. It will include a review of the data on the prevalence of alcohol use and alcohol use patterns, along with data on the adverse effects of underage alcohol use and research on its risk and protective factors. The webinar will also discuss what is known about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on underage alcohol use. Finally, it will provide an overview of Federal underage drinking prevention efforts and the types of evidence-based strategies that prevention professionals can implement. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Summarize the data on the state of underage drinking and its consequences Explain the research on risk and protective factors for engaging in underage drinking Explore what is known and unknown about the impact of COVID-19 Overview Federal prevention efforts Highlight evidence-based prevention strategies and related resources PRESENTERS Josh Esrick, MPP is a Senior Policy Analyst with Carnevale Associates. Josh has extensive experience in substance use prevention; researching, writing, and presenting on best practice and knowledge development publications, briefs, and reference guides; and developing and providing T/TA to numerous organizations. He developed numerous SAMHSA Center for the Application of Prevention Technologies’ (CAPT) products on strategies to prevent opioid misuse and overdose, risk and protective factors for substance use, youth substance use prevention strategies, youth substance use trends, emerging substance use trends, the potential regulations surrounding marijuana legalization, as well as numerous other topics. Robin A. LaVallee, MPP, is a Senior Research Associate at Carnevale Associates, LLC. She has over a decade of experience applying her expertise in policy research, evaluation, performance measurement, data collection, and analysis in the public health, substance use, and criminal justice arenas. For more than ten years, Ms. LaVallee previously conducted alcohol epidemiology and policy research supporting the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism's Alcohol Epidemiologic Data System and National Alcohol Education Program. She currently supports the Office of the Chief Financial Officer's performance management and strategic planning efforts within the Office of Justice Programs.    
Published: April 28, 2021
Multimedia
Problem Gambling Prevention: The Facts, Using Public Health Models, and Integrating Programming with Substance Misuse Prevention Heather Eshleman, M.P.H. March 24, 2021, 1-2 PM EST COURSE DESCRIPTION March is Problem Gambling Awareness Month. With the legalization of sports betting in mid-Atlantic states as well as increased internet gambling due to COVID-19 restrictions, gambling has never been more accessible to youth and adults. Basic facts on youth and adult gambling will be discussed with emphasis on data from MD, DC, WV, DE, PA, and VA. Public health models will be used to show how problem gambling can be prevented and integrated with alcohol and substance misuse prevention programming. LEARNING OBJECTIVES To learn problem gambling facts and the basics of problem gambling prevention. To examine how public health models can be used to prevent problem gambling in youth and adults. To explore how to integrate problem gambling prevention strategies with the work of alcohol and substance misuse prevention and mental health promotion. PRESENTERS Heather Eshleman, M.P.H., is the Prevention Manager at the Maryland Center of Excellence on Problem Gambling.  She works collaboratively with community organizations, schools, and government agencies to prevent underage and problem gambling as well as oversee special population and youth grants.  She currently leads the Center’s efforts in compiling an underage and problem gambling prevention needs assessment to provide baseline data to guide future prevention strategies.  She served as the Alcohol and Substance Abuse Prevention Supervisor at the Anne Arundel County Department of Health from 2006-2019, overseeing the Substance Abuse Prevention coalitions, the Opioid Misuse Prevention Program, the Strengthening Families Program, the Fatal Overdose Review Team, and Coordination of the Students Against Destructive Decisions Chapters.  Before becoming Supervisor, from 2002-2006, Heather was a Grants Administrator at Anne Arundel County Department of Health.  Heather received her Masters in Public Health from the University at Albany School of Public Health and her Bachelor’s degree in School and Community Health Education from Towson University.  Heather served in the United States Peace Corps in Morocco, North Africa, as a Maternal and Child Health volunteer, working on hygiene promotion and pre-natal care for two years.    
Published: March 24, 2021
Multimedia
Self-Paced Online Courses: Demystifying Data: Gathering and Using Local Risk and Protective Factor Data for Prevention Part 1: Gathering Local Risk and Protective Factor Data for Prevention Part 1 of this two-part online course series will describe the importance of gathering data for community needs assessments and evaluation, including the types of data to collect. Participants will review key risk and protective factors associated with substance use and mental health. The course explores existing data sources, assessment of data gaps, and options for collecting primary data at the local level.  By the end of the course, participants will: Learn about key risk and protective factors to assess at the individual, family, peer, school, and community levels; Identify sources of existing data on risk and protective factors; and Assess strategies for developing a data collection plan to address data gaps at the local level.   Part 2: Using Local Risk and Protective Factor Data for Prevention During Part 2 of this online course series, participants will learn about data quality and quantity—having enough data and having the right data. The course explores processes for prioritizing risk and protective factors to determine which to address with prevention efforts and shares examples. This course will conclude with recommendations for ongoing monitoring to inform evaluation efforts. At the conclusion of this course, participants will have learned about: Tips for assessing the quality and quantity of the data they’ve gathered to determine readiness for prioritizing and planning; Prioritization processes, including how to format your data; prioritization dimensions to consider, and tips for making the process interactive and engaging, and  The importance of ongoing data gathering and collection efforts in order to evaluate local prevention efforts.   Certificates of Completion available for one hour each upon successfully completing the quiz with 80% or more correct.   Click here to get started: https://healtheknowledge.org/course/index.php?categoryid=101  
Published: March 9, 2021
1 2 3 4
Copyright © 2024 Prevention Technology Transfer Center (PTTC) Network
envelopephone-handsetmap-markermagnifiercrossmenuchevron-down