Products and Resources Catalog

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Product Type
Target Audience
Language
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Date Range
eNewsletter or Blog
In this Issue A Focus on Tribal Behavioral Health Providers: The Need to Advocate for the Wellbeing of Generations Epi Corner: Building Resilience in Military Families New! Swimming Upstream with Data: Military Individuals and Families What's Happening Around the Region? Webinar: Charting Paths to Prevention: Mapping Social Vulnerability and Alcohol-Related Deaths Webinar: Principles for Prevention Professionals Across the Spectrum Free Logic Model Technical Assistance We're hiring: Data Training and Technical Assistance Specialist
Published: May 16, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
In the aftermath of a tornado, the effects on mental and emotional health can be just as profound as the physical devastation. That's why our team is committed to equipping prevention professionals and their partners with the resources to support the communities they serve when natural disasters strike. We understand that addressing trauma and promoting mental wellness are critical components of a post-disaster response. That's why we, with the help of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) have curated a collection of online resources suitable for individuals across the lifespan; specifically designed to assist in navigating the emotional aftermath of a tornado. Resources to Support Children Parent Guidelines for Helping Children after a Tornado Tips for Parents on Media Coverage of the Tornado Questions to Ask Your Children About the Tornado After the Tornado: Helping Young Children Heal Teacher Guidelines for Helping Students after a Tornado Trinka and Sam and the Swirling Twirling Wind—e-book for young children (En Español) Tornado Response for Kids: Right After a Tornado Tornado Response for Teens: Right After a Tornado Helping Youth after a Community Trauma: Tips for Educators(En Español) Age-Related Reactions to a Traumatic Event(En Español) Simple Activities for Children and Adolescents(En Español) The Power of Parenting: How to Help Your Child After a Parent or Caregiver Dies Once I Was Very Very Scared(En Español)  – children’s book for young children Pause-Reset-Nourish (PRN) to Promote Wellbeing(En Español) (for responders)   Psychological First Aid The NCTSN also has resources for responders on Psychological First Aid (PFA). PFA is an early intervention to support children, adolescents, adults, and families impacted by these types of events. The PFA Wallet Card (En Español) provides a quick reminder of the core actions. The PFA online training course is also available on the NCTSN Learning Center. PFA handouts include: Parent Tips for Helping Infants and Toddlers(En Español) Parent Tips for Helping Preschoolers(En Español) Parent Tips for Helping School-Age Children(En Español) Parent Tips for Helping Adolescents(En Español) Tips for Adults(En Español) Mobile Apps Help Kids Cope PFA Mobile SAMHSA Behavioral Health Disaster Response App Bounce Back Now(En Español) Disaster Helpline SAMHSA has a Disaster Distress Helpline—call or text 1-800-985-5990 (for Spanish, press “2”) to be connected to a trained counselor 24/7/365.
Published: May 16, 2024
Multimedia
Webinar Description The association between chronic exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and poor behavioral health outcomes across the lifespan is well-established, but ACEs are preventable. This webinar will explore the evidence supporting upstream strategies that can prevent ACEs from happening in the first place as well as positive childhood experiences (PCEs) that can mitigate the harms of ACEs. Recent data sources that can be used to monitor ACEs and PCEs at the state-level to guide prevention and evaluation activities will also be explored.   Webinar Objectives By the end of this webinar, participants will be able to: Explain the influence of ACEs and PCEs on risk behaviors using a lifecourse perspective; Describe primary prevention strategies that can prevent ACEs; Describe how PCEs can buffer the impact of ACEs on behavioral health outcomes; Identify state-level data sources that can be used to monitor ACEs and PCEs.   Presenters Amanda Haboush-Deloye earned her Ph.D. in experimental psychology and her Master of Arts in clinical psychology from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Amanda's research background is on mental health in adolescent, adult, and older adult populations. She also has a particular interest in improving research methods to be more culturally competent. As a researcher at NICRP, she has designed and implemented many research projects regarding children's physical health, mental health, and education, as well as children's advocacy initiatives such as Every Child Matters in Nevada and Prevent Child Abuse Nevada. Being a Las Vegas native, Amanda aims to remain in Nevada and work with NICRP to create a healthy community where families and children are a priority.   Kristin Clements-Nolle received her MPH in Behavioral Sciences and Ph.D in Epidemiology, both from the University of California, Berkeley. Kristen is a nationally recognized adolescent health researcher and has published extensively on the impact of ACE exposure on health outcomes across the lifespan. She also investigates social, community, and family factors that can prevent ACE exposure and/or mitigate the impact on behavioral health outcomes. Kristen is currently a Professor of Epidemiology at the University of Nevada, Reno School of Public Health and the principal investigator for a five year grant funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that will focus on preventing ACEs and promoting positive childhood experiences in Nevada.   Post Webinar Materials Preventing ACEs and Their Associated Harms Recording Preventing ACEs and Their Associated Harms Slide Deck   Questions Please email Reagan Hart at ([email protected]) for any questions.
Published: May 2, 2024
Multimedia
Identifying and Mitigating Vicarious Trauma and Staff Burnout Laura Hinds, MSW, LCSW March 28, 2024, 1:00pm-3:00pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION Compassion Fatigue and Burnout not only increase the risk of Vicarious Experiencing challenges for our staff, they endanger those they serve. This event will support supervisors and managers in identifying and addressing the signs and symptoms of Compassion Fatigue and Burnout in an effort to safeguard their staff’s practice and clients’ well-being. This session will include information as well as practical suggestions for intervention. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Recite at least 4 ways in which Compassion Fatigue and Vicarious Trauma present in their staff working people living with Substance Use Disorder. Identify the importance of supervision in mitigating and supporting staff who may be experiencing Vicarious Trauma, Compassion Fatigue, or Burnout. Name at least 5 strategies for engaging staff in planning and utilizing Self-Management skills. PRESENTERS Laura Hinds, MSW, LCSW, is a clinical social worker with experience in medical, behavioral and mental health settings. Laura has had the pleasure of working with high acuity special needs populations and their providers for over 22 years. An alumna and instructor at Penn’s School of Social Policy and Practice for 13 years, and Bryn Mawr’s School of Social Work and Social Research’s for the past 4 years, Laura has supported the learning and education of new social workers, veterans in the field, and their interdisciplinary partners. With a focus on trauma, human and gender development, racial equity, and crisis intervention Laura supports special needs populations and those who serve them.  
Published: March 28, 2024
eNewsletter or Blog
In this Issue Collegiate Network Aims to Reduce Substance Misuse on Arkansas Campuses Epi Corner: Youth in the Juvenile Justice System What's Happening Around the Region? Free Logic Model Technical Assistance Webinar: Mobilizing Marginalized Communities to Prevention Substance Misuse What's New? Using Artificial Intelligence in Prevention
Published: March 20, 2024
Multimedia
Learning Session Recording and  Follow-Up Materials  December 12, 2023   Learning Session Description Health and health equity are determined by the conditions in which the American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) population have been exposed to and continue to thrive in. This Learning Session will explore the common determinants of health that contribute to substance use among AI/AN populations. Further exploration of how common traditional AI/AN healing practices and approaches are integrated with substance use prevention programming will be discussed.     Learning Session Objectives By the end of this learning session, participants will be able to: Explain how Social Determinants of Health have contributed to substance use in AI/AN populations. Discuss the “Culture is Prevention” approach in the work of substance use prevention work. Identify common AI/AN cultural approaches and practices used in AI/AN healthcare systems addressing Substance Use and Abuse. Employ strategies to meaningfully and respectfully collaborate with tribal entities.   Learning Session Recording and Slides Prioritizing Equity in Prevention Recording Prioritizing Equity in Prevention Slide Deck (PDF)   Presenter Evelina Maho, MAdm.,  is a member of the Navajo tribe and resides in Northern Arizona. Holds a Master’s Degree in Administration with an emphasis in Health Sciences, Undergraduate Degree in Clinical Dietetics and Chemistry from Northern Arizona University; carries executive leadership and directorship experience in the healthcare arena. Evelina currently works with the National Council for Urban Indian Health (NCUIH). At NCUIH, supports over 41 Urban Indian Health Organizations in the US. Evelina’s experience involves working with AI/AN Health Systems through quality and systems change approach. Her career started and also continues to support Public Health in AI/AN healthcare systems. Part-owner and founder of YM Associates, LLC a newly established consulting business involved with public health projects. In addition, enjoys teaching as an Adjunct Faculty member at Falmouth Institute in her spare time.   Questions Contact Britany Wiele ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this learning session.
Published: January 19, 2024
Multimedia
Nashville based author and speaker Trish Luna needed the story more than 30 years ago for her then-very young children Nick and Sami as their father struggled with substance use disorder (SUD), a struggle that eventually took his life. Trish knows first-hand that shame, stigma, and chaos that comes from dealing with a loved one’s addiction, which can impact generations to come. Trish has a master’s degree in philosophy and ethics from Vanderbilt University and has a diverse professional background, and “Lambi Talks About Addiction’ A Book About Prevention” continues her life’s work. She remains an in-demand speaker at school’s, court programs, treatment centers, non-profits, and professional conferences. For additional information and resources, please visit www.lambilearns.com or email [email protected] The funder of this project, along with all other products of the Mid-America PTTC is the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Although funded by SAMHSA, the content of this recording does not necessarily reflect the views of SAMHSA. ACEs (Adverse Childhood Experiences) are strongly associated with a wide range of health problems that can persist throughout a person’s lifespan. To learn more about Adverse Childhood Experiences and the Role of Substance Misuse Prevention, download a resource guide from the Strategic Prevention Technical Assistance Center (SPTAC): https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/sptac-ace-role-of-substance-misuse-prevention.pdf
Published: October 29, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The November 2023 issue honors National Native American Heritage Month, National Homelessness Awareness Month, and a brand-new Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy intensive technical assistance opportunity. As always, you will also find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   Make sure you're subscribed to our email contact list, so you never miss a month of The Great Lakes Current newsletter and thank you for reading!
Published: October 5, 2023
Multimedia
In today’s video, we will be discussing the roles Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and Positive Childhood Experiences (PACEs) play on mental health, substance misuse, and overall well-being. We hope this resource is useful for you, and we hope you can share this short video with your family, friends, and colleagues. Español - Experiencias Adversas de la Niñez (ACEs) y Experiencias Positivas de la Niñez (PACEs) Entre Comunidades Hispanas y Latinas En el video de hoy, hablaremos de los papeles que juegan las experiencias adversas y positivas de la niñez en la salud mental, el uso de sustancias, y el bienestar en general. Esperamos que este recurso le sea útil y esperamos que pueda compartir este breve vídeo con su familia, amigos y colegas. Descarga Aquí En Español
Published: September 20, 2023
Multimedia
The Central East Prevention Technology Transfer Center is excited to announce the 8th episode of our weekly podcast: Walking in Wellness. This series is dedicated to empowering prevention professionals like you with the mindset and skill set necessary to prioritize wellness...every day. This weekly podcast can be accessed via Soundcloud or Spotify. Be sure to follow or subscribe to have episodes delivered weekly!   
Published: September 13, 2023
Multimedia
The Central East Prevention Technology Transfer Center is excited to announce the 7th episode of our weekly podcast: Walking in Wellness. This series is dedicated to empowering prevention professionals like you with the mindset and skill set necessary to prioritize wellness...every day. This weekly podcast can be accessed via Soundcloud or Spotify. Be sure to follow or subscribe to have episodes delivered weekly!   
Published: September 6, 2023
Multimedia
Christa Shifflett from Warren County, Virginia where she serves as Executive Director of the Warren Coalition. Over the past four years she and her staff have been developing a layered, intricate approach to developing community resilience.  The foundation of this work is  the ACE’s - Adverse Childhood Experiences.  I met up with Christa at the 2023 CADCA Mid-Year, following her presentation Connection and Resilience vs. Aces and Isolation – The Battle for Healthy Communities. Learn more about the Warren Coalition: www.warrencoalition.org The funder of this project, along with all other products of the Mid-America PTTC is the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. Although funded by SAMHSA, the content of this recording does not necessarily reflect the views of SAMHSA. SAMHSA’s National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative (NCTSI) improves treatment and services for children, adolescents, and families who have experienced traumatic events. You’ll find a link for this resource in the show notes or visit https://www.samhsa.gov/child-trauma  Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) can have a tremendous impact on future violence, victimization and perpetration, and lifelong health and opportunity. The Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has a website dedicated to helping you better understand. You’ll find a link for this resource in the show notes or visit www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/aces
Published: August 2, 2023
Multimedia
COURSE DESCRIPTION This workshop offers examples of evidence-based strategies and promising community-practices that promote healthy youth development and prevent substance misuse. Do you find it difficult to talk with families and communities about the adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) study and its relationship with substance misuse? If so, you are not alone. Beginning with highlighting awareness of toxic stress and its impact on child development, this training uses a strengths-based approach and a trauma-informed lens to focus on positive childhood experiences, as well as building resilience.  Select the View Resource button above to watch the recording. Below are the training companion materials. PowerPoint ACE Talk with Family and Friends Handout   PRESENTER Fabricia Prado is a Clinical Social Work/Therapist , LCSW, and is based out of Marietta, Georgia, United States. Fabricia specializes in the counseling of Anxiety, Depression, Trauma and PTSD, etc. The therapist has experience in handling cases of ADHD Therapy, Anger Management, Behavioral Issues, Child or Adolescent, Codependency, Coping Skills, Emotional Disturbance, Family Conflict, Grief, Life Transitions, Parenting, Peer Relationships, Relationship Issues, Self Esteem, Sexual Abuse, Spirituality, Stress, Substance Use, Women's Issues, and more. The types of therapies Fabricia offers include, Acceptance And Commitment Therapy, Clinical Supervision and Licensed Supervisors -, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Compassion Focused Therapy, Culturally Sensitive Therapy, Dialectical Behavior Therapy, EMDR Therapy, Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy, Motivational Interviewing, Multicultural Therapy, Person Centered Therapy, Positive Psychology, Strength Based Therapy, Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy therapy.     
Published: July 25, 2023
Multimedia
The Veil of Secrecy Removed – Breaking the Generational Curse Regarding HIV & Substance Misuse Zina Age, LMSW, MAC July 19, 2023, 1:00pm-2:30pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION Life unleashed an era of addictions and disease among communities that are marginalized. The 'Veil of Secrecy’ has cross-contaminated the lifestyles of those that are incarcerated, rural, youth, elderly, men, women and the LGBTQ communities. Secrecy nurtures disease because it provides an environment conducive to the spread of infection. Over the last forty years many of us have come to know about a virus with a cure that has so far eluded us. Some of us learned about this virus through news reports, others encounter the devastation of this virus on a more personal level. African American men and women account for a large number of new cases of those infected with HIV/AIDS. We could recite statistics, but that won’t save us. We are still often too silent in the places where we seek peace, cry and shout praises the most. We have to deal with the silent stigma/trauma that is ravaging our communities from a holistic perspective addressing secrecy, shame and guilt. The underserved multicultural population is affected in many ways including social economic, substance misuse, mental health, sex working, sex abuse history, and lifestyles associated with trauma informed care. This webinar is designed to address the silent stigma of HIV/AIDS and its connection to addictions in the United States. Sexually transmitted diseases and other health disparities combined with addiction issues are catastrophically affecting underserved communities. The 'Veil of Secrecy' offers service providers practical approaches to dealing with addictions and silence stigma from a holistic harm reduction perspective. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Describe secrecy, shame & guilt regarding addictions and HIV/AIDS Identify a practical approach to dealing with addictions and silence stigma from a holistic perspective Describe addictions in multicultural underserved communities PRESENTERS Zina Age, LMSW, MAC, a native of New Orleans, Louisiana and a graduate of Louisiana State University, holds a graduate degree in Social Work from Clark Atlanta University and a Masters in Addiction Counseling from the National Association of Forensic Counselors. Zina began working in the social services field in 1987, serving African American populations affected by HIV/AIDS and other health disparities. In 1996, she founded Aniz, Inc., which is dedicated to providing therapeutic education and support services for children and families from disadvantaged multicultural communities infected with and/or affected by HIV/AIDS.  Ms. Age has served on many national and local committees dedicated to educating people about issues surrounding HIV and is a noted public speaker that has been invited to serve as a panelist, guest presenter and keynote speaker at various universities, conferences and forums in the U.S. and abroad. She has delivered engaging presentations on topics such as, but not limited to: Undercover Community Mental Health and Substance Use Issues, HIV/AIDS Prevention and Risk Reduction Programs, Holistic Harm Reduction, the Inter-Generational spread of HIV/AIDS, Homophobia, Transphobia and Gender-phobia in the Black LGBT community, and Combating the “Secrecy, Shame and Guilt” surrounding HIV/AIDS issues.  
Published: July 19, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
In this Issue:   Data Gap Spurs Development of Collegiate Survey in Arkansas Additional College Intervention Resources Epi Corner: Substance Use, ACEs, and Mental Health Disorders as Contributors to Maternal Mortality What's Happening Around the Region? SAMHSA Releases New Data on Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Behavioral Health
Published: July 12, 2023
Multimedia
Trauma Informed Facilitation Skills for Substance Misuse Prevention Practitioners May 4-June 22, 2023   Series Overview The Northwest Prevention Technology Transfer Center and Trauma Informed Oregon (TIO) are pleased to offer this four-session synchronistic distance learning course for advanced substance misuse prevention practitioners working in Oregon. Substance misuse prevention program planners and coalition coordinators are responsible for creating safe, inclusive practices that engage all community members with a vision for a healthier community. Establishing trauma-informed (TI) meeting agendas and facilitation skills enables conveners of the meeting to promote wellness, positive connections, and healing while "getting the work done."   Objectives During this Series, participants will take part in interactive discussions, the practice of TI facilitation skills, and integrate workforce wellness, foundational principles of TI care, and aspects of cultural humility. Participants will recognize the signs and symptoms of toxic stress for themselves and community members who have experienced both acute and historical forms of trauma. Sessions will Include the following: Trauma-Informed (TI) facilitation skills: TI scripts for substance misuse prevention and reduction of harm, relational repair, feedback, and active listening. Interactive discussion: Participants will explore how to prevent toxic stress, vicarious trauma, and burnout for facilitators who have witnessed, and work with others who have experienced acute, racialized, and historical trauma. Focused discussion and practice: Participants will identify and practice approaches that support cultural humility, and well-regulated, confident, TI community-based substance misuse prevention facilitation.   Resources Trauma Informed Oregon: https://traumainformedoregon.org/ SAMHSA Trauma Informed: https://www.samhsa.gov/resource/ebp/practical-guide-implementing-trauma-informed-approach YouTube-Voices from the Community Shilo George Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hHpASOt2N8I YouTube-Cultural Humility Series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=_Mbu8bvKb_U&list=PL879555ABCCED8B50 The National Center for Trauma-Informed Care and Alternatives to Seclusion and Restraint (NCTIC): https://www.samhsa.gov/nctic The National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN): https://www.nctsn.org/ The Center for Nonviolent Communication (CNVC): https://www.cnvc.org/   Trainer Steffannie Roaché, MS LPC, is an Asst. Professor of Practice at Trauma Informed Oregon and Portland State University with a focus on workforce wellness, equity and inclusion through representation and power-sharing within systems, and the promotion of resources that support healing for communities affected by racialized and historical forms of trauma. She has over 20 years of experience providing trainings focused on resilience, trauma informed care, and culturally centered practices, and nearly 10 years of counseling within group and private practices. Steffannie has contracted with large and small organizations for workforce wellness, TIC, and DEI offerings and has successfully operated a private counseling and consulting practice. Her life’s passion is to work hand-in-hand with community partners to uplift hope, healing, and social justice within systems. Steffannie enjoys reading and writing poetry; listening to jazz, fusion, and alternative forms of music; traveling nationally and abroad; and spending time with family and friends outside of work and career activities.   Questions Contact Kathy Gardner ([email protected]) if you have additional questions about the content related to this webinar.
Published: June 23, 2023
Multimedia
Supplemental Resources: Presentation Slides   This presentation describes trauma's impact on communities and compelling reasons a community, and its prevention workforce, needs to become trauma informed and resilient focused. In sharing success stories from Northeast Tennessee in work she helped to pioneer, Becky also discussed practical steps communities can take to reduce the effects of toxic stress and childhood adversity and promote resilience.   Learning Objectives: Define trauma Describe trauma's impact on communities Explain the significance of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) study Provide attendees with steps to build community resilience   About the Presenter: Becky Haas is an international advocate and trainer on using a trauma informed approach, the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) study and Positive Childhood Experiences (PCEs) study. She is a pioneer in creating trauma informed communities.  The work she led while working for the Johnson City Police Department in Northeast Tennessee was recognized by SAMHSA in 2018 as a model for other cities to follow.  In 2019 she co-authored the "Building a Trauma Informed System of Care" toolkit for the TN Department of Children's services detailing a blueprint for creating community resilience.  This toolkit has been recommended as a “practical tool” in John's Hopkins, Progress in Community Health Partnerships: Research, Education, and Action.  Becky is the author of several sector specific professional development trainings with two receiving statewide accreditation in Tennessee as evidence-based training.  Among the diverse sectors of professionals, she has trained, she is uniquely distinguished for her work training police officers and others in the justice system to understand trauma.  In March of 2022, she was honored to receive the Friends of Children award from the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth for her work as a local, state, and national leader in implementation and support of trauma informed services and communities. Becky has a deep understanding of the importance for every professional sector to have intimate knowledge of healthy early childhood development and the potential for early adversity to disrupt that healthy development.  She is a founding member of the East Tennessee State University Ballad Health Strong Brain Institute and serves as a member of the CTIPP National Trauma Campaign strategy team and as a Strategic Partner for the Pathways to Resilience Program.   
Published: June 5, 2023
Print Media
This Issue: LAYING GROUNDWORK FOR A HARVEST AND HEALTHY YEAR This issue will bring a reflection by the NHL ATTC Co-Director, celebrating Mental Health Awareness Month. Elisabeth Stelson discusses a Vicarious Trauma research study. Please read to learn more about the resources we are highlighting this quarter, our upcoming events and projects, and more. In This Issue 01 Dicho of the Quarter 02 A Reflection by Our NHL ATTC Co-Director 03 Article by Elisabeth Stelson, MSW, LSW, MPH (Ph.D. Candidate) 05 Quarterly Highlights, and Celebrations 06 Media Corner 07 Staff Contact Information Esta edición traerá una reflexión de nuestra Co-Directora del NHL ATTC, celebrando el Mes de Concientización sobre la Salud Mental. Elisabeth Stelson habla sobre un estudio de investigación sobre trauma vicario. Lea para obtener más información sobre los recursos que destacamos este trimestre, nuestros próximos eventos y proyectos, y más. EN ESTA EDICION 01 El “Dicho” del Trimestre 02 Una Reflexión de Nuestra Co-Directora del NHL-ATTC 03 Artículo de Elisabeth Stelson, MSW,LSW, MPH (Candidata al Doctorado) 05 Puntos Destacados del TrimestreyCelebraciones 06 Rincón de los Medios 07 Información de Contacto del Personal
Published: May 30, 2023
eNewsletter or Blog
The Great Lakes Current is the e-newsletter of the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC.   The July 2023 issue honors National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month and World Hepatitis Day (July 28) by sharing events and resources on these topics. This issue also features newly released episodes from the Checking-In Podcast that focus on PTSD treatment providers' self-care and a new HealtheKnowledge course developed by the Great Lakes ATTC: NIATx Change Leader Academy: Rapid-Cycle Change for Teams.    As always, you will find links to all upcoming events and trainings hosted by the Great Lakes ATTC, MHTTC, and PTTC!      
Published: May 4, 2023
Multimedia
Webinar Description This interactive training used cultural lens to explore the intersects of grief and trauma and other impacting factors prevalent among communities of color, including immigrants and refugees, and how it can underscore substance use. Content reviewed how culturally conducive, trauma informed approaches are appropriate for rapport building, screening and care interactions with racial and ethnic communities struggling with substance use associated with grief, trauma, and stress.    Presenter Information Diana Padilla, MCPC, CARC, CASAC-T, is a Research Project Manager at New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center. She is a senior staff trainer for the Northeast & Caribbean Addiction Transfer Technology Center Network (NeC-ATTC), and a member of the ASAP-NYCB Trainer Registry. As a cultural agent, Ms. Padilla promotes an equity lens in trainings for engaging diverse communities in need, aligning with evidence and strength-based strategies within behavioral health, addiction, prevention, and recovery supports fields and professional capacities.    Additional Documents  PowerPoint Flyer
Published: April 10, 2023
Multimedia
Black Mothers: Intergenerational Systemic Trauma and Racism Laura Hinds, MSW, LCSW March 16, 2023, 10:00am-12:00pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION Whether it is cross-racial or as a Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) provider, understanding the socio-emotional challenges and legacy of racism on Black Mothers is an imperative part of first doing no harm and empowering healing and well-being. This presentation honors the ways in which Black Mothers have inherited the pain and impact of racism, and how our systems and institutions have embedded those racial disparities at great cost to them and their children. Included will be points of consideration and action for providers toward solution-focused interventions for this important population. LEARNING OBJECTIVES To decipher the socio-emotional and biological impact of intergenerational experiences of racism and how they affect engagement, utilization and outcomes of Black Mothers in Behavioral and Medical Health To describe the principles of caring that can mitigate the impact of these realities on their efforts with these affected moms To recite understanding of and determine a course of action to disrupt systems of oppression and racism within health services that can de-rail the well-being of Black Mothers and their children PRESENTERS Laura Hinds, MSW, LCSW, is a clinical social worker with experience in medical, behavioral and mental health settings.  Laura has had the pleasure of working with high acuity special needs populations and their providers for over 22 years.  An alumna and instructor at Penn’s School of Social Policy and Practice for 13 years, and Bryn Mawr’s School of Social Work and Social Research’s for the past 4 years, Laura has supported the learning and education of new social workers, veterans in the field, and their interdisciplinary partners.  With a focus on trauma, human and gender development, racial equity, and crisis intervention Laura supports special needs populations and those who serve them.  
Published: March 16, 2023
Multimedia
Trauma Informed De-Escalation: Consideration for Providers Laura Hinds, MSW, LCSW January 24, 2023, 10:00am-12:00pm EST COURSE DESCRIPTION Trauma Informed De-escalation moves beyond typical de-escalation content by acknowledging the role of biological responses, trauma histories, and neurobiology when engaging with individuals who have triggered and presenting challenging survival behavior. From identifying the provider's contributions to the conflict to empowering practitioners to better navigate the needs and reactions of those they serve, Trauma Informed De-escalation offers tools and strategies that can be offered universally in any heightened emotional conflict. LEARNING OBJECTIVES Explain the definition of trauma and principles of Trauma Informed Care as they relate to De-escalation considerations. Examine the common causes of conflict and the opportunities they offer for engaging the principles of Trauma Informed Care in our responses. Provide strategies, tips, and language to actualize Trauma Informed De-escalation in various settings with different populations. PRESENTERS Laura Hinds, MSW, LCSW, is a clinical social worker with experience in medical, behavioral and mental health settings.  Laura has had the pleasure of working with high acuity special needs populations and their providers for over 22 years.  An alumna and instructor at Penn’s School of Social Policy and Practice for 13 years, and Bryn Mawr’s School of Social Work and Social Research’s for the past 4 years, Laura has supported the learning and education of new social workers, veterans in the field, and their interdisciplinary partners.  With a focus on trauma, human and gender development, racial equity, and crisis intervention Laura supports special needs populations and those who serve them.  
Published: January 24, 2023
Multimedia
  Webinar Description    Despite the prevalence of trauma, it often goes undetected particularly in people already dealing with life challenges and at high risk of substance use, misuse, and mental health problems. This training reviewed variations of trauma, and factors that can increase the likelihood of re-traumatization, and how the use of trauma informed care principles are preventive and support effective engagement and care. Discussion also explored de-escalation and self-regulation techniques, and the importance of provider self-care for person centered, trauma informed care.   The Presenter    Diana Padilla is a Research Project Manager at New York State Psychiatric Institute, Columbia University Medical Center. She is a senior staff trainer for the Northeast & Caribbean Addiction Transfer Technology Center Network (NeC-ATTC) and provides training and technical assistance on implementation of Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT), and Equity & Inclusion capacity building opportunities.   Supplemental Materials    Powerpoint Flyer 
Published: January 20, 2023
Multimedia
Recording: Supporting Grandfamilies as Caregivers in the Opioid Crisis   DESCRIPTION: It is estimated that 2.6 million children are raised by grandparents, aunts, uncles, siblings, other extended family, and close family friends who step forward to care for them when parents are unable. With the rise in heroin and other opioid use, more relatives are raising children because the parents have died, are incarcerated, are using drugs, are in treatment or are otherwise unable to take care of their children. We understand that these children experience physical and cognitive health challenges as their caregiver’s face hurdles with housing, school enrollment, health, and legal issues as they struggle with their own grief.  This webinar will present evidence-based interventions designed to strengthen the resilience of these children along with tested approaches for supporting grandparents in this role.   LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Participants in this webinar will be able to: Identify the trends around children being raised by grandparents because of the opioid crisis Explain how children and grandfamilies are impacted by the opioid epidemic, including as they navigate these relationships Identify strategies for building skills and support systems for grandparents that are assuming the responsibility of caring for vulnerable grandchildren   PRESENTER: Chuck Klevgaard, BSW, CSPS Chuck Klevgaard is a nationally recognized expert in substance misuse prevention, public health, and school-based health. Drawing on his experience in collective impact and prevention-focused partnerships, he builds the capacity of states, tribes, schools, communities, and cities to use evidence-based substance misuse prevention and intervention strategies. He specializes in behavioral health support; training and technical assistance; and evidence-based alcohol, opioid, and substance misuse programs and policies. Nationwide, he provides trainings to prevent opioid overdose, including working with first responders to administer naloxone. As a consultant to Great Lakes Prevention Technology Transfer Center, Klevgaard provides training and technical assistance to substance misuse prevention entities within the Great Lakes region, which includes Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Ohio. Klevgaard, a Certified Senior Prevention Specialist through the Illinois Certification Board, Inc., holds a BSW from Minnesota State University Moorhead.
Published: January 19, 2023
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